Departmental Results Report 2018-19

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Minister's Message

The Honourable Bill Blair

As Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, I am pleased to present Public Safety Canada's 2018-19 Departmental Results Report. This report reflects a year of significant achievements in keeping Canadians safe from threats to our safety, whether natural or man-made.

Having spent decades in the police force, it's heartening for me to see concrete enhancements to the safety of our communities, with a focus on vulnerable and at-risk populations. The numbers tell an impressive story. In 2018-19, Public Safety Canada approved 50 projects to prevent or reduce the impacts of youth gangs, violence and bullying, through the National Crime Prevention Strategy. It successfully launched and finalized a process to add 110 police officers for Indigenous communities supported by the First Nations Policing Program – who will be in communities over the next two years. A total of $88.6 million was committed over seven years to repair, renovate, or replace policing facilities owned by First Nation and Inuit communities. The Department implemented eight projects under the Indigenous Community Corrections initiative, providing culturally-relevant services responding to the unique circumstances of Indigenous people in Canada. And we followed through on our commitment to eliminate segregation and improve mental health services in the criminal justice system, through the passage of Bill C-83, An Act to Amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and another Act.

It's also crucial that we stay ahead of the curve in protecting our critical infrastructure and build on our cyber capabilities, which are closely interconnected priorities. This year, we took a major step forward in so doing, releasing the National Cyber Security Strategy. The Strategy serves as the roadmap for Canada's path forward on cyber security, aiming to empower the Government and its partners to meet our goals. In order to further strengthen our collective resilience to cyber and physical threats, this year the Department built on its partnerships, assessments and information-sharing, conducting multiple physical and cyber assessments of infrastructure across the country.

This year, the Department also marked a milestone in another important area, by advancing the prevention of extremist violence, through the launch of the National Strategy on Countering Radicalization to Violence. The Strategy is bolstered by this year's creation of a National Expert Committee, which will help to advance its goals. In fact, I was pleased to participate in the announcements of several of the 26 project agreements signed this year through the Community Resilience Fund, to support partnerships and innovation in countering radicalization to violence.

Canadians have told us we need to build on our efforts to protect our communities from natural threats like floods and wildfires as well – threats that are only exacerbated by climate change. To help get us there, this year, Public Safety Canada launched the landmark Emergency Management Strategy for Canada: Toward a More Resilient 2030. The Strategy is the culmination of more than two years of work and strong engagement, supporting a whole-of-society approach to emergency management. The Department also developed the Indigenous Emergency Management Inventory Project, informing this collective work in a way that is culturally sensitive, appropriate and beneficial to Indigenous communities.

It's clearly an exciting time to be a part of Public Safety Canada. I invite all Canadians to read the 2018-19 Departmental Results Report, to better understand we are working together towards a safer and more resilient Canada.

The Honourable Bill Blair, P.C., C.O.M., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Results at a glance

Expenditures

Total: $727,600,440

Snapshot: 2018-19 Actual Expenditures

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This graphic describes Public Safety Actual Expenditures for 2018-19, broken down per Core Responsibility and Internal Services, for a total amount of $727.6M. National Security accounts for 3% ($24.9M) and is divided as following: 23% for Critical Infrastructure, 32% for Cyber Security, and 45% for National Security Leadership. Community Safety accounts for 41% ($297.1M) and is divided as following: 4% for Corrections, 4% for Border Policy, 5% for Law Enforcement and Policing, 23% for Crime Prevention, 27% for Serious and Organized Crime, and 38% for Indigenous Policing. Emergency Management accounts for 46% ($338.3M) and is divided as following: 4% for Emergency Preparedness, 14% for Emergency Prevention, and 82% for Emergency Response. As per Internal Services, it accounts for 9% ($67.3M) and is divided as following; 3% for Acquisition Management, 4% for Information Management, 5% for Legal, 6% for Financial Management, 9% for Human Resources Management, 11% for Communications, 14% for Real Property Management, 15% for Information Technology, and 32% for Management and Oversight. N.B due to rounding, combined percentages may not add to 100%.

Human Resources

Total: 1,180 FTEs

Snapshot: 2018-19 Actual Human Resources

Image description

This graphic describes the Actual Public Safety Human Resources for 2018-19 per Core Responsibility and Internal Services. There is a total of 1,180 Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) Employees who works for the Department. Of those, 223 FTEs (19%) works for National Security, 271 FTEs (23%) who work for Community Safety, 252 FTEs (21%) who work for Emergency Management, along with 434 FTEs (37%) who work for Internal Services.

Demographics

Snapshot: Public Safety Demographics

Image description

The graphic illustrates the PS employees divided by age categories:

The graphic also illustrates the Employment Equity groups representations within PS compared to the workforce availability

Results at a glance

Priority 1: Advance the federal government's efforts in protecting Canadians and Canada's critical infrastructure from cyber threats and cybercrime. 

To advance efforts to enhance the resilience of Canada's critical infrastructure, the Department:

Priority 2: Continue to advance countering radicalization to violence and counter-terrorism efforts with all levels of government, internal partners, and other stakeholders.

To advance the prevention of violence and counter-terrorism efforts, the Department:

Priority 3: Strengthen community resilience to emergencies in collaboration with provinces and territories, Indigenous communities and municipalities.

To modernize emergency management in Canada, the Department:

Priority 4: Increase the efficiency and effectiveness of community safety, with a focus on at-risk and vulnerable populations, including Indigenous peoples, as well as those with mental health issues in the criminal justice system.

To advance key programs to address gaps in services to vulnerable and at-risk populations, the Department:

  • Approved 50 projects preventing or reducing the impacts of youth gangs, youth violence, youth bullying, and youth cyberbullying through the National Crime Prevention Strategy;
  • Successfully launched and finalized a process that allocated up to 110 additional officers into First Nations Policing Program agreements;
  • Created a new program entitled “Funding for First Nation and Inuit Policing Facilities”, to support the repair, renovation and replacement of policing facilities in First Nation and Inuit communities;
  • Successfully renewed all Self-Administered police service and Municipal Quadripartite agreements under the First Nations Policing Program and continue to collaborate with their provincial/territorial counterparts on the renewal of agreements where the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) is the service provider;
  • Continued the development of Community Safety Plans under the Aboriginal Community Safety Planning Initiative;
  • Implemented fifteen projects under the Indigenous Community Corrections Initiative; and
  • Supported the advancement of Bill C-83, An Act to Amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act, which focuses on eliminating segregation and improving mental health services in the criminal justice system, and of Bill C-93, An Act to provide no-cost, expedited record suspensions for simple possession of cannabis, which would allow persons who have been convicted only of simple possession of cannabis offences to apply for a record suspension at no cost. 

Priority 5: Continue to strengthen an ethical and values-based departmental culture focused on respect and people-centered practices, mental health, and workplace wellness.

To continue implementing its Values and Ethics Strategic Framework and Action Plan, the Department:

  • Launched a Respect in the Workplace Campaign;
  • Launched a Violence and Harassment Policy;
  • Established an Ombuds Office Working Group to examine the feasibility of establishing an Ombuds Office;
  • Updated its Disclosure of Wrongdoing Policies and Procedures;
  • Completed a Psychological Hazard Assessment; and
  • Launched a Positive Space Initiative.

Priority 6: Ensure a strong focus on results through effective performance measurement and sound management practices consistent with the federal government's renewed focus on results.

To ensure a strong focus on results, the Department:

  • Increased performance measurement in corporate services/processes and policy development/implementation; and
  • Launched a new Integrated Risk Management Framework and Corporate Risk Profile.

For more information on Public Safety Canada's plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Results: what we achieved

Core Responsibilities

Public Safety Canada's activities and results are structured under four Core Responsibilities.

National Security

Description

Public Safety Canada develops policy, legislation and programs to support Canada's capacity to respond to a range of national security threats directed against Canadians, our critical infrastructure and our cyber systems while advancing national counter terrorism efforts.

Departmental Result: National security threats are understood and reduced

Results

An Act Respecting National Security Matters, 2017 (Bill C-59)

  • Enhances accountability and transparency of national security and intelligence agencies
  • Fulfils commitments to address problematic elements of the Anti-terrorism Act, 2015 (former Bill C-51)
  • Strengthens security and protects rights by keeping pace with evolving technology and threats

An Act Respecting National Security Matters (Bill C-59)

To strengthen national security accountability and transparency, Public Safety Canada and partner departments worked over the past two years to develop Bill C-59, An Act respecting national security matters. The comprehensive bill, which represents a complete overhaul of the national security framework in Canada, is expected to receive Royal Assent in summer of 2019.

National Security Transparency Advisory Group

Fulfilling the Government's commitment to increase transparency on national security activities, Public Safety Canada joined government entities in adopting the National Security Transparency Commitment.

During the reporting period, the Department launched the National Security Transparency Advisory Group to advise government senior officials on the implementation of the Commitment across the Government of Canada's national security and intelligence departments and agencies.

Objectives of the National Security Transparency Advisory Group

  • Canadians are informed on the effectiveness of national security programs and activities
  • Canadians understand what national security institutions do
  • Canadians are confident that the work of national security institutions is consistent with Canadian values, including, but not limited to, the Charter

Terrorist Listing Program

To reduce terrorist threats and keep Canadians safe, Public Safety Canada's Terrorist Listing Program completed the statutory two-year review of the List of Entities under the Criminal Code, which resulted in all 54 current entities reviewed remaining on the list. The process also saw two groups being added to the list (Islamic State – Khorasan Province and the Egyptian national group HASAM), the change of the entity Jabhat al-Nusra to Hay'at Tahrir al-Sham, and the addition of “Daesh” as an alias to the Islamic State listing. The Terrorist Listing Program increases Canada's ability to understand changes taking place among terrorist organizations and in this way better mitigate national security threats.

Enhanced Passenger Protect Program

The Department continued to work closely with federal partners toward enhancing the Passenger Protect Program to address fairness and privacy concerns, while keeping Canadians safe, as part of Bill C-59's improvements related to the Secure Air Travel Act (SATA). During the reporting year, the Department set up a project office to deliver the program, along with the Canada Border Services Agency, Transport Canada, and Shared Services Canada.

Federal Terrorism Response Plan

To strengthen its ability to manage terrorist threats/events and coordinate an effective counter-terrorism response, the Department continued to implement the Federal Terrorism Response Plan (FTRP) in collaboration with government partners and the emergency management community. Since the FTRP's implementation, the Department has discussed the plan with federal/provincial partners, has become more familiar with local plans, and sought ways of becoming better aligned across jurisdictions when an incident occurs. Finally, the FTRP has been exercised at various levels of governance (e.g.: Assistant Deputy Ministers, Deputy Ministers, and Ministers) to ensure a collective readiness to respond to threats and events.

Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security

During the reporting period, Public Safety Canada held three weekend meetings with the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security, which continued to engage and consult with the group in a long-term dialogue on initiatives related to national security and public safety, as shown in the Infographic below. The Roundtable focuses on emerging developments in national security matters, their impact on Canada's diverse and pluralistic society, and seeks to gather members' views on policy and program development. These initiatives promote new levels of cooperation between Public Safety Canada and partners, while creating engagement opportunities and ensuring that more comprehensive perspectives are taken into account on national security and public safety issues.

Year in Review: Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security (CCRS) engagement highlights

June 2018

Overrepresentation of Indigenous Peoples in the criminal justice system (CSC, Justice, RCMP)

October 2018

  • Passenger Protect Program (Public Safety)
  • Transparency in National Security (Public Safety)

November 2018

  • Reducing violent crime: A dialogue on handguns and assault weapons
  • Proposed amendments to the Secure Air Travel Regulations

February 2019

  • Inclusive Approaches to National Security
  • Countering Radicalization to Violence Online: Canada Redirect

Counter-Proliferation Dialogue

To strengthen Canada's counter-proliferation capacity, Public Safety Canada led the Counter-Proliferation Dialogue, a targeted stakeholder engagement initiative to gather suggestions for the Department to consider when updating Canada's approach to counter-proliferation. The Dialogue engaged 27 stakeholder groups from industry, academia, the scientific community, and allies, resulting in 268 formal submissions and 11 academic papers. The cornerstone of the Dialogue was a Discussion Paper (Strengthening Canada's Counter-Proliferation Framework) posted to the Department's website, which received 714 downloads.

Responding to National Security Threats

The Department's efforts to inform Canada's responses to national security threats continued during the reporting period. On economic-based threats, the Department continued to assess foreign investments under the national security provisions of the Investment Canada Act. On terrorist-related hostage takings of Canadians abroad, the Department engaged with the interdepartmental community. The Department also responded to national security incidents.

Further, it coordinated the release of the 2018 Public Report on the Terrorist Threat to Canada. In light of concerns regarding violent extremism terminology in the Report, the Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security was consulted to obtain advice for future reports to ensure that national security messaging is clear and does not conflate religion with a threat. On threats to the integrity of Canadian institutions, the Department supported new measures to secure Canada's democratic processes in the lead-up to the 2019 federal general election, in which Portfolio agencies will play key operational roles in identifying and responding to threats.

Canada's Ranking in the Global Terrorism Index

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Statistics: Canada Ranking in the Global Terrorism Index. One hundred sixty-three countries were analyzed, covering 99.7% of the world population. Of those countries, the first rank is Iraq. Canada ranks number 57, between Mexico (56) and Chile (58). This represents for Canada a move towards the top of 9 positions since 2017. Croatia ranked 137 and there is 26 countries with a rank of 138, having an index score of zero.

National Cyber Security Strategy

To support the implementation of Canada's renewed vision for cyber security, Canada's National Cyber Security Strategy was released in June 2018, covering three themes: Security and Resilience; Cyber Innovation; and Leadership and Collaboration. The Strategy was a key initiative from Budget 2018 ($24.5M over 5 years from 2019-20 to 2023-24 and $2.8M ongoing for Public Safety Canada). Key results from this fiscal year include the consolidation of federal cyber operations into the new Canadian Centre for Cyber Security, launched in October 2018, and the creation of the new National Cybercrime Coordination Unit in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) to support and coordinate cybercrime investigations between police forces across the country. Additional results related to the Strategy can be found in this report's Supplementary Information Tables. In 2018, Public Safety Canada also collaborated with Statistics Canada on releasing the results of the Cyber Security and Cybercrime survey, first of its kind in Canada and second worldwide.

National Cross Sector Forum Action Plan for Critical Infrastructure

Enhancing the resilience of Canada’s critical infrastructure

  • 26 Regional Resilience Assessment Program Cyber Assessments
  • 5 Technical Vulnerability Assessments to assess network defence capabilities
  • 5 Industrial Control Systems Security events for hands-on training and awareness
  • 1 cybersecurity tabletop exercise for the water sector to assess incident response

To enhance the resilience of Canada's critical infrastructure, Public Safety Canada implemented activities in the National Cross Sector Forum 2018-2020 Action Plan for Critical Infrastructure, released in January 2018. The Department bolstered partnerships with domestic and international stakeholders by holding national and regional meetings, and implemented a number of programs and exercises, including through the Virtual Risk Analysis Cell (VRAC). Through VRAC, the Department completed numerous infrastructure assessments for planned events (e.g. Canada Day 2018, G7 Summit) and ad hoc events (e.g. spring flooding, urban interface fires). These assessments provided stakeholders with information on potential disruptions to infrastructure.

National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure

Public Safety Canada continues to work closely with critical infrastructure stakeholders across Canada to determine opportunities to enhance policy and program development and implementation, including through the regular use of surveys. For example, following the Industrial Control Systems Security Symposium and the Multi-Sector Network Meeting, the Department conducted surveys to determine if these events addressed the topics and themes of greatest value to participants. Following site assessments from the Regional Resilience Assessment Program, the Department conducted surveys to determine if the program is meeting the needs of critical infrastructure organizations and how it could potentially be enhanced. At the end of the fiscal year, a review process for the National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure was launched to update the document as required.

International Partnerships

Examples of Public Safety Canada's multilateral engagement

  • April 2018: G7 Security Ministers Meeting in Toronto on countering terrorism, countering radicalization to violence and cyber security
  • August 2018: Five Country Ministerial in Australia on counter-terrorism, irregular migration, human trafficking, critical infrastructure and cyber security

Public Safety Canada continued to advance a wide range of international partnerships, including multilateral involvement through hosting the G7 Security Ministers Meeting and participating in the Five Country Ministerial to advance efforts such as countering terrorism, countering radicalization to violence and cyber security. Public Safety Canada and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) continue to develop a joint Public Safety-DHS Strategic Framework and Action Plan for Critical Infrastructure to strengthen cross-border partnerships, information sharing, and risk management.

Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018–19 Actual results 2017–18 Actual resultsFootnote 1 2016–17 Actual resultsFootnote 2
National security threats are understood and reduced Canada's ranking in the Global Terrorism IndexFootnote 3 >66 March 31, 2019 57Footnote 4 66 66
Canada's ranking in the Cybersecurity Index On or above G7 average (currently 11) March 31, 2019 9 N/AFootnote 5 9
Percentage of the population who think that the right mechanisms are in place to prevent and respond to terrorism acts in Canada TBDFootnote 6 March 31, 2019 57% N/A N/A
Percentage of partners indicating that Public Safety Canada provided effective policy leadership and operational coordination on national security issues TBDFootnote 7 March 31, 2019 70.5% N/A N/A
Critical Infrastructure Resilience ScoreFootnote 8 32.4-44.9 March 31, 2019 35.91 37.13 37.3

2018-19 Target Results vs. Actual Results: National Security

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This table illustrated the 2018-19 Targets Results vs Actuals Results for National Security, by the list of indicators and results

Results were achieved for the following indicators:

Targets were not available for the following indicators:

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2018–19 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
32,000,684 32,000,684 28,638,240 24,915,803 (7,084,881)

The variance between planned spending of $32.0 million and actual spending of $24.9 million is mainly due to a transfer of $3.8 million to the Communications Security Establishment (CSE) to establish the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security (CCCS). There was a $3.0 million lapse in capital related to the creation of a cyber security system. The expenditure was not required as the CSE already had such a system in place when responsibilities were transferred and the CCCS was created. The remaining difference of $0.3 million is accounted for by various items of lesser value.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
236 223 (13)

The variance between the planned FTEs (236) and the actual FTEs (223) of 13 is mainly due to the transfer of staff to the Communications Security Establishment to establish the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Public Safety Canada's Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBase.

Community Safety

Description

Public Safety Canada provides national coordination to help Canadian communities and stakeholders respond to crime and build community resilience, promote the safety and security of Canadian communities and institutions, enhance the integrity of Canada's borders, and support the provision of policing services to Indigenous communities.

Departmental Results:

Results

National Action Plan on Crime Prevention

To develop and disseminate knowledge related to effective, evidence-based crime prevention programming, Public Safety Canada worked closely with provincial and territorial partners to implement the Five-Year National Action Plan on Crime Prevention, which concludes this year. Results included a Final Report detailing lessons learned, a framework to guide future collaboration with the provinces and territories related to crime prevention, and the launch of the Crime Prevention Inventory.

Crime Prevention Inventory

Crime Prevention Inventory

  • Contains information on more than 190 prevention programs
  • Works to assist policy makers, practitioners, and volunteers
  • Supports results-driven approaches that are sustainable, cost-effective, and that address key risk factors for offending

As part of evidence-based crime prevention programming, the online Crime Prevention Inventory was launched in April 2018, in collaboration with the provinces and territories. The web portal makes information on effective crime prevention programs easily accessible to all policy makers and practitioners in Canada. The Crime Prevention Inventory is the first national database of crime prevention programs in Canada available to the public.

National Crime Prevention Strategy

Through the National Crime Prevention Strategy, Public Safety Canada provides time-limited funding in the form of grants and contributions for projects that contribute to preventing and reducing crime in Canada and to increasing knowledge about what works in crime prevention. In an effort to reduce criminal behaviours among youth-at-risk and high-risk offenders in communities, proposals were sought under the National Crime Prevention Strategy for both direct interventions and projects to strengthen community readiness among vulnerable populations, including Indigenous communities, to prevent or reduce the impacts of youth gangs, youth violence, youth bullying and cyberbullying in communities. Applicants were encouraged to develop projects around components that have proven to be successful in previously funded interventions, including: social intervention; education and employment; and cultural or community education to allow communities to build on their strengths and existing resources. The call for proposals resulted in over 550 applications, 50 of which were selected and are in the development phase. The Department also published the results of the 2017-2018 Evaluation of the National Crime Prevention Strategy, which concluded that the Strategy remains relevant and that there is a continuing need for crime prevention investments and efforts to address risk factors that lead to crime.

Crime Severity Index

Crime Severity Index

Image description

This graphic illustrates the trend from 2004 to 2018 in terms of rating of the Crime Severity Index. It went from a rate of 104.1 in 2004 down to 66.9 in 2014 and then moved up to 75 in 2018.

During the reporting period, Public Safety Canada also continued to work with the Department of Justice and federal/provincial/territorial partners to support the use of restorative justice approaches in the criminal justice system. The Federal-Provincial-Territorial Ministers Responsible for Justice and Public Safety met in November 2018 to advance discussions on a number of priority areas, such as modernizing the criminal justice system, prioritizing public safety and police work, new legal frameworks for cannabis and impaired driving, and Indigenous overrepresentation in the criminal justice system. These meetings also resulted in the approval and public release of the Principles and Guidelines for Restorative Justice Practices in Criminal Matters.

Corrections and Criminal Justice Reform

The Department supported the advancement of Bill C-83, An Act to Amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act, which focuses on eliminating administrative segregation in all federal correctional institutions and replacing it with a new correctional interventions framework through the use of Structured Intervention Units to promote rehabilitation in a humane and secure environment. The Bill also provides for improved mental health services, greater health care governance, clinical autonomy, patient advocacy services, better support for victims, and requires that the specific needs of Indigenous offenders are also addressed through the consideration of systemic and background factors in all offender management decisions. Budget 2019 allocated $297.3M ($71.7M annually ongoing) in support of Bill C-83, which is expected to receive Royal Assent in summer 2019.

Following the legalization of cannabis, there was a need to come up with recourse mechanism that would make things fairer for individuals with convictions for possession of cannabis. The Department and partner departments worked to develop Bill C-93, An Act to provide no-cost, expedited record suspensions for simple possession of cannabis. The Bill would make amendments to allow persons who have been convicted only of simple possession of cannabis offences to apply for a record suspension without being subject to the wait period required by the Criminal Records Act, or the $631 application fee. The Bill is expected to receive Royal Assent in summer of 2019.

Security Infrastructure Program

During the reporting period, the Security Infrastructure Program, which provides funding for security infrastructure improvements for not-for-profit organizations (places of worship, provincially and territorially recognized private educational institutions, and community centres) that are at risk of being victimized by hate-motivated crime, held two calls for applications. Improvements were made to the application process by providing standardized forms and guides to applicants and contractors which made the program more responsive to the need of communities by broadening the list of eligible expenditures and providing funding for basic training to respond to hate-motivated crime.

Pay-for-Performance Funding Approach

In line with the recommendation from the Standing Committee on Public Safety and National Security that social finance models be used to enhance and expand the total funds put towards crime prevention in Canada, Public Safety Canada partnered with the private sector to develop a pilot project that will use a pay-for-performance funding approach to implement crime prevention. During the reporting year, the Department finalized a number of project design details, including potential intervention locations, the estimation of preliminary budgets, and preliminary frameworks for performance management and evaluations. Work continues on the remaining deliverables, which include engaging with potential investors.

National Strategy on Countering Radicalization to Violence

To provide a comprehensive approach to countering radicalization to violence, the Department's Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence launched the National Strategy on Countering Radicalization to Violence in December 2018. The Strategy outlines the Government of Canada's approach to countering radicalization to violence and identifies three priorities: building, sharing and using knowledge; addressing radicalization to violence in the on-line space; and supporting interventions. In addition, in February 2019, the Minister of Public Safety launched the National Expert Committee on Countering Radicalization to Violence, made up of ten individuals from across the country with diverse backgrounds and expertise. The committee will help advance the work of the Canada Centre in implementing the National Strategy and will support engagement at the local level, focusing specifically on youth. The Canada Centre administers the Community Resilience Fund to support research and programs to build the evidence base along with local capability and capacity to counter radicalization to violence in Canada. For 2019-20 and beyond, the fund will have $7 million available each year for existing and new projects.

Law Enforcement Modernization

Public Safety Canada continued to provide leadership and coordination to the Canadian law enforcement community and federal, provincial, territorial and international partners, to develop effective and efficient policies, strategies and programs to address crime and disorder. The Department also supported the Royal Canadian Mounted Police's (RCMP) transformation and modernization agenda, which included accepting the recommendations resulting from the independent reviews of harassment within the RCMP and establishing a Management Advisory Board to help guide the foundational changes required to address the recommendations. The Board's 13 members are in place, have met, and are providing expert external advice to the Commissioner. In addition, regulations were approved to prescribe a definition of “serious injury” in order to clarify when the RCMP must invoke its obligations to initiate an external investigation of a death or serious injury incident as set out in the RCMP Act.

Community Safety for Indigenous People

Policing in Indigenous communities: Two types of policing agreements

  • Self-administered Police Service Agreements exist where a First Nation or Inuit community manages its own police service under provincial policing legislation and regulations
  • Community Tripartite Agreements exist where a dedicated contingent of officers from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) provides policing services to a First Nation or Inuit community

To improve the safety and security of Indigenous communities, the Department continued working with provinces, territories and Indigenous communities to deliver additional  investments of $291.2 million over five years in the First Nations Policing Program, which included funding for officer salaries, equipment and up to 110 additional officers. The allocation process for additional officers involved a national targeted call for applications to all First Nations Policing Program agreement holders and assessment by federal/provincial/territorial officials. Successful agreement holders have been informed, and Public Safety Canada continues to work with provinces, territories, and Indigenous communities to amend agreements to reflect new complement levels over the next two years. Public Safety Canada officials continue to collaborate with their provincial/territorial counterparts on the renewal of agreements where the RCMP is the service provider. At this time, all Self-Administered Police Service and Municipal Quadripartite agreements have been renewed for multi-year periods ranging from one to ten years.

In November 2018, the Government of Canada announced $88.6M in contributions funding beginning in 2018-19 and over seven years, to support the repair, renovation and replacement of policing facilities in First Nation and Inuit communities under a new program entitled “Funding for First Nation and Inuit Policing Facilities”. Public Safety Canada officials collaborated with their provincial/territorial counterparts in order to allocate $1.2M in 2018-19 to address the most urgent, known infrastructure projects in Indigenous communities served under the First Nations Policing Program. Public Safety Canada officials will continue to collaborate with provinces, territories, and Indigenous community members in order to develop the process to identify additional projects to receive funding under this program.

During the reporting year, Public Safety Canada also continued to improve community safety for Indigenous people via the Department's Aboriginal Community Safety Planning Initiative, which supports Indigenous communities in the development of customized Community Safety Plans.

Memorial Grant Program for First Responders 

In recognition of the critical role of first responders in protecting Canadians, the Government approved the Memorial Grant Program for First Responders, which came into effect in April 2018, providing a new federal $300,000 tax-free grant to families of firefighters, police officers and paramedics who die as a direct result of their duties at a time when they need it the most. The program contributes to a well-supported community of first responders safeguarding Canadian communities. During the reporting year, the Department issued 20 grant payments to eligible families and continues to process applications.

The Canadian Cannabis Survey

In support of the legalized cannabis regime, Public Safety Canada worked with provinces and territories and law enforcement partners on training, tools (including oral screening devices) and capacity building. The Department collaborated with Health Canada and Statistics Canada to release the first comprehensive survey of cannabis users, the Canadian Cannabis Survey (released quarterly), with topline findings in the infographic. The Department will undertake an analysis of the data generated from this survey, with a particular focus on the involvement of organized crime in the illicit cannabis market, driving behavior, prices paid as well as consumption among users, and contact with police. Additionally, Public Safety Canada has entered into an agreement with the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health with plans to invest in research on the relationship between Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentrations and driving impairment.

Bill C-46

An Act to Amend the Criminal Code (Bill C-46)

  • Repeals and replaces the entire Criminal Code transportation regime, resulting in a modernized, simplified, and comprehensive approach to transportation offences
  • Increases deterrence, makes it easier to detect impaired drivers, and simplifies the investigation and proof of the impaired driving offences, resulting in shorter trials and reduced delays
  • Contains two main Parts: Part 1, focused on drug-impaired driving and came into force on June 21, 2018, and Part 2, focused on alcohol-impaired driving and came into force on December 18, 2018

Public Safety Canada continued to advance measures to address drug-impaired driving through the implementation of Bill C-46, which received Royal Assent and came into force in 2018 in two stages. The Department provided funding to law enforcement for training and tools (e.g. oral fluid drug screeners) to enforce drug-impaired driving legislation. The first oral fluid drug screener was approved for use by the Attorney General in August 2018, and training on the use of the tool was offered in October 2018. The devices are fast, non-invasive, and accurate, and will enhance the enforcement of drug-impaired driving in Canada.

Law Enforcement Response to Combat the Illicit Use of Drugs

During the reporting year, the Department continued to focus on addressing public health and safety impacts associated with the use of opioids and related substances, including fentanyl. Following-up on the Law Enforcement Roundtable on the Opioid Crisis (March 2018), Public Safety Canada and the Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction (CCSA) are finalizing a joint report and planning a second roundtable event. The Department continues to develop and deploy opioid de-stigmatization awareness training for law enforcement as part of Budget 2018 commitments ($5.77M over 5 years from 2018-19 to 2022-23 for Public Safety Canada) and has established a law enforcement working group comprised of various law enforcement agencies across Canada to advise the Department on best practices relating to the development and deployment of a national awareness strategy and bringing forward key considerations to support de-stigmatization approaches. Public Safety Canada also participated in two opioid-related technical workshops that directly supported commitments made under the North American Dialogue on Drug Policy. Topics discussed at the workshops included best practices and approaches to combat the opioid crisis and the illegal transportation of opioids through mail shipments.

Initiative to Take Action against Guns and Gangs

An Act to amend certain Acts and Regulations in relation to firearms (Bill C-71)

  • Expands background checks to consider the lifetime history of licence applicants
  • Requires sellers to verify the validity of a firearms licence before selling a non-restricted firearm
  • Requires businesses to keep point-of-sale records for non-restricted firearms
  • Safeguards the impartial classification of firearms by putting the responsibility in the hands of technical experts

To tackle gun and gang activity in Canada, Public Safety Canada concluded funding agreements with eleven provinces and territories to bolster prevention, gang exit, outreach, and awareness programming. The Department is also supporting provinces, territories and organizations with additional funding to implement enforcement and intervention initiatives to counter gun and gang violence in Canada, including taking action against illegal trafficking of firearms and drugs ($327.6 million over five years) and a 25% increase to the youth Gang Prevention Fund. Additional results related to the Initiative to Take Action against Guns and Gangs can be found in this report's Supplementary Information Tables. The Department developed a number of firearms measures that prioritize public safety, including the advancement of Bill C-71, which is expected to receive Royal Assent in summer of 2019, and the conclusion of a national engagement process on reducing violent crime involving firearms.

Border Security

During the reporting year, the Department continued working closely with Portfolio partners and other federal departments and agencies to strengthen the integrity and efficient management of the border to address irregular migration and other cross-border law enforcement issues related to immigration and refugees. To tackle the illicit trade in tobacco products, the Department renewed an agreement with the Mohawk Council of Akwesasne to provide specialized policing services to address organized crime, including contraband tobacco. The Department also continued to work with the U.S. to implement the new Canada-U.S. preclearance agreement, which is expected to be brought into force in summer 2019. The agreement will facilitate enhanced travel and trade and expand preclearance for travellers at land, rail, marine, and air facilities in both countries.

Overrepresentation of Indigenous People in the Criminal Justice System

The Indigenous Community Corrections Initiative contributed to the joint Public Safety Canada-Department of Justice Canada Strategic Action Plan to reduce the overrepresentation of Indigenous peoples in the criminal justice system. The Department co-chairs the Federal-Provincial-Territorial Aboriginal Justice Working Group, which is currently developing a Pan-Canadian Strategy to Address the Overrepresentation of Indigenous People in the Criminal Justice System. The Indigenous Community Corrections Initiative, which provides funding to support alternatives to incarceration projects and/or reintegration supports for Indigenous offenders, continues to help address overrepresentation. In addition, the response to the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Interim Report included funding for organizations with expertise in law enforcement and policing, and for academia, to lead a review of police policies and practices in regards to their relations with the Indigenous Peoples they serve. Research projects are currently underway.

Child Sexual Exploitation and Human Trafficking

Budget 2018 committed $14.51 million over five years, beginning in 2018–19, and $2.89 million per year ongoing, to combat human trafficking by establishing a National Human Trafficking Hotline, including an online portal and a referral mechanism to social service and law enforcement agencies. Progress was also made towards the development of a new national strategy to combat human trafficking. To inform strategy development, the Department held three regional consultations (Vancouver, Winnipeg and Montreal), one National Summit (Toronto), and one stakeholder meeting (Ottawa) during the reporting year. Overall, Public Safety Canada officials met directly with representatives from over 250 stakeholders, representing law enforcement, provincial/territorial governments, Non-Governmental Organizations, industry, Indigenous groups, and victims/survivors. Recognizing that the technological and threat landscape has changed considerably in the past decade, the Department also continues work towards modernizing the National Strategy to Combat Child Sexual Exploitation on the Internet with the aim of further reducing the sexual exploitation of children online, supporting victims/survivors, and bringing perpetrators to justice.

Expungement of Historically Unjust Convictions Act (Bill C-66)

The Expungement of Historically Unjust Convictions Act (Bill C-66) received Royal Assent in June 2018. The passage of Bill C-66 marks another important step towards righting the historical discrimination faced by LGBTQ2 Canadians for so many years. Historically, Canada unjustly convicted and imposed criminal records on individuals for engaging in consensual sexual activity between adult same-sex partners that would be lawful today. Records of convictions involving consensual sexual activity between same-sex partners of legal age can now be destroyed.

Security at the G7 Leaders' Summit

Major international events such as the G7 require significant security measures and the assistance of multiple jurisdictions and agencies from all orders of government to safeguard foreign officials, citizens and Canadian communities hosting such events. As part of the security and policing activities related to the G7 Leaders' Summit in Charlevoix, Quebec, in June 2018, and related Ministerial meetings in Whistler, Toronto, Montreal and Halifax, the Department coordinated the funding process on behalf of the Portfolio and provided federal financial assistance to local jurisdictions supporting the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) through the Major International Event Security Cost Framework Program. The RCMP-led security operation ensured a safe and secure event, and all jurisdictions will be reimbursed for the eligible security-related costs they incurred.

Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018–19 Actual results 2017–18 Actual resultsFootnote 9 2016–17 Actual resultsFootnote 10
Community safety practices are strengthened Percentage of stakeholders who reported consulting Public Safety research or policy documents to inform their decision-making >60% March 31, 2019 64%Footnote 11 N/A N/A
Percentage of stakeholders reporting good or very good results of projects funded through Public Safety's Community Resilience Fund, in line with project objectives >80% March 31, 2019 N/AFootnote 12 N/A N/A
Canadian communities are safe Crime Severity IndexFootnote 13 >70.1 March 31, 2019 75.01 73.61 72.01
Percentage of Canadians who think that crime in their neighborhood has decreased >6% March 31, 2019 N/AFootnote 14 N/A N/A
Crime is prevented and addressed in populations/ communities most at-risk Percentage of programs where participants experienced positive changes in risk and protective factors related to offending >75% March 31, 2019 67.7%Footnote 15 N/A N/A
Percentage of targeted at-risk populations that participate in Public Safety projects >75% March 31, 2019 N/AFootnote 16 N/A N/A
Difference between police reported crime in First Nation communities and police reported crime in the rest of Canada <12,400Footnote 17 March 31, 2019 19,169Footnote 18 N/A 12,031

2018-19 Target Results vs. Actual Results: Community Safety

Image description

This table illustrated the 2018-19 Targets Results vs Actuals Results for Community Safety, by the list of indicators and results.

Results were achieved for the following indicators:

Results were not available for the following indicators:

Results were not achieved for the following indicators:

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending authorities used 2018–19 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
365,203,644 365,203,644 361,135,833 297,109,222 (68,094,422)

The variance between the planned spending of $365.2 million and the actual spending of $297.1 million is primarily attributable to the transfer of $50.3 million to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for First Nations Community Policing Services. There was a lapse of $16.3 million for Canada's 2018-G7 Presidency under the Major International Events Security Cost Framework attributable to budget projections being lower than originally anticipated, contingency funding committed under contribution agreements not being required, and final claims for eligible expenses being less than projected. The Memorial Grant Program for First Responders lapsed $14.1 million due to lower than expected applications and the Drug Impaired Driving Initiative under the Combat Serious and Organized Crime Contribution Program lapsed $12.4 million due to delays in finalizing contribution agreements with several provinces and territories by the end of the fiscal year. The variance is offset by a transfer of $11.3 million from the National Disaster Mitigation Program under the Emergency Management core responsibility, as well as expenditures of $8.7 million related to a new program not reflected in the planned spending to take action against gun and gang violence. The remaining difference of $5.0 million is accounted for by various items of lesser value.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalent 2018–19 Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
293 271 (22)

The variance of 22 FTEs between the planned FTEs of 293 and the actual FTEs of 271 is primarily due to planned staffing that did not fully materialize.

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Public Safety Canada's Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBase.

Emergency Management

Description

Public Safety Canada works to strengthen national emergency preparedness to help prevent, mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from all-hazards events. The Department provides resources and expertise to Canadian communities in support of emergency preparedness, response, disaster mitigation and recovery.

Departmental Result: Canada can effectively mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from all-hazards events

Results

Proactive Approach to Flood Risks

During the reporting period, Public Safety Canada continued to collaborate with federal, provincial, territorial and municipal partners, Indigenous communities and other stakeholders to increase capacity to prevent and mitigate all-hazards emergencies. To better manage flood risks, the Department finalized, in collaboration with Natural Resources Canada, the Federal Flood Mapping Guidelines Series, a series of evergreen guidelines that help to advance flood mapping activities across Canada. The Department also continued to provide funding for flood mapping to provincial and territorial governments through the National Disaster Mitigation Program.

Emergency Management Strategy

To ensure the improvement of community resilience to both natural and human-induced emergencies, Public Safety Canada developed an Emergency Management Strategy for Canada with Provincial and Territorial Ministers Responsible for Emergency Management. The Strategy supports a whole-of-society approach to emergency management, outlines key priority areas to build a more resilient Canadian society by 2030, and aligns with the United Nations Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction. The strategy has five priorities in place and describes a variety of approaches to engage, empower, encourage, and educate emergency management partners.

Indigenous Emergency Management Inventory

The Department continued to work with the Assembly of First Nations to co-develop the Indigenous Emergency Management Inventory, which supports emergency management in a way that is culturally sensitive, appropriate, and beneficial to Indigenous communities. The project was successfully piloted in over 60 Indigenous communities across the country in the fall of 2018 and was endorsed by federal, provincial, and territorial Ministers and National Indigenous leadership in January 2019. The national roll-out is ongoing and includes tailored approaches for each jurisdiction.

National Risk Profile

Throughout 2018-19, the Department worked in partnership with Defence Research Development Canada to finalize the National Risk Profile Pilot. The National Risk Profile Pilot focused on natural hazards and was designed to enhance and refine strategic-level risk assessment methodologies and lay the groundwork for advancing risk- and evidence-informed decision making for policy, programs and operations. The results of this pilot will inform Public Safety-led work to establish a whole-of-government National Risk Profile that was funded in Budget 2019. This initiative will include a number of other federal departments such as Infrastructure Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Environment and Climate Change Canada, and Indigenous Services Canada, and will enhance whole-of-society awareness and collaboration on disaster risk reduction in Canada.

Public Safety Canada also continued to pilot an approach to a National Disaster Resilience Index. This included a review of international approaches to implementing similar indices, and the development of a prototype for internal discussion. While work on the National Disaster Resilience Index will not proceed beyond the pilot phase at this time, however, work to measure resilience and vulnerability to natural disasters and develop an evidence base to support decision making will be integrated into broader work on the National Risk Profile.

Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund

Public Safety Canada supported Infrastructure Canada in the launch and delivery of the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund (DMAF), a 10-year national program that will invest $2 billion in projects that will help communities better withstand natural hazards. As of March 31, 2019, 16 approved DMAF projects were announced totaling $757 million; with additional announcements on other projects forthcoming. All of the projects announced to date are related to flood mitigation. These investments contribute to Public Safety Canada's priority of strengthening community resilience to emergencies in collaboration with provinces and territories, Indigenous communities and municipalities.

National Disaster Mitigation Program

The National Disaster Mitigation Program (NDMP) fills a critical gap in Canada's ability to effectively mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from flood-related events. During the reporting year, the level of uptake increased by 29% from the previous year, making the program fully subscribed for 2019-20. Approximately 25% of funds for new provincial and territorial projects went towards mapping of flood zones and 61% went towards mitigation infrastructure. NDMP will sunset on March 31, 2020.

Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements

Public Safety Canada continued to encourage provinces and territories to use the mitigation provisions in the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA) and reviewed the mitigation components to address issues and clarify guidance. The Department is also renewing its approach to disaster recovery and recovery financing to align it with the principles of the Emergency Management Strategy and the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change.

National Exercise Program

The Department continued to advance whole-of-government preparedness for events affecting the national interest by delivering scenarios that simulate emergency events, addressing 100% of the priorities of the National Exercise Program for the reporting year. This included both leading and supporting other federal organizations in the design, development, delivery and evaluation of whole-of-government exercises. Serving as secretariat of the Federal Exercise Working Group (FEWG), the Department worked with Federal partners towards an integrated, all-hazards approach to emergency preparedness. After-Action reports were completed and included recommendations to mitigate areas for improvement and build on best practices in an effort to continually improve responses to future events.

Government Operations Centre (GOC)

The Government Operations Centre (GOC) provides an all-hazards integrated federal emergency response to events (potential or actual, natural or human-induced, accidental or intentional) of national interest. It provides 24/7 monitoring and reporting, national-level situational awareness, warning products and integrated risk assessments, as well as national-level planning and whole-of-government response management. During the reporting year, Public Safety Canada led the strategic coordination of the federal response to the floods across Canada; the G7 Leaders' Summit in Charlevoix; the wildfires in British Columbia and the Prairies; and the tornadoes in the National Capital Region. During each of these emergencies, Public Safety brought all partners together to harmonize collective action and ensure efficient analysis and action. The Department also led the development of the Government of Canada contingency plans for annual cyclical events such as Spring Flooding, Wildland Urban Interface Fires, and Atlantic Hurricane Season. Public Safety Canada continued to partner with Public Services and Procurement Canada, and Shared Services Canada to modernize the GOC by advancing efforts on the construction of the Operations Centre Project for the new GOC facility. The planning phase of the project was completed and the design phase has been initiated.

National Search and Rescue Secretariat

To improve collaboration between partners of Canada's Search and Rescue community, Public Safety's National Search and Rescue Secretariat continued with the development of a national strategic policy framework as well as strengthening of the governance for Canada's search and rescue community. The Department led Canada's engagement with the International Cospas-Sarsat Programme, a satellite-based search and rescue system that supports the detection of emergency beacon signals in order to locate aircraft, ships and backcountry hikers in distress. The Department also continued to work collaboratively with the Urban Search and Rescue Advisory Committee to guide the long-term policy vision for the Heavy Urban Search and Rescue program (the most technically specialized form of urban search and rescue), including the development of a national concept of operations. The Department partnered with the Search and Rescue Volunteer Association of Canada to deliver the AdventureSmart program, which helps Canadians and visitors to Canada better understand the risks and hazards associated with outdoor recreational activities. The Department also continued improving its information systems and data management strategy, the latter of which includes the development of a nationwide baseline study of search and rescue data inclusive of Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+).

National Public Alerting System

During the reporting year, Public Safety Canada worked with federal, provincial and territorial and private sector partners to expand the National Public Alerting System (NPAS) and improve its governance and technical infrastructure. NPAS provides emergency management organizations throughout Canada with a standard alerting capability to warn the public of imminent or unfolding hazards to life through such means as radio and cable television. Since April 2018, alerts are also received through compatible wireless devices (e.g. smartphones). Since its implementation, more than 100 wireless emergency alerts have been successfully issued through the Alerting System, including Amber, flood, and tornado alerts, some of which have directly contributed to saving lives.

Public Safety Broadband Network

Public Safety Broadband Network (PSBN): Key facts

  • A PSBN is a secure high-speed wireless data communications network
  • It would be used by emergency responders and public safety personnel to communicate with each other in emergency situations and during day-to-day operations
  • Technologies making use of a PSBN offer the potential to improve the safety and security of Canadians through improved communications infrastructure for first responders and governments

Public Safety established the Temporary National Coordination Office (TNCO) in July 2018 to advance options for a national and interoperable Public Safety Broadband Network (PSBN) for Canada. The TNCO is staffed by federal, provincial, and territorial officials, and other stakeholder groups. Progress during the reporting year included the development of user-centered principles for a PSBN, ongoing assessment of delivery options, and broad stakeholder engagement with potential end-users, industry, academia, and international partners. To encourage feedback on interim findings, options, and requirements for a Canadian PSBN, a report was developed to communicate the progress towards a national PSBN for Canada. This work in 2018-19 toward a Progress Report on a National PSBN, expected to published in summer 2019, will be an important milestone in the forthcoming fiscal year to ensure that a PSBN addresses the diverse needs and requirements of the public safety community.

Post-Traumatic Stress Injuries and Public Safety Personnel

During the reporting period, Public Safety Canada accessed the $30 million in Post-Traumatic Stress Injuries (PTSI) funding announced in Budget 2018 and signed a contribution agreement with the Canadian Institute for Public Safety Research and Treatment (CIPSRT) that will support a national research consortium between CIPSRT and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). The Department also worked on the launch of an Action Plan on Post-Traumatic Stress Injuries, in April 2019, which will identify action items to support all types of public safety personnel, all across the country. The Department also collaborated during fiscal year 2018-19 with the Public Health Agency of Canada to ensure that public safety personnel would be a key focus of the National Conference on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in April 2019.

2018-19 Target Results vs. Actual Results: Emergency Management

Image description

This table illustrated the 2018-19 Targets Results vs Actuals Results for Emergency Management, by the list of indicators and results.

Results were achieved for the following indicators:

Targets and results were not available for the following indicator:

Disaster Resilience Index

Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2018–19 Actual results 2017–18 Actual resultsFootnote 19 2016–17 Actual resultsFootnote 20
Canada can effectively mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from all-hazards events Percentage of priorities for the National Exercise Program (emergency scenario simulations) that are addressed over a two-year period >80% March 31, 2019 100% N/A N/A
Percentage of disaster events leading to requests for federal disaster assistance >25% March 31, 2019 29% N/A N/A
Disaster Resilience Index TBDFootnote 21 March 31, 2019 N/AFootnote 22 N/A N/A
Percentage of stakeholders indicating that the Government Operations Centre (GOC) provided effective leadership and coordination for events affecting the national interest >80% March 31, 2019 92% N/A 86%
Percentage of stakeholders who found that the information, guidance, and decision support provided by the Government Operations Centre (GOC) increased the effectiveness of their response and recovery efforts >80% March 31, 2019 91% N/A 87%
Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2018–19 Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
711,468,727 711,468,727 695,819,907 338,295,648 (373,173,079)

The difference of $373.2 million between the planned spending of $711.5 million and the actual spending of $338.3 million is mainly explained by lapses of $345.8 million under the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA) program. This program provides financial assistance to provincial and territorial governments in the event of unforeseen large-scale natural disasters and spending is therefore subject to significant variances. The difference is also explained by a transfer of $11.3 million to the National Disaster Mitigation Program (NDMP) to the First Nations Policing Program under the Community Safety core responsibility and a lapse of $10.6 million for the NDMP. The remaining difference of $5.5 million is accounted for by various items of lesser value.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
260 252 (8)

The variance of 8 FTEs is primarily due to staff turnover.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are:

Results

Departmental Security Plan

Departmental Security Plan

  • The Departmental Security Plan specifies procedures for managing security risks and outlines strategies, goals, objectives, priorities and timelines for improving departmental security
  • Ensures that decisions for managing security risks are substantiated through analyses and supported by processes which are rigorous, repeatable, and documented

During the reporting year, Public Safety Canada continued to manage security risks and enhance security controls across the organization through the implementation of the Departmental Security Plan. Key deliverables included annual reporting to the Departmental Management Committee on all activities and achievements and quarterly reporting on all service standards and performance indicators.

Accommodations Strategy in National Capital Region

To ensure effective management of resources and enhance organizational and individual productivity, Public Safety Canada continued to collaborate with Public Services and Procurement Canada to develop long-term accommodations strategies for offices located in the National Capital Region.

Information Management and Information Technology Services

Public Safety Canada continued to have regular meetings with Shared Services Canada and Public Services and Procurement Canada to advance the adoption of Government Enterprise information systems. The Department also continued participating in the Chief Information Officer Council and associated committees and working groups to advance broader digital modernization efforts, including those related to the Digital Policy. Improvements in corporate asset management and the use of cloud technology also continued.

Values and Ethics Strategic Framework and Action Plan

Values and Ethics Strategic Framework

  • Identifies short, medium and long-term outcomes that measure progress towards the goal of maintaining a healthy and values-based organization
  • Uses Public Service Employee Survey questions as indicators of progress and in identifying areas for improvement
  • Includes the following initiatives:
    • New Respect in the Workplace Campaign
    • New Violence and Harassment Policy
    • Ombuds Office Working Group
    • Updated Disclosure of Wrongdoing Policies and Procedures
    • New Psychological Hazards Assessment

Public Safety Canada continued to strengthen its departmental culture by implementing its Values and Ethics Strategic Framework and Action Plan. During the reporting year, 676 employees took the Respect in the Workplace Pledge, 351 took the Respect in the Workplace Training, and a number of tools on Respect in the Workplace were provided to managers. The Positive Space Initiative was also launched to ensure a safe and inclusive work environment, for which 53 champions were trained, including all Assistant Deputy Ministers. As part of this initiative, two inclusive (gender-neutral) washrooms were built at two main offices in the National Capital Region. The Department continued to conduct sessions to support the reduction of harassment and discrimination by developing a new Violence and Harassment Policy, as well as processes, tools and training to support employees and managers in creating and maintaining a workplace free from harassment. To reinforce workplace health and trust and provide employees with a safe mechanism to bring forward concerns, the Department established an Ombuds Working Group to examine the feasibility of establishing an Ombuds office and consulted federal departments with Ombuds offices to determine best practices and chart a path forward to creating an Ombuds office at Public Safety Canada. The Disclosure of Wrongdoing policies and procedures were updated and promoted. A psychological hazard assessment was also completed and its results are being integrated into the Values, Inclusion, Ethics and Wellness Action Plan. In addition, the Values and Ethics Strategic Framework was strengthened through the integration of Performance Measurement, to ensure ongoing and accurate measurement of employee health, and a psychological hazard assessment, to provide additional mitigation strategies to address work-related stress. The Department also promoted departmental networks associated with health and wellness (including Culture Connect); increased events aimed at improving health and wellness; and implemented the use of tools that increase health and wellness.

Decreasing Workload Pressures and Work-related Stress

To decrease workload pressures and stress and improve staffing, Public Safety Canada established Task Forces on Efficiencies and Staffing Solutions. The Task Force on Efficiencies was established to address workload pressures using efficiencies department-wide and across regions with a goal to maximize the adage of “work smarter, not harder.” The Staffing Solutions Task Force serves as a source of ideas and a sounding board for information, ideas and feedback on recruitment, staffing and retention issues and activities. Each Task Force has working groups addressing key issues, including through the improvement of a number of departmental business processes (e.g. approval of documents; forms and templates; process to respond to Question Period requests; financial accountability and efficiency) and other actions to decrease workload and work-related stress (e.g. increasing the use of business intelligence solutions, increasing flexible working arrangements, and increasing team-building events). The Department's psychological hazards assessment also contributed to an improved understanding of workload issues and provided additional mitigation strategies to address work-related stress.

Audits and Evaluations

During the reporting year, Public Safety Canada completed or substantially completed the engagements identified in the approved risk-based audit and evaluation plan, as per the established timelines. The Department also initiated a planned audit of Governance to address the effectiveness of the Department's governance structure and an audit on the application of Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) to assess if the Department has implemented and adequately performed GBA+ to inform decision-making.

Drug-Impaired Driving Education Campaign

The Department successfully led public education efforts on drug-impaired driving using a robust research-based marketing campaign and numerous partnerships with marketing experts and provinces, territories, and stakeholders. The campaign was delivered through social media and conventional media channels, and specifically targeted vulnerable communities, including rural, northern and Indigenous audiences. The two-year post-campaign survey found that 73% of the campaign's target audience had seen, read or heard the ad.  

Gender Based Analysis Plus

Public Safety Canada focused on capacity building to strengthen the application of Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) considerations in the development of its initiatives and how it manages its operations. Specifically, bi-annual reporting on the Department's GBA+ Action Plan was completed and presented to the senior management Internal Policy Committee to discuss the implementation of individual GBA+ Branch Plans, assess the integration of GBA+ considerations in Cabinet documents and discuss implementation challenges, gaps and best practices pertaining to GBA+. The Department also hosted two GBA+ practical learning workshops open to all Public Safety employees and developed a departmental GBA+ Guidance Template to support analysts in “asking the right questions” to identify and assess gender and diversity-based impacts. GBA+ was also considered in all departmental evaluations presented at the Performance Measurement and Evaluation Committee for 2018-19, as per guidance from the Treasury Board Secretariat. Diversity-related considerations were also applied in Public Safety's communications, notably in the development of the “Don't Drive High” awareness campaign.

Performance Measurement and Reporting

During the reporting year, the Department increased the effectiveness and strength of its performance measurement and reporting exercises by enhancing performance measurement practices and streamlining its internal processes. The Department developed new performance metrics for its corporate services and increased the use of performance measurement in policy development and implementation. The corporate planning process was also enhanced via a new Integrated Risk Management Framework and Corporate Risk Profile.

Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2018–19 Difference
(Actual spending minus Planned spending)
53,074,989 53,074,989 68,102,610 67,279,767 14,204,778

The difference of $14.2 million between the planned spending of $53.1 million and the actual spending of $67.3 million is primarily explained by an increase in expenditures related to leasehold improvements and information technology.

Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
443 434 (9)

The variance of 9 FTEs is primarily due to staff turnover.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend

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Departmental Spending Trend Graph by fiscal year and by thousands of dollars

Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19 Main Estimates 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2018–19 Total authorities available for use 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used)
National Security 32,000,684 32,000,684 18,590,543 18,659,461 28,638,240 24,915,803 26,584,284 47,330,324
Community Safety 365,203,644 365,203,644 343,083,282 364,146,367 361,135,833 297,109,222 193,908,028 175,023,175
Emergency Management 711,468,727 711,468,727 327,321,389 143,166,044 695,819,907 338,295,648 680,843,474 922,575,019
Subtotal 1,108,673,055 1,108,673,055 688,995,214 525,971,872 1,085,593,980 660,320,673 901,335,786 1,144,928,518
Internal Services 53,074,989 53,074,989 54,002,387 52,155,629 68,102,610 67,279,767 57,735,831 52,683,418
Total 1,161,748,044 1,161,748,044 742,997,601 578,127,501 1,153,696,590 727,600,440 959,071,617 1,197,611,936

2018-19 Planned vs. Actual: Financial Resources

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2018-19 Planned versus Actuals for Financial Services by Core Responsibility:

Actual spending for 2018-19 is $231.5 million (24%) lower than expenditures in 2017-18.  The decrease is mainly due to:

Offset by:

In 2018-19, the Main Estimates and Planned Spending decreased by $8.1 million (1%) to a Total Authorities Available for Use of $1,153.7 million.  The decrease is attributed to:

Offset by:

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (full-time equivalents)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2016–17 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents
National Security 192 206 236 223 162 163
Community Safety 258 264 293 271 299 292
Emergency Management 262 245 260 252 237 221
Subtotal 712 715 789 746 698 676
Internal Services 411 404 443 434 438 434
Total 1,123 1,119 1,232 1,180 1,136 1,110

The increase of 61 full-time equivalent (FTEs) (5%) from 1,119 FTEs in 2017-18 to 1,180 FTEs in 2018-19 Actual is mainly due to the commencement of new initiatives in 2018-19 such as funding to take action against gun and gang violence, the Critical Infrastructure Security program, the enhanced Passenger Protect Program and funding for infrastructure projects in Indigenous communities.

The decrease of 52 FTEs from 2018-19 Planned FTEs to 2018-19 Actual FTEs is mainly due to delays in staffing and unanticipated departures. Planned staffing in 2019-20 will see a decrease of 44 FTEs (4%) from 1,180 Actuals FTEs in 2018-19 to 1,136 in 2019-20. This decrease is mainly related to the transfer of funding, but also the FTEs, to the Communications Security Establishment to establish the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security.

2018-19 Planned vs. Actual: Human Resources

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2018-19 Planned versus Actuals for Human Resources by Core Responsibility

Expenditures by vote

For information on Public Safety Canada's organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2018–2019.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of Public Safety Canada's spending with the Government of Canada's spending and activities are available in the GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Public Safety Canada's financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019, are available on the departmental website.

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial information 2018–19 Planned results 2018–19 Actual results 2017–18 Actual results Difference (2018–19 Actual results versus 2018–19 Planned results) Difference (2018–19 Actual results versus 2017–18 Actual results)
Total expenses 1,102,546,099 1,294,697,618 1,071,022,208 192,151,519 223,675,410
Total revenues (2,700,000) (2,153,776) (2,045,173) 546,224 (108,603)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 1,099,846,099 1,292,543,842 1,068,977,035 192,697,743 223,566,807

Note: Public Safety Canada's Future-Oriented Statement of Operations for the year ended March 31, 2019, are available on the departmental website.

Total departmental expenses have increased by $224M from $1,071M in 2017–18 to $1,295M in 2018-19. This increase can be attributed primarily to an increase in transfer payments to provinces, Indigenous communities and to non-profit organizations.

The chart below presents the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position by showing expenses by category as a percentage of total departmental accrual accounting expenses. Transfer payments represent $1,107M of Public Safety Canada's expenses. Meanwhile, salaries and employee benefits represent $128M; professional and special services $23M, accommodation $14M and other expenses $23M.

2018-19 Expenses by Category

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This chart presents the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position by showing expenses by category as a percentage of total departmental accrual accounting expenses. Transfer payments represent 85.5% of expenses which amounts to $1,107 million; salaries and employee benefits account for 9.9% which is $128 million; professional and special services is 1.8% with $23 million; accommodation is 1.1% at $14 million; and other expenses, which include travel and relocation, equipment, communication, equipment rentals, amortization, repairs, bad debt expense, utilities, material and supplies, account for 1.7% or $23 million of total expenses.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2019 (dollars)
Financial Information 2018–19 2017–18 Difference
(2018–19 versus 2017–18)
Total net liabilities (3,113,935,553) (2,471,946,267) (641,989,286)
Total net financial assets 581,394,732 496,986,419 84,408,313
Departmental net debt (2,532,540,821) (1,974,959,848) (557,580,973)
Total non-financial assets 9,594,668 12,487,291 (2,892,623)
Departmental net financial position (2,522,946,153) (1,962,472,557) (560,473,596)

Public Safety Canada's total net liabilities of $3,114M is primarily comprised of Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangement (DFAA) ($2,458M) program liabilities, accounts payables and accrued liabilities ($644M), vacation pay and compensatory leave ($8M) and employee future benefits ($5M). The increase of $642M in total net liabilities is mainly attributed to an increase in the DFAA accrued liabilities.

Liabilities (in millions of dollars)
2018-19 2017-18 Variance % Variance
($3,114) ($2,472) ($642) (26%)
The Department's total liabilities increased by ($642M) in 2018-19 compared to 2017-18
Liabilities 2018-19
New OIC's (e.g. BC Spring Floods 2017 & 2018, Manitoba Spring Floods 2017) ($205M)
Approved business cases (e.g. Alberta Floods 2013) ($479M)
Mitigation costs ($217M)
Payments $263M
Changes in estimates 146M
Subtotal (Increase in the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangement (DFAA) accrued liabilities) ($492M)
G&C Payables At Year End (PAYE) ($144M)
Other ($6M)
Total increased liabilities ($642M)

Total net liabilities were approximately $3,114M at the end of 2018-19, an increase of 26 percent when compared to the previous year. The chart below shows total net liabilities by type of liability. The total net financial assets of $581M include $576M due from the consolidated revenue fund and accounts receivables and advances of $5M. The increase in the total net financial assets is mainly due to the increase in the due from the consolidated revenue fund.

2018-19 Total Net Liabilities

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This chart shows total net liabilities by type of liability. Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA) make up 78.9% of total net liabilities at $2,458 million; accounts payable and accrued liabilities make up 20.7% at $644 million; and vacation pay, compensatory leave and employee future benefits make up 0.4% with $13 million.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister:
The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P
Institutional head:
Ms. Gina Wilson
Ministerial portfolio:
Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Enabling instrument(s):
Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Act (2005)
Emergency Management Act (2007)
Year of incorporation/commencement:
2003

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d'être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on Public Safety's website.

Operating context and key risks

Information on operating context and key risks is available on Public Safety's website.

Reporting Framework

Public Safety's Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2018–19 are shown below.

2018-19 Reporting Framework by Core Responsibility

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2018-19 Reporting Framework by Core Responsibility
Core Responsibility National Security Community Safety Emergency Management

Departmental Results and Departmental Results Indicators

National security threats are understood and reduced

  • Canada's ranking on the Global Terrorism Index
  • Canada's ranking in the Cybersecurity Index
  • Percentage of recommendations that are accepted by the Government
  • Percentage of the population who think that the right mechanisms are in place to prevent and respond to terrorism acts in Canada
  • Percentage of partners indicating that Public Safety Canada provided effective policy leadership and operational coordination on national security issues
  • Critical Infrastructure Resilience Score

Community safety practices are strengthened

  • Percentage of stakeholders who reported consulting Public Safety research or policy documents to inform their decision-making
  • Percentage of stakeholders reporting good or very good results of projects funded through Public Safety's Community Resilience Fund, in line with project objectives

Canadian communities are safe

  • Crime Severity Index
  • Percentage of Canadians who think that crime in their neighbourhood has decreased

Crime is prevented and addressed in populations/communities most at-risk

  • Percentage of programs where participants experienced positive changes in risk and protective factors related to offending
  • Percentage of targeted at-risk populations that participate in public safety projects
  • Difference between police reported crime in First Nation communities and police reported crime in the rest of Canada

Canada can effectively mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from all-hazards events

  • Percentage of priorities for the National Exercise Program (emergency scenario simulations) that are addressed over a two-year period
  • Percentage of disaster events leading to requests for federal disaster assistance
  • Disaster Resilience Index
  • Percentage of stakeholders indicating that the Government Operations Centre (GOC) provided effective leadership and coordination for events affecting the national interest
  • Percentage of stakeholders who found that the information, guidance, and decision support provided by the Government Operations Centre (GOC) increased the effectiveness of their response and recovery efforts

Program Inventory

  • National Security Leadership
  • Critical Infrastructure
  • Cyber Security
  • Crime Prevention
  • Law Enforcement and Policing
  • Serious and Organized Crime
  • Border Policy
  • Indigenous Policing
  • Corrections
  • Emergency Prevention/Mitigation
  • Emergency Preparedness
  • Emergency Response/Recovery

Supporting information on the Program Inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada's Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Public Safety Canada's website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

General enquiries:
613-944-4875 or 1-800-830-3118
E-mail:
enquiries.enquetes@ps.gc.ca
Media enquiries:
613-991-0657 or media@ps.gc.ca
Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security (CCRS):
roundtable@ps.gc.ca
National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC):
1-800-830-3118 or prevention@ps.gc.ca
National Office for Victims:
1-866-525-0554
Passenger Protect Inquiries Office:
PS.PPinquiries-demandesPP.SP@canada.ca
Teletypewriter (TTY):
1-866-865-5667
Fax:
613-954-5186
Post:
269 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
K1A 0P8

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Core Responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a Core Responsibility are reflected in one or more related Departmental Results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three-year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Result (résultat ministériel)
A Departmental Result represents the change or changes that the department seeks to influence. A Departmental Result is often outside departments' immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
Departmental Result Indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a Departmental Result.
Departmental Results Framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
Consists of the department's Core Responsibilities, Departmental Results and Departmental Result Indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on an appropriated department's actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person-year charge against a departmental budget. Full-time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analyses plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to help identify the potential impacts of policies, Programs and services on diverse groups of women, men and gender differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorités (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2018–19 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government's agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government;  A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada's Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontal)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence-based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.
program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization's influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization's mandate, vision and core functions.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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