Public Safety Canada Departmental Plan 2021–22

From the Minister

The Honourable William Sterling Blair

As Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, I am proud to introduce Public Safety Canada’s 2021-22 Departmental Plan, which highlights plans and priorities for the year ahead as we address the ongoing pandemic and other threats.

Serious and violent crime remains a reality in our communities. Tragically, too many people continue to be killed or injured in shootings, as we saw in Nova Scotia in April of 2020. In 2021-22, combatting gun violence will remain a top priority for the Government. Public Safety Canada will take action to fulfill our remaining commitments on firearms, including new measures to temporarily remove firearms from individuals who may pose a risk to themselves or others. We will also work with municipalities and Indigenous communities to support anti-gang programming and prevention programs aimed towards at-risk youth. Further, Public Safety Canada will continue to work with partners to address and combat hate groups, online hate and harassment, ideologically motivated violent extremism, and terrorist organizations.

The September 2020 Speech from the Throne highlighted the Government’s commitment to taking action to address systemic inequities and the overrepresentation of certain groups in the criminal justice system. To ensure Indigenous communities have policing services that are responsive and culturally appropriate, Public Safety Canada and Indigenous Services Canada are working with Indigenous partners to co-develop legislation that recognizes First Nations policing as an essential service, and to expand the number of communities served by the First Nations Policing Program. In the same vein, the Department will help ensure that Indigenous communities have access to tools to determine their own community safety priorities. To ensure the pardons system is fair and proportionate, and achieves its goal of allowing people living crime free to become fully-contributing members of society, the Department will work with the Parole Board of Canada to advance record suspension (pardons) reform.

Public Safety Canada will also support the introduction of legislation to enhance civilian oversight of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Canada Border Services Agency, to improve transparency, combat systemic discrimination, and reassure the public that Canada’s law enforcement system is being held to a high degree of accountability.

Combatting the heinous crimes of human trafficking and online child sexual exploitation continues to be a priority. This year, we will support national initiatives to raise awareness of online child sexual exploitation and reduce the stigma associated with reporting. The Department will also engage with the digital industry to further advance efforts to put a stop to this intolerable crime and work with provinces to increase criminal justice professionals’ ability to investigate and prosecute offenders.

In communities across Canada, thousands of people’s lives have been tragically cut short as a result of the opioid drug epidemic that is showing no signs of slowing down. In fact, the COVID-19 pandemic is making the crisis even worse. That is why in 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue its efforts to address the crisis and reduce the supply of illicit drugs in Canada.

Canadians spend more time online than anyone else in the world and this activity has only increased during the pandemic. In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to play a leadership role in protecting Canadians from cyber crimes and other malicious cyber activity. That includes leading national efforts to strengthen the resilience of our critical digital and physical infrastructure. The Department will continue to support the Government’s efforts to ensure that 5G technology is introduced in Canada in a way that recognizes both its significant economic opportunities and its security challenges. The Department will also continue to advance Canada’s integrated government response by protecting Canada’s democratic institutions by securing them against foreign interference, disinformation and other cyber threats.

The ongoing pandemic has underlined the critical importance of emergency management, as well as the country’s preparedness and response efforts. In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will begin implementing the joint Federal-Provincial-Territorial Emergency Management Action Plan. As well, recognizing that public safety personnel selflessly put themselves in harm’s way to help others, Public Safety Canada will continue to advance Canada’s first-ever National Action Plan on Post-Traumatic Stress Injuries for public safety personnel. The Department will also begin targeted consultations on options for expanding the Memorial Grant Program for First Responders.

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue important work with the U.S. and other partners on key topics that support the continued health, safety and economic security of both nations. This includes the safe and secure management of our shared border during and post-pandemic.

More details about these and other plans and priorities can be found in this report. I urge all Canadians to keep reading and learn more about what Public Safety Canada and its dedicated, skilled and hard-working employees are doing to support safe and secure communities.

The Honourable William Sterling Blair, P.C., C.O.M., M.P.

Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Plans at a glance

Key Highlights

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to advance initiatives under the National Security, Community Safety and Emergency Management core responsibilities.

Result: National security threats are understood and reduced

Result: Community safety practices are strengthened

Result: Canadian communities are safe

Result: Crime is prevented and addressed in populations/communities most at-risk

Result: Canada can effectively mitigate, prepare for, respond to, and recover from all hazards events

COVID-19 Impacts

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic, Public Safety Canada anticipates the following impacts to its operations:

For more information on Public Safety Canada’s plans, priorities and planned results, see the “Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks” section of this report.

Core responsibilities: planned results and resources, and key risks

This section contains detailed information on the Department’s planned results and resources for each of its core responsibilities. It also contains information on key risks related to achieving those results.

National Security

Description

Public Safety Canada develops policy, legislation and programs to support Canada’s capacity to respond to a range of national security threats directed against Canadians, our critical infrastructure and our cyber systems, while advancing national counter terrorism efforts.

Planning highlights

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will seek to achieve national security results through the following activities.

Transparency in National Security

Public Safety Canada will continue to enhance transparency and trust in the national security community. The National Security Transparency Commitment (NSTC) seeks to foster robust and open engagement between the Government of Canada and Canadians on national security issues. In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will coordinate and advance the implementation of the NSTC by producing tools and public documents that encourage the sharing of information and perspectives with Canadians on national security issues, as well as information regarding the work of Canada’s national security organizations. The Department will continue to support the National Security Transparency Advisory Group (NS-TAG) in advising the Deputy Minister of Public Safety Canada and other officials on the implementation of the NSTC across the Government of Canada’s national security and intelligence community. Public Safety Canada will also continue to advance declassification initiatives by conducting a pilot project for the declassification of historical national security records, also in collaboration with the national security and intelligence community.

Passenger Protect Program and Supporting Initiatives

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue supporting air transportation security through the ongoing administration of the Passenger Protect Program (PPP). The PPP is an aviation security program intended to prevent malicious actors from engaging in activities that would threaten national security, by preventing them from boarding an aircraft or by subjecting them to additional screening measures. Public Safety Canada will also contribute to aviation security by operationalizing the Secure Air Travel Act list (sometimes referred to as the “SATA List” or the “No Fly List”).

Following the successful launch of Canada's centralized, government-controlled screening system and the Canadian Travel Number (CTN), Public Safety Canada will continue to support safe and secure air travel, while also protecting the rights and freedoms of travellers. The Department will continue to work with the Canada Border Services Agency, Transport Canada, and Shared Services Canada on enhancements to the PPP, with a view to fully operationalizing centralized passenger screening by November 2022. During this period, Public Safety Canada will also continue to process CTN applications to help prevent delays at airports for travellers who have the same, or similar, name as someone on the SATA list.

Public Safety Canada will also continue to work with the security and intelligence community to ensure that the Government can monitor and respond to Canadian extremist travellers.

Terrorist Listings under the Criminal Code

Public Safety Canada will continue to work with Portfolio agencies, the interdepartmental community, and international partners to provide policy advice and recommendations relating to the listing of terrorist entities under the Criminal Code of Canada. In February 2021, the Government added 13 groups to the list in order to counter their activities and apply significant consequences, including four ideologically motivated violent extremist entities. Listings will assist in the investigation and prosecution of terrorist acts and offences, as well as helping prevent the exploitation of Canada’s financial systems by terrorist entities.

Financial Crimes Coordination Centre

In 2021-22, the Department will launch the Financial Crime Coordination Centre (FC3) (formerly known as the Anti-Money Laundering Action, Coordination and Enforcement Team or ACE), whose operations will focus on coordinating support for anti-money laundering and anti-terrorist financing operational partners. This will be achieved through operationally-focused contributions to Anti-Money Laundering Regime policies and priorities; the enhancement of anti-money laundering knowledge, skills and expertise; and the strengthening of federal and regional coordination and access to operational support. Tailored to operate within the Canadian legislative regime, the FC3 initiative aims to test a collaborative, integrated, public-to-public model of developing policy, advancing learning, and supporting enforcement.

Economic-Based Threats to National Security

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will lead an interdepartmental effort to develop a comprehensive policy framework which aims to further counter economic threats to Canada’s national security, such as the loss of valuable intellectual property, military and dual-use technology, sensitive personal information, and compromised critical infrastructure. Simultaneously, the Department will seek to maintain a positive climate for innovation, investment and the promotion of economic resilience.

Public Safety Canada will also continue to work with partners on assessing foreign investments under the national security provisions of the Investment Canada Act. The Department will also continue to enhance outreach and engagement activities with key stakeholders to raise awareness regarding the broad range of risks surrounding economic-based security threats.

Delivery of Critical Infrastructure Programs

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will focus on providing critical infrastructure owners and operators with concrete tools and actionable information to strengthen resilience through:

Enhancing Canada’s Approach to Critical Infrastructure Resilience

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to lead national efforts to enhance the security and resilience of Canada’s critical infrastructure. Through collaborative work with public and private sector partners, and stemming from an earlier examination of the National Strategy for Critical Infrastructure, the Department will focus on the identification of potential initiatives and approaches that could further strengthen critical infrastructure protection in Canada.

National Cyber Security Strategy Mid-term Strategy Evaluation

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will initiate and conduct a mid-term evaluation of the National Cyber Security Strategy (NCSS).The evaluation will support program performance assessments and continuous improvement efforts that ensure the Department is progressing in the delivery of NCSS goals, including by evaluating the effectiveness of national cyber security coordination and leadership within the Government of Canada and on a national level.

Cyber Security Cooperation Program

Public Safety Canada will continue to contribute to the Government of Canada’s leadership role in advancing cyber security. In 2021-22, the Department will work with recipients of grants and contributions from the Cyber Security Cooperation Program to support a range of innovative cyber security projects and initiatives across Canada.

Telecommunications Security

As the lead department for Canada’s 5G Security Examination, Public Safety Canada will continue to ensure that the policies and plans for the introduction of 5G technology in Canada recognize both the significant economic opportunities and related security challenges that this new technology holds.

Critical Cyber Systems

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to support development of a new critical cyber systems framework which aims to protect Canada's critical cyber systems in the finance, telecommunications, energy and transportation sectors. This initiative will also support the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security by providing advice and guidance to critical infrastructure owners and operators on how to better prevent and address cyber-incidents.

Ransomware

Ransomware is becoming an increasingly common and indiscriminate threat which may affect a wide variety of targets, including individuals, small businesses, and even large private enterprises and government organizations. Public Safety Canada recognizes the potential for highly damaging impacts, and will continue to lead interdepartmental efforts to enhance policy coordination, by proposing policy and operational solutions to increase incident reporting, deter criminality and enhance cyber resilience. Addressing ransomware at the national level will also require federal-provincial and private-public cooperation.

International Partnerships

Recognizing the global nature of security challenges and solutions, Public Safety Canada will continue to advance key priorities through bilateral and multilateral engagements with key international partners such as the United States and other Five Eyes countries, and through multilateral fora including the G7 and the United Nations.

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

Public Safety Canada will continue to use GBA+ to ensure inclusive outcomes for Canadians. Specific examples of these efforts include:

United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Combatting money laundering and terrorist financing is a key facet of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Public Safety Canada will support SDG 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions) and SDG 17 (Partnerships for the Goals) through the following targets:

Experimentation

Further to the Direction on Experimentation from Treasury Board Secretariat, Public Safety Canada is finalizing its own experimentation framework that will guide the Department’s efforts in testing new approaches to existing problems and measuring their impact.

Key risk(s)

Public Safety Canada’s mission is to build a safe and resilient Canada. The Department must exercise a high level of awareness, engagement and adaptability to keep Canadians safe, maintain a cohesive and coordinated approach to safety and security, and generate results for Canadians while managing a variety of risks.

At the corporate level, there are three risks that may affect the Department’s capacity to ensure that national security threats are understood and reduced:

While plans are in place to address all risks, if not mitigated properly they may challenge the ability to deliver on the Department’s mandate, act in a coordinated manner and render timely decisions.

The planned initiatives listed in the previous section help mitigate the risks associated with the achievement of our departmental results, and additional control and mitigation strategies are managed through Public Safety Canada’s Corporate Risk Profile.

Planned results for National Security
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 actual resultFootnote 1 2018–19 actual resultFootnote 2 2019–20 actual resultFootnote 3
National security threats are understood and reduced Canada’s ranking on the Global Terrorism Index ≥ 82 March 31, 2022 57 54 N/AFootnote 4
Percentage of the population who think that the Government of Canada is transparent in explaining national security concerns to Canadians ≥ 70% March 31, 2022 N/A N/A N/AFootnote 5
Percentage of the population who think that the right mechanisms are in place to prevent terrorism acts in Canada ≥ 60% March 31, 2022 N/A 42.3% 51.7%
Percentage of the population who think that the right mechanisms are in place to respond to terrorism acts in Canada ≥ 60% March 31, 2022 N/A 47.1% 56%
Percentage of partners indicating that Public Safety Canada provided effective policy leadership and operational coordination on national security issues ≥ 75% March 31, 2022 N/A 70.5% 83%
Critical Infrastructure Resilience Score Between 34.2 and 41.94 March 31, 2022 37.13 35.91 36.01
Percentage of partners indicating that Public Safety Canada provides effective leadership in advancing Canada’s cyber security interests 100% March 31, 2022 N/A N/A 90%Footnote 6
Canada’s ranking in the Cyber Security Index Average score of G7 Nations or higherFootnote 7 March 31, 2022 9 N/AFootnote 8 N/AFootnote 9

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary financial resources for National Security
2021–22 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending
24,246,094 24,246,094 23,233,313 23,408,810

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for National Security
2021–22 planned full-time equivalents 2022–23 planned full-time equivalents 2023–24 planned full-time equivalents
178 171 173

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Public Safety Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Community Safety

Description

Public Safety Canada provides national coordination to help Canadian communities and stakeholders respond to crime and build community resilience, promote the safety and security of Canadian communities and institutions, enhance the integrity of Canada’s borders, and support the provision of policing services to Indigenous communities.

Planning highlights

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will seek to achieve community safety results through the following activities.

Online Child Sexual Exploitation

Public Safety Canada, in collaboration with key stakeholders, will deliver initiatives to further protect children from online sexual exploitation. In 2021-22, the Department will continue to support national and targeted initiatives to raise awareness of online child sexual exploitation and reduce the stigma associated with reporting; work with provinces to increase criminal justice professionals’ ability to investigate and prosecute offenders; and engage with digital industry to further advance efforts to combat online child sexual exploitation. Public Safety Canada will also continue to provide funding to the Centre for Child Protection for the operation of Cybertip.ca, a tip line where Canadians can report suspected online child sexual exploitation, as well as Arachnid – an automated, web-crawling tool that helps reduce the online availability of child sexual abuse material, in order to break the cycle of abuse.

Human Trafficking

Public Safety Canada will continue working with federal partners, provinces, territories and other stakeholders to implement measures under the whole-of-government National Strategy to Combat Human Trafficking 2019-2024.

Specifically, in 2021-22 the Department will continue to:

Public Safety Canada will also continue to provide funding to the Canadian Centre to End Human Trafficking in order to ensure the continued operation of the multilingual, 24/7 toll-free Canadian Human Trafficking Hotline.

Border Policy

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to collaborate with other federal departments and Portfolio agencies to support the introduction of legislation to enhance civilian oversight of Canada’s law enforcement agencies, including the Canada Border Services Agency and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. This initiative will improve transparency, combat systemic discrimination, and reassure the public that Canada’s law enforcement system is being held to a high degree of accountability.

Reducing the Supply of Illicit Drugs

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to collaborate with domestic and international law and border enforcement partners to combat illicit drug trafficking, including opioids, by supporting supply reduction efforts.

Specifically, the Department will work to:

The Department will also continue to engage with international partners through bilateral and multilateral fora, to advance policy responses to various drug threats, including the flow of illegal drugs and their precursor chemicals from source and transit countries.

Reducing the Illegal Cannabis Market

Public Safety Canada will continue to collaborate with federal, provincial and territorial partners, as well as law enforcement stakeholders, to advance public safety-related components of the cannabis legalization framework, including the disruption and displacement of the illegal online cannabis market. In support of the evidence-based development and implementation of drug related strategies and action plans, the Department will undertake research projects related to cannabis sales on cryptomarkets and on effective disruption methods for other illicit drug markets.

National Crime Prevention Strategy

Through the National Crime Prevention Strategy (NCPS), Public Safety Canada will continue to implement projects selected under the 2018 NCPS Call for Applications and assess the outcomes to determine possible strategies for crime prevention. The Department will also continue to work with Indigenous and Northern communities to implement culturally-sensitive crime prevention practices and reduce criminal behaviors among at-risk youth and high-risk offenders.

Also through the NCPS, the Department plans to continue the development and implementation of new projects under the Crime Prevention Action Fund, in order to support the enhancement of targeted crime prevention interventions. More specifically, these interventions will provide additional support to Black Canadian, Indigenous and vulnerable youth, and particularly those who have been exposed to family or domestic violence. These preventative interventions will incorporate a multi-sectoral partnership approach which aims to enhance protective factors and reduce risk among vulnerable populations.

In alignment with Canada’s Gender-Based Violence Strategy and the development of a National Action Plan led by the Department of Women and Gender Equality, the NCPS will support gender-based violence prevention initiatives to test and implement promising practices which aim to meet the needs of identified groups.

Communities at Risk: Security Infrastructure Program

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to support not-for-profit organizations—such as places of worship, schools and community centres—with funding to enhance their security infrastructure. Additional enhancements will be made to the Security Infrastructure Program in order to ensure that it is responsive to the needs of communities at-risk of hate-motivated crimes. In the 2020 Fall Economic Statement, an additional investment of $13 million over 5 years and $2.6 million ongoing was announced for the existing Security Infrastructure Program. With this announcement, the Government of Canada investment will have more than quadrupled since 2017, taking the total funding invested in this transfer payment program to $23.6 million. This additional funding will allow Public Safety Canada to further protect communities at-risk of hate-motivated crimes.

Gun and Gang Violence Action Fund

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to work with provinces and territories to combat gun and gang violence through the Initiative to Take Action Against Gun and Gang Violence. The Department will continue to advance framework agreements which focus on intervention programming, training, action-oriented research, law enforcement activities, prosecution activities and improvement of data integrity and sharing.

Through federal funding of $214 million over five years under the Gun and Gang Violence Action Fund, provinces and territories have developed tailored strategies and approaches to address jurisdictional gun and gang crime priorities with their partners, while simultaneously contributing to the development of a national understanding of the scope of gun and gang violence. Public Safety Canada will continue to engage with provincial and territorial partners to monitor their activities in order to enhance the development and availability of data regarding the effectiveness of various initiatives.

Starting in 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will also work with key partners to deliver on the Government’s commitment to provide $250 million over five years to municipalities and Indigenous communities, to support anti-gang programming and prevention programs for at-risk youth.

Combatting the Use of Firearms and Gun Control Framework

Public Safety Canada will continue to strengthen Canada’s gun control framework and combat the criminal use of firearms. In 2021-22, the Department will develop an approach to support municipalities that wish to impose further restrictions on handguns, establishing a “red” and “yellow” flag regime to temporarily remove firearms from or suspend licences of those who pose a threat to themselves or others, enhancing secure storage requirements to deter theft and introducing a buyback program to compensate firearms owners affected by the May 1, 2020 ban of assault-style firearms. The Department will also support the coming into force of the remaining provisions under former Bill C-71, An Act to amend certain Acts and Regulations in relation to firearms.

National Strategy on Countering Radicalization to Violence

The Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence will further its work with partners to advance the objectives and priorities of the National Strategy on Countering Radicalization to Violence. Through the launch of an open Call for Applications planned for 2021, the Community Resilience Fund will continue to support the development and implementation of projects to assist youth and local organizations with research projects and events which aim to prevent radicalization to violence.

First Nations Policing and First Nations and Inuit Policing Facilities

Public Safety Canada will continue to deliver the First Nations Policing Program (FNPP) to support police services in First Nations and Inuit communities that are professional, dedicated and responsive. In 2021-22, the Department will continue to work with provinces, territories and Indigenous agreement holders to renew any expiring police service agreements. The Department will also support the co-development of a legislative framework for First Nations Policing and work to expand the number of communities served by the First Nations Policing Program.

Through the Funding for First Nations and Inuit Policing Facilities (FFNIPF) program, Public Safety Canada will continue to work with provinces and territories to identify policing facilities in Indigenous communities across Canada with urgent needs. In 2021-22, the Department will oversee an independent professional assessment of all FNPP policing facilities.

The Department will work with its provincial and territorial counterparts, as well as with the RCMP, to renew and implement the framework agreements used across jurisdictions where Community Tripartite Agreements (CTAs) with the RCMP are in place. Public Safety Canada will also engage with Indigenous communities in finalizing all CTAs.

Preclearance

The Department will continue to work with partners to expand preclearance operations for international travelers and cargo in order to bolster trade, increase border security and enable faster travel.

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

Public Safety Canada will continue to use GBA+ to ensure inclusive outcomes for Canadians, including in the development and delivery of community safety initiatives.

Specific examples of these efforts include:

While Public Safety Canada does not currently collect gender or social data as it relates to policing in First Nation communities, the Department will continue to engage with national Indigenous organizations, including women’s organizations, law enforcement and criminal justice system stakeholders, academia/experts and service providers to ensure diverse perspectives and views are represented in the way forward for policing in Indigenous communities.

United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

As part of a whole-of-government approach to achieving the UN SDGs, Public Safety Canada will contribute to advancing SDG 5 (Gender Equality), SDG 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth), and SDG 16 (Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions) through the following targets:

Experimentation

Further to the Direction on Experimentation from Treasury Board Secretariat, Public Safety Canada is finalizing its own experimentation framework that will guide the Department’s efforts in testing new approaches to existing problems and measuring their impact.

Key risk(s)

Public Safety Canada’s mission is to build a safe and resilient Canada. The Department must exercise a high level of awareness, engagement and adaptability to keep Canadians safe, maintain a cohesive and coordinated approach to safety and security, and generate results for Canadians while also managing a variety of risks.

At the corporate level, there are three risks that can affect the Department’s capacity to ensure that community safety practices are strengthened, that Canadian communities are safe, and that crime is prevented and addressed in populations and communities most at risk:

While plans are in place to address all risks, if not mitigated properly they may challenge the ability to deliver on the Department’s mandate, act in a coordinated manner and render timely decisions.

The planned initiatives listed in the previous section help mitigate the risks associated with the achievement of our departmental results, and additional controls and mitigation strategies are managed through Public Safety Canada’s Corporate Risk Profile.

Planned results for Community Safety
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 actual resultFootnote 10 2018–19 actual resultFootnote 11 2019–20 actual resultFootnote 12

Community safety practices are strengthened

Percentage of stakeholders who reported consulting Public Safety Canada research or policy documents to inform their decision making ≥ 70% March 31, 2022 N/A 64% 67%Footnote 13
Percentage of stakeholders reporting good or very good results of projects funded through Public Safety Canada’s Community Resilience Fund, in line with project objectives ≥ 80% March 31, 2022 N/A N/A N/AFootnote 14
Number of research products available to the Canadian public on radicalization to violence and efforts to prevent and counter it ≥ 35Footnote 15 March 31, 2022 N/A N/A N/A
Canadian communities are safe Crime Severity Index ≤ 70.1 March 31, 2022 73.60 75.63 79.45Footnote 16
Percentage of Canadians who think that crime in their neighbourhood has decreased ≥ 4% March 31, 2022 N/A N/A N/AFootnote 17
Crime is prevented and addressed in populations/communities most at-risk Percentage of programs where participants experienced positive changes in risk and protective factors related to offending ≥ 75% March 31, 2022 72% 58% 83%
Percentage of Public Safety Canada-funded programs targeting at-risk populations that achieve the intended participation rateFootnote 18 ≥ 75% March 31, 2022 N/A N/A 75%Footnote 19
Difference between police reported crime in First Nation communities and police reported crime in the rest of Canada ≤ 12,000 March 31, 2022 17,757 18,817 N/AFootnote 20

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Community Safety
2021–22 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending
417,496,295 417,496,295 418,395,422 331,512,579

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for Community Safety
2021–22 planned full-time equivalents 2022–23 planned full-time equivalents 2023–24 planned full-time equivalents
296 284 266

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Public Safety Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Emergency Management

Description

Public Safety Canada works to strengthen national emergency management to help prevent, mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from all-hazards events. Public Safety Canada provides resources and expertise to Canadian communities in support of emergency preparedness, disaster mitigation and recovery.

Planning highlights

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will seek to achieve emergency management results through the following activities.

Strengthened Resilience

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada, in collaboration with provinces and territories, will begin implementing the federal, provincial and territorial Emergency Management Action Plan (EMAP), which will identify priority areas over a one-year period to support the short-term implementation of the Emergency Management Strategy for Canada: Toward a Resilient 2030. The specific risks of each initiative or priority action undertaken via the EMAP will be examined in collaboration with partners, and mitigation measures will be developed. The EMAP will also begin using capability-based planning to pursue its objectives and outcomes, thereby ensuring that an evidence-based process is employed, jurisdictional boundaries are respected, and interoperability across Canada’s emergency management system is increased. The EMAP will be updated on an annual basis and reviewed biannually by the Senior Officials Responsible for Emergency Management.

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to advance Canada’s first-ever National Action Plan on Post-Traumatic Stress Injuries (PTSI) for public safety personnel. This includes continued support for the National Research Consortium on PTSI among public safety personnel. The Department will also support a $10 million pilot focused on the delivery of Internet-based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for public safety personnel in Saskatchewan and Québec.

Owing to the significant impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of public safety personnel and frontline workers, in 2020-21 Public Safety Canada supported development of a COVID Readiness Resource portal specifically for public safety personnel. This portal will continue to be made available throughout 2021-22 to provide self-assessment tools, coping strategies, family supports and strategies for public safety leadership, and on specific COVID-19 challenges (e.g. moral injury, risk and resilience, and preserving the well-being of public safety personnel and their families).

The Department will also continue to recognize emergency management practitioners across the country through the Emergency Management Exemplary Service Award.

Understanding Disaster Risks

Public Safety Canada will undertake a National Risk Profile (NRP) assessment which employs scientific evidence and stakeholder input to create a forward-looking picture of risk and capabilities. The NRP will assist in decision-making to support resilience to disasters such as floods, wildfires, and earthquakes. This will also enable an increased understanding of the diversity of risks faced by vulnerable populations, Indigenous peoples, and northern and remote communities. The first findings of this initiative are expected in 2021-22. The NRP will also seek to advance the development of a common language and set of terms, with the goal of increasing interoperability.

In collaboration with other departments and agencies, Public Safety Canada will also lead the development of a Federal Risk Assessment Strategy, which will promote enhanced coordination within the federal risk assessment community.

To improve understanding of disaster risks in various sectors of society, funding has been made available under the Department's Emergency Management Public Awareness Contribution Program to help Canadians understand the risks associated with natural disasters, and what can be done to prepare for and mitigate weather-related emergencies. In 2021-22, the Department will work with funding recipients and stakeholders to raise awareness of risks faced by vulnerable populations in Canada and promote actions that improve resiliency.

Whole-of-Society Disaster Prevention and Mitigation

To support whole-of-society disaster prevention and mitigation activities, Public Safety Canada will create an interdisciplinary Task Force on Flood Insurance and Relocation (TFFIR), which will include representatives from federal, provincial and territorial governments and the insurance industry.

As a first step in creating a National High Risk Residential Flood Insurance Program, the TFFIR will examine options to protect homeowners who are at a high risk of flooding and who lack adequate insurance protection. The TFFIR will also examine the viability of a low-cost, national flood insurance program and will consider options for the potential relocation of residents in areas which are at the highest risk of recurrent flooding. Indigenous Services Canada (ISC) will also work with First Nations partners and stakeholders on a dedicated Steering Committee on First Nations Home Flood Insurance Needs to examine the unique situations of these communities. The TFFIR and Steering Committee will work closely together to share information and engage with various partners, including with First Nations off-reserve, Inuit, and Métis communities and organizations. Both entities will begin their work by January 2021 and will report on their findings by the spring of 2022.

Public Safety Canada will also maintain efforts to improve public awareness of and preparedness for natural disasters through existing mechanisms, such as the Emergency Preparedness and Fire Prevention Weeks and through a new public advertising campaign.

Enhance Disaster Response Capacity and Coordination

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to support the advancement of a Public Safety Broadband Network in Canada, and the enhancement and sustainment of the National Public Alerting System (NPAS), to ensure the effectiveness and safety of first responders and to keep Canadians safe. The Department will lead the development of a collaborative federal, provincial, and territorial plan to strengthen governance, sustainability, and guidelines around the usage of the NPAS.

Guiding the long-term policy vision for the Heavy Urban Search and Rescue (HUSAR) Program —which is the most technically specialized form of urban search and rescue— continues to be a priority for Public Safety Canada. In 2021–22, the Department will work with key stakeholders, including provinces and territories, to advance the following strategic aims:

Public Safety Canada will also continue to lead Canada's engagement with the International COSPAS-SARSAT Programme Agreement, which is a satellite-based search and rescue system that allows for a more efficient and effective use of Canada's search and rescue assets. In accordance with Canada's treaty obligations, the Department will continue coordinating the efforts of federal partners to oversee the smooth operation of the Programme and the approval of a new system architecture and technology. In 2021–22, the Department will also lead efforts to renew the Programme in accordance with directions provided by member states in 2019. The renewal is expected to be a three-year negotiation process which will require member states to ratify the new Programme Agreement.

Strengthen Recovery Efforts

Public Safety Canada will lead a review of the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA). The Department will establish a panel of external experts, primarily academics, to provide advice and recommendations on the DFAA, taking into account the interdependencies of the DFAA with provincial and territorial programming.

The Department will also continue working closely with federal, provincial and territorial stakeholders to ensure that they receive regular updates regarding the work of the expert panel, and that they are engaged in the broader policy efforts and work being undertaken.

Federal Emergency Management Modernization Project

The Federal Emergency Modernization Project (FEMP) was established in 2017 to ensure the alignment and coherence of emergency management practices across government in support of provincial and territorial partners. The ongoing response to COVID-19 has highlighted the importance of reinforcing shared understandings within and between federal organizations on their roles, responsibilities and accountabilities for managing emergency events.

In 2021-22, the FEMP will continue to:

Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

Public Safety Canada will continue to use GBA+ to ensure inclusive outcomes for Canadians, including in the development and delivery of emergency management initiatives.

Specific examples include:

United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

As part of a whole-of-government approach to achieving the UN SDGs, Public Safety Canada will contribute to advancing SDG 1 (End Poverty), SDG 3 (Good Health and Well-Being), and SDG 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities) through the following targets:

Experimentation

Further to the Direction on Experimentation from Treasury Board Secretariat, Public Safety Canada is finalizing its own experimentation framework that will guide the Department’s efforts in testing new approaches to existing problems and measuring their impact.

Key risk(s)

Public Safety Canada’s mission is to build a safe and resilient Canada. The Department must therefore exercise a high level of awareness, engagement and adaptability to keep Canadians safe, maintain a cohesive and coordinated approach to safety and security, and generate results for Canadians while managing a variety of risks.

At the corporate level, there are three risks that can affect our capacity to ensure that Canada can effectively mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from all-hazards events:

While plans are in place to address all risks, if not mitigated properly they may challenge the ability to deliver on the Department’s mandate, act in a coordinated manner and render timely decisions.

The planned initiatives listed in the previous section help mitigate the risks associated with the achievement of our departmental results, and additional controls and mitigation strategies are managed through Public Safety Canada’s Corporate Risk Profile.

Planned results for Emergency Management
Departmental result Departmental result indicator Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 actual resultFootnote 21 2018–19 actual resultFootnote 22 2019–20 actual resultFootnote 23
Canada can effectively mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from all-hazards events

Percentage of stakeholders indicating that the National Exercise Program exercise cycle increased their preparedness for an event

≥ 80% March 31, 2022 N/A N/A N/AFootnote 24

Percentage of stakeholders indicating that the National Exercise Program exercise cycle increased their ability to respond to an event

≥ 80% March 31, 2022 N/A N/A N/AFootnote 25

Percentage of flooding events eligible for cost sharing under Public Safety Canada’s disaster recovery program for which provinces and territories implement mitigation projects

≥ 70% March 31, 2022 N/A N/A 46.93%

Percentage of Canadians who are aware of risks facing their household

TBD once a baseline is setFootnote 26 March 31, 2022 N/A N/A N/A

Percentage of Canadians who have taken measures to respond to risks facing their household

TBD once a baseline is setFootnote 27 March 31, 2022 N/A N/A N/A

Percentage of stakeholders indicating that the Government Operations Centre (GOC) provided effective leadership and coordination for events affecting the national interest

≥ 90% March 31, 2022 86% 87% 92%

Percentage of stakeholders who found that the information, guidance, and decision support provided by the Government Operations Centre (GOC) increased the effectiveness of their response efforts

≥ 90% March 31, 2022 87% 90% 91%

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Emergency Management
2021–22 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending
549,603,961 549,603,961 162,159,494Footnote 28 145,793,822Footnote 29

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for Emergency Management
2021–22 planned full-time equivalents 2022–23 planned full-time equivalents 2023–24 planned full-time equivalents
249 234 231

Financial, human resources and performance information for the Public Safety Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services: planned results

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of Programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refer to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct services that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. These services are:

Planning highlights

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will seek to support internal services through the following activities.

Financial Stewardship

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to ensure the sound financial stewardship of the Department with the objective of the optimal deployment of limited departmental resources to achieve public safety outcomes for Canadians.

Government of Canada Business Continuity Renewal

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will renew the Continuity of Government program, integrate lessons learned during the COVID-19 pandemic, and improve leadership, expertise, tools, and training in order to ensure the enhancement of organizational resilience across the Government of Canada. The Department will also develop a multi-year overarching strategy and implementation plan in partnership with other lead security agencies and enterprise service organizations to guide the program renewal.

Safeguarding and Security Management

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to promote a strong security culture across the Department by adapting security processes and controls to the changing work environment, and by enhancing awareness of insider risks and information safeguards through the ongoing implementation of Public Safety Canada’s Security Plan.

Diversity and Inclusion

Public Safety Canada will contribute to efforts to create a more diverse, equitable and inclusive Public Service.

The Department will continue to build on its Strategic Framework on Diversity and Inclusion, focused on three pillars:

To advance this work, in 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will set up a dedicated secretariat, develop a detailed Action Plan, and establish measurement and reporting tools.

Values and Ethics Strategic Framework and Action Plan

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to strengthen its departmental culture by updating and continuing to implement its Values and Ethics Strategic Framework and Action Plan.

Key initiatives include:

These efforts support Public Safety Canada’s ongoing response to challenges identified in the Public Service Employee Survey (PSES) and Departmental Pulse Surveys.

People Management

To ensure a strong focus on results through effective performance measurement and sound management practices, Public Safety Canada’s Human Resources (HR) team will continue to build the Department’s people management capacity and enhance HR services through innovative approaches such as recruitment initiatives, leveraging technology, and an Equitable, Diverse and Inclusive Staffing Strategy.

Client service delivery models will also be aligned with the evolving needs of the Department, particularly in light of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Performance Measurement Framework

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will continue to update the Performance Information Profiles (PIPs) for its 12 programs. This will ensure that relevant and meaningful metrics support programs in measuring and evaluating their performance more accurately. The PIP updates will also ensure that performance data is used to make evidence-based decisions and inform the allocation of resources for improved programs, policies and services. As a result, transparent, clear and useful information about departmental performance will be communicated to parliamentarians and the public through the annual Departmental Results Report.

Integrated Risk Management

In 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will expand its application of risk management by developing outcome-based risk management frameworks for each of its programs, and by establishing a community of practice. These comprehensive risk management frameworks will increase departmental understanding of the internal and external factors that can impact the achievement of strategic and business outcomes, support strategic priority setting and resource allocation, and inform decision making for improved outcomes.

Experimentation Culture

Further to the Experimentation Direction to Deputy Heads, in 2021-22, Public Safety Canada will enhance awareness and capacity in experimentation by increasing knowledge events and providing the resources required by employees to conduct methodologically sound experiments. The results of experiments will be broadly communicated to ensure that the insights and evidence generated through experimentation are used to improve existing processes and procedures.

Planned budgetary financial resources for Internal Services
2021–22 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending
64,117,301 64,117,301 63,573,021 61,736,081

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Planned human resources for Internal Services
2021–22 planned full-time equivalents 2022–23 planned full-time equivalents 2023–24 planned full-time equivalents
477 477 473

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Spending and human resources

This section provides an overview of the department’s planned spending and human resources for the next three consecutive fiscal years and compares planned spending for the upcoming year with the current and previous years’ actual spending.

Planned spending

Departmental spending 2018–19 to 2023–24

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory) spending over time.

Spending (voted and statutory) over time (thousands of dollars)

Image description

The graph illustrates the Department's spending trend over a six-year period starting in 2018–19 and ending in 2023–24. In fiscal year 2018–19, the actual statutory spending was 14,842,625 dollars; in 2019–20, 80,710,434 dollars; and in 2020–21, 56,026,923 dollars. In 2021–22, the planned statutory spending is 16,019,930 dollars; in 2022–23, 15,846,827 dollars; and in 2023–24, 15,480,495 dollars. In fiscal year 2018–19, the actual voted spending was 712,757,815 dollars; in 2019–20, 838,624,665 dollars and in 2020-21, 815,753,281 dollars. In 2021–22, the planned voted spending is 1,039,443,721 dollars; in 2022–23, 651,514,423 dollars and in 2023–24, 546,970,797 dollars.

Spending (voted and statutory) over time (thousands of dollars)
2018–19 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22 2022–23 2023–24
Statutory 14,842,625 80,710,434 56,026,923 16,019,930 15,846,827 15,480,495
Voted 712,757,815 838,624,665 815,753,281 1,039,443,721 651,514,423 546,970,797
Total 727,600,440 919,335,099 871,780,204 1,055,463,651 667,361,250 562,451,292

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned spending for each of Public Safety Canada’s core responsibilities and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Budgetary planning summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19 expenditures 2019–20 expenditures 2020–21 forecast spending 2021–22 budgetary spending (as indicated in Main Estimates) 2021–22 planned spending 2022–23 planned spending 2023–24 planned spending
National Security 24,915,803 22,139,061 28,006,751 24,246,094 24,246,094 23,233,313 23,408,810
Community Safety 297,109,222 272,306,142 314,469,029 417,496,295 417,496,295 418,395,422 331,512,579
Emergency Management 338,295,648 555,007,610 458,905,110 549,603,961 549,603,961 162,159,494 145,793,822
Subtotal 660,320,673 849,452,813 801,380,890 991,346,350 991,346,350 603,788,229 500,715,211
Internal Services 67,279,767 69,882,286 70,399,314 64,117,301 64,117,301 63,573,021 61,736,081
Total 727,600,440 919,335,099 871,780,204 1,055,463,651 1,055,463,651 667,361,250 562,451,292

The 2021-22 Main Estimates and Planned Spending are $183.7 million (21%) higher than the 2020-21 Forecast Spending. The increase is mainly attributable to the following increases: $240.8 million in funding levels for the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA) program resulting from provinces and territories’ forecasts for expected disbursements; $30.4 million in funding for the relocation and accommodations for the Government Operations Centre, of which the majority will be allotted to Public Services and Procurement Canada for the implementation of the project; as well as $58.8 million from the timing of a transfer to the RCMP in 2020-21. These increases are offset by a decrease of $170.0 million in financial support to the Canadian Red Cross to support efforts to respond to Canadians’ needs from the COVID-19 crisis, floods and wildfires.

The decrease of $388.1 million (37%) in planned spending from 2021-22 to 2022-23 is mainly attributable to a decrease of $345.8 million in funding levels for the DFAA contribution program and to the expiry of the funding of $20.9 million for the National Disaster Mitigation Program. Public Safety Canada regularly consults with provinces and territories to ensure funding levels meet disbursement requirements under the DFAA legislation, and aligns funding levels accordingly.

Lastly, the decrease of $104.9 million (16%) in planned spending from 2022-23 to 2023-24 is mainly attributable to the expiry of the funding of $78.0 million for the Initiative to Take Action Against Gun and Gang Violence as well as $13.3 million for the completion of the relocation and accommodations for the Government Operations Centre.

The figure below displays the allocation of Public Safety Canada's planned spending by program for 2021-22

Image description

This graph depicts the planned spending for 2021–22 for the Department and for each core responsibility. Planned spending for Public Safety Canada is 1.055 billion dollars. Planned spending for the core responsibility of National Security is 24 million dollars, which represents 2 per cent of the total. Planned spending for the core responsibility of Community Safety is 417 million dollars, which represents 40 per cent of the total. Planned spending for the core responsibility of Emergency Management is 550 million dollars, which represents 52 per cent of the total. Planned spending for Internal Services is 64 million dollars, which represents 6 per cent of the total.

Planned human resources

The following table shows actual, forecast and planned full-time equivalents (FTEs) for each core responsibility in Public Safety Canada’s departmental results framework and to Internal Services for the years relevant to the current planning year.

Human resources planning summaryFootnote 30 for core responsibilities and Internal Services
Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2018–19 actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 actual full time equivalents 2020–21 forecast full-time equivalents 2021–22 planned full-time equivalents 2022–23 planned full-time equivalents 2023–24 planned full-time equivalents
National Security 223 181 178 178 171 173
Community Safety 271 287 296 296 284 266
Emergency Management 252 264 259 249 234 231
Subtotal 746 732 733 723 689 670
Internal Services 434 473 469 477 477 473
Total 1,180 1,205 1,202 1,200 1,166 1,143

In fiscal year 2020-21, Public Safety Canada’s forecasted FTEs included the addition of FTEs related to new programs received through Supplementary Estimates. These programs include Canada’s Flood Risk Plan, the National Disaster Mitigation Program, funding which enables a continued response to the recommendations from the Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, and the relocation and accommodations for the Government Operations Center.

Overall planned FTEs in 2021-22 will see a decrease of 2 FTEs (0.2%) from 1,202 forecast FTEs in 2020-21 to 1,200 in 2021-22 indicating stable FTE levels. In 2022-23 planned FTEs will further decrease by 34 FTEs (2.8%) from 1,200 in 2021-22 to 1,166 in 2022-23. This decrease is a result of sunsetting programs for which funding will end in 2021-22 such as the Canada’s Flood Risk Plan, Protecting Children from Sexual Exploitation and the National Security Framework. In 2023-24 planned FTEs will further decrease by 23 FTEs (2.0%) from 1,166 in 2022-23 to 1,143 in 2023-24. This decrease is a result of sunsetting programs for which funding will end in 2022-23 such as the Initiative to Take Action Against Gun and Gang Violence.

Estimates by vote

Information on Public Safety Canada’s organizational appropriations is available in the Main Estimates.

Future-oriented Condensed statement of operations

The future-oriented condensed statement of operations provides an overview of Public Safety Canada’s operations for 2020–21 to 2021–22.

The amounts for forecast and planned results in this statement of operations were prepared on an accrual basis. The amounts for forecast and planned spending presented in other sections of the Departmental Plan were prepared on an expenditure basis. Amounts may therefore differ.

A more detailed future-oriented statement of operations and associated notes, including a reconciliation of the net cost of operations to the requested authorities, are available on Public Safety Canada’s website.

Future-oriented Condensed statement of operations for the year ending March 31, 2022 (dollars)
Financial information 2020–21 forecast results 2021–22 planned results Difference (2021–22 planned results minus 2020–21 forecast results)
Total expenses 910,420,962 859,551,391 (50,869,571)
Total revenues 2,265,000 2,321,000 (56,000)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 908,155,962 857,230,391 (50,925,571)

The difference of $51 million in the expenses between 2020–21 and 2021–22 is mainly due to the fact that Public Safety Canada intends to review future funding levels for the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA) and, if required, seek the appropriate level of funding to meet its obligations under the DFAA program.

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister(s):
The Honourable William Sterling Blair, P.C., C.O.M., M.P.
Institutional head:
Mr. Rob Stewart
Ministerial portfolio:
Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Enabling instrument(s):
Year of incorporation/commencement:
2003

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on Public Safety Canada’s website.

For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the “Minister’s mandate letter” as well as the “Supplementary mandate letter” released on January 15, 2021.

Operating context

Information on the operating context is available on Public Safety Canada’s website.

Reporting framework

Public Safety Canada’s approved departmental results framework and program inventory for 2021–22 are as follows.

2021-22 Reporting Framework by Core Responsibility

Results Framework
National Security Community Safety Emergency Management

RESULT: National Security threats are understood and reduced

  • Canada’s ranking on the Global Terrorism Index
  • Percentage of the population who think that the Government of Canada is transparent in explaining national security concerns to Canadians
  • Percentage of the population who think that the right mechanisms are in place to prevent terrorism acts in Canada
  • Percentage of the population who think that the right mechanisms are in place to respond to terrorism acts in Canada
  • Percentage of partners indicating that Public Safety Canada provided effective policy leadership and operational coordination on national security issues
  • Critical Infrastructure Resilience Score
  • Percentage of partners indicating that Public Safety Canada provides effective leadership in advancing Canada’s cyber security interests
  • Canada’s ranking in the Cybersecurity Index

RESULT: Community safety practices are strengthened

  • Percentage of stakeholders who reported consulting Public Safety Canada research or policy documents to inform their decision making
  • Percentage of stakeholders reporting good or very good results of projects funded through Public Safety Canada's Community Resilience Fund, in line with project objectives
  • Number of research products available to the Canadian public on radicalization to violence and efforts to prevent and counter it

RESULT: Canadian communities are safe

  • Crime Severity Index
  • Percentage of Canadians who think that crime in their neighbourhood has decreased

RESULT: Crime is prevented and addressed in populations/ communities most at-risk

  • Percentage of programs where participants experienced positive changes in risk and protective factors related to offending
  • Percentage of Public Safety Canada-funded progProgram Inventoryrams targeting at-risk populations that achieve the intended participation rate
  • Difference between police reported crime in First Nation communities and police reported crime in the rest of Canada

RESULT: Canada can effectively mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from all-hazards events

  • Percentage of stakeholders indicating that the National Exercise Program exercise cycle increased their preparedness for an event
  • Percentage of stakeholders indicating that the National Exercise Program exercise cycle increased their ability to respond to an event
  • Percentage of flooding events eligible for cost sharing under Public Safety Canada’s disaster recovery program for which provinces and territories implement mitigation projects
  • Percentage of Canadians who are aware of risks facing their household
  • Percentage of Canadians who have taken measures to respond to risks facing their household
  • Percentage of stakeholders indicating that the Government Operations Centre (GOC) provided effective leadership and coordination for events affecting the national interest
  • Percentage of stakeholders who found that the information, guidance, and decision support provided by the Government Operations Centre (GOC) increased the effectiveness of their response efforts
Program Inventory
National Security Community Safety Emergency Management

National Security Leadership

Critical Infrastructure

Cyber Security

Crime Prevention

Law Enforcement and Policing

Serious and Organized Crime

Border Policy

Indigenous Policing

Corrections

Emergency Prevention/Mitigation

Emergency Preparedness

Emergency Response/Recovery

Changes to the approved reporting framework since 2020–21

Public Safety Canada has not made any changes to the approved reporting framework since 2020-21.

Supporting information on the program inventory

Supporting information on planned expenditures, human resources, and results related to Public Safety Canada’s program inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables will soon be available on Public Safety Canada’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

Public Safety Canada’s Departmental Plan does not include information on tax expenditures that relate to its planned results for 2021–22.

Tax expenditures are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance, and the Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for government­wide tax expenditures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report provides detailed information on tax expenditures, including objectives, historical background and references to related federal spending programs, as well as evaluations, research papers and gender-based analysis. The tax measures presented in this report are solely the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

Mailing address

269 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
K1A 0P8

Telephone:

General enquiries: 613-944-4875 or 1-800-830-3118

Media enquiries: 613-991-0657

National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC): 1-800-830-3118

National Office for Victims: 1-866-525-0554

Teletypewriter (TTY): 1-866-865-5667

Fax:

613-954-5186

Email:

General enquiries: ps.enquires-questions.sp@canada.ca

Media enquiries: 613-991-0657 or ps.mediarelations-relationsaveclesmedias.sp@canada.ca

Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security (CCRS): ps.roundtable-tableronde.sp@canada.ca

National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC): ps.prevention-prevention.sp@canada.ca

Passenger Protect Inquiries Office: PS.PPinquiries-demandesPP.SP@canada.ca

Website(s):

Public Safety Canada

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of a department over a 3‑year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
departmental priority (priorité ministérielle)
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Departmental priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A factor or variable that provides a valid and reliable means to measure or describe progress on a departmental result.
departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
A framework that consists of the department’s core responsibilities, departmental results and departmental result indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on a department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare, the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works and what doesn’t. Experimentation is related to, but distinct form innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2021–22 Departmental Plan, government-wide priorities refers to those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2020 Speech from the Throne, namely: Protecting Canadians from COVID-19; Helping Canadians through the pandemic; Building back better – a resiliency agenda for the middle class; The Canada we’re fighting for.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative in which two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision-making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in the Main Estimates. A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all of the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s core responsibilities and results.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
strategic outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long-term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures can be made.
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