Departmental Results Report 2019-20

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Minister’s message

The Honourable Bill Blair

The past year has brought about significant changes to the way we live, work and interact. The Government of Canada’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic demonstrates our commitment to keeping Canadians safe and is complemented by a wide range of measures to protect the public from other threats. As Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, I am proud to introduce Public Safety Canada’s 2019-20 Departmental Results Report, which highlights these measures.

At the outset of the pandemic, hundreds of Canadians needed to return quickly from Wuhan, China. The Government Operations Centre, housed at Public Safety Canada, coordinated their reception here at home, and played other important roles in the Government’s overall pandemic response. That is on top of coordinating the response to an increasing number of threats and emergencies over the past year, each with unique challenges: significant spring flooding across the country, major snowstorms in Newfoundland and Labrador, evacuations caused by wildfires, and damage and destruction caused by Hurricane Dorian.

As part of the Government’s key public safety commitments to Canadians, in 2019-20 the Department oversaw several legislative initiatives, which have now become law, including Bill C-71 that strengthens Canada’s firearms regime and Bill C-83 to support the transformation of federal corrections, eliminating the practice of administrative and disciplinary segregation in federal correctional institutions. Bill C-59, an Act respecting national security matters, represents another transformative piece of legislation that received Royal Assent in 2019. Thanks to its passage, Canada’s national security and intelligence laws are modernized and enhanced, improving accountability and transparency, strengthening security, and protecting our rights as Canadians.

Public Safety Canada continued to play a leadership role in keeping Canadians safe online. In 2019-20, the Department expanded the National Strategy for the Protection of Children from Sexual Exploitation on the Internet. In March 2020, the Department contributed to the launch of Voluntary Principles to Combat Online Child Sexual Exploitation and Abuse, providing a framework for the digital industry to prevent exploitation on their platforms. Public Safety Canada also played an important role in strengthening the resilience of our physical and digital critical infrastructure, and in keeping Canadians safe from cyber threats. In 2019-20, for example, multiple physical and cyber assessments of infrastructure in Canada were conducted to help improve resilience.

Keeping communities safe also means working with a broad range of partners to prevent and protect against crime. In May 2019, Public Safety Canada launched a hotline to help connect victims and survivors of human trafficking with law enforcement and other critical support services. In September 2019, the Government announced a national, whole-of-government strategy led by Public Safety Canada to combat all forms of human trafficking.

Through Canada’s National Strategy on Countering Radicalization to Violence, the Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence funded important new research and intervention projects across the country.

To support public safety in Indigenous communities, the Department finalized 13 contribution agreements under the Aboriginal Community Safety Development Contribution Program in 2019, funded 15 Indigenous policing facility projects, and, together with all partners over the last two years, helped to add 110 new officers in Indigenous communities, under the First Nations Policing Program. In addition, Public Safety Canada continued to support Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada on the development of a National Action Plan to address violence against Indigenous women and girls.

Combatting drug-impaired driving remained a major focus for the Department this past year. Public Safety Canada supported capacity building among law enforcement agencies, and continued to raise Canadians’ awareness of the dangers and consequences through our Don’t Drive High campaign. In December 2019, that campaign won a prestigious international award from the Fédération Internationale de l’Automobile.

The following pages offer a detailed look at these and other accomplishments. I encourage all Canadians to read this report to learn more about how Public Safety Canada is helping to keep them safe.

The Honourable William Sterling Blair, P.C., C.O.M., M.P
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Results at a glance and operating context

Snapshot: 2019-20 Actual Expenditures per Core Responsibility and Internal Services

Snapshot: 2018-19 Actual Expenditures

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This graphic describes Public Safety Actual Expenditures for 2019-20, broken down per Core Responsibility and Internal Services, for a total amount of $919.3M. National Security accounts for 2% ($22.1M) and is divided as following: 17% for Cyber Security, 26% for Critical Infrastructure, and 57% for National Security Leadership. Community Safety accounts for 30% ($272.3M) and is divided as following: 3% for Law Enforcement and Policing, 5% for Border Policy, 5% for Corrections, 10% for Serious and Organized Crime, 31% for Crime Prevention, and 46% for Indigenous Policing. Emergency Management accounts for 60% ($555.0M) and is divided as following: 3% for Emergency Preparedness, 18% for Emergency Prevention, and 79% for Emergency Response. As per Internal Services, it accounts for 8% ($69.9M) and is divided as following: 3% for Acquisition Management, 4% for Information Management, 6% for Legal, 7% for Financial Management, 10% for Human Resources Management, 11% for Real Property Management, 12% for Communications, 16% for Information Technology, and 31% for Management and Oversight.

N.B due to rounding, combined percentages may not add to 100%.

Snapshot: Public Safety Canada

Snapshot: 2018-19 Actual Expenditures

Image description

The graphic illustrates the PS employees divided by age categories:

  • 16% are less than 30 years old
  • 28% are between 30 and 39 years old
  • 32% are between 40 and 49 years old
  • 19% are between 50 and 59 years old
  • 5% are older than 60 years old
  • Median age is 50 years old

The graphic also illustrates the Employment Equity groups representations within PS compared to the workforce availability

  • Aboriginal Peoples: 4% (vs 3.9%)
  • Person with disabilities: 6% (vs 4.0%)
  • Visible minorities: 13% (vs 14.3%)
  • Women: 58% (vs 60.7%)
  • Percentage of PS employees working in the National Capital Region: 89%
  • Percentage of PS employees working in the regions: 11%
  • Percentage of PS employees who meet language requirements for position: 69%
  • Percentage of PS employees who stayed with Public Safety Canada: 72%
  • Turnover*: 25%
  • Average time in the Department: 4.9 years
  • Average time in a position: 3.0 years
  • Percentage of non-executive: 94%
  • Percentage of executives: 6%

N.B.: due to rounding, combined percentages may not add to 100%

* Due to a lag in administrative processing of employees transferring in or out of the department, the combined percentage does not add to 100%.

Snapshot: 2019-20 Actual Human Resources

Snapshot: 2019-20 Actual Human Resources

Image description

This graphic describes the Actual Public Safety Human Resources for 2019-20 per Core Responsibility and Internal Services. There is a total of 1,205 Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) Employees who works for the Department. Of those, 181 FTEs (15%) works for National Security, 287 FTEs (24%) who work for Community Safety, 264 FTEs (22%) who work for Emergency Management, along with 473 FTEs (39%) who work for Internal Services.

N.B.: due to rounding, combined percentages may not add to 100%

In 2019-20, Public Safety Canada once again played a key role in the development, coordination and implementation of policies and programs to strengthen national security, community safety and emergency management in Canada.

Canada faces a wide-range of public safety challenges, including complex and rapidly evolving threats in cyberspace. As malicious cyber tools become increasingly accessible, and as rates of cybercrime continue to rise, there is a corresponding and growing threat to Canada's economic well-being. As major parts of Canada’s economy, critical infrastructure and essential services move increasingly online every year, governments, businesses, organizations and Canadians may face increasing vulnerabilities, as well as novel threats to Canada’s national security and public safety. Addressing this issue requires federal leadership on cyber security; clear roles, responsibilities and accountability mechanisms; and measures to improve the security and resilience of Canada’s vital assets, infrastructure and systems.

Recent terrorist threats and incidents have highlighted the importance of advancing Canada’s efforts to counter radicalization to violence. The principal terrorist threats to Canada continued to stem from individuals or groups who are inspired by violent ideologies and terrorist groups, such as Daesh or al-Qaeda. While Canada’s terrorist threat environment has remained relatively stable, the April 2018 van attack in Toronto was a reminder that violent acts inspired by extremists' views are not exclusively linked to any one particular religious, political or cultural ideology. Monitoring and addressing these threats requires strong and ongoing cooperation among members of Canada’s security and intelligence community.

Over the past number of years, organized criminal groups have become more complex and sophisticated, as have the types of crimes they commit. New and evolving technology is now being used to commit crime and facilitate communication between criminal groups; for example, communications devices are frequently used to target sensitive, personal and financial information in order to conduct identity theft and fraud. Organized criminal groups are also expanding into legitimate business activities and branching out into new markets in Canada. Strong, informed and multifaceted responses are needed to combat these organizations at both the national and international levels.

Given our geographic size and diversity, the possibilities of severe weather events and natural disasters are a persistent reality for Canada and Canadians. These events are resulting in greater damages and expenses, as evidenced by the 2019 floods in Quebec, Ontario, and New Brunswick, as well as the winter storm in Newfoundland and Labrador. Collaboration between federal, provincial, territorial and municipal partners, as well as Indigenous communities, is vital in our efforts to mitigate, respond to and recover from emergencies and help build safer and more resilient communities across this vast terrain.

In recent months, Canadians have faced extraordinary changes to the way they live, work, and interact with each other. Many faced challenges associated with shifting towards remote work; caring for family, friends and loved ones; and protecting their health and wellbeing in these unprecedented times. In March 2020, the Government Operations Centre (GOC), housed at Public Safety Canada, launched into immediate pandemic response operations. Since then, the GOC has worked non-stop to coordinate the speedy return of Canadians travelling abroad, provide support to healthcare and long-term healthcare facilities, and monitor COVID-19 related outbreaks in food supply and manufacturing facilities. These efforts have been undertaken simultaneously with the GOC’s standard duties of coordinating Canada’s response to natural emergencies and threats.

Also in March 2020, the Government of Canada directed the federal public service to work from home where possible in order to limit the spread of COVID-19. Despite these changes, Public Safety Canada has been working tirelessly to ensure that Canada’s national security, public safety and emergency preparedness priorities and plans continue to be advanced, and that Canadians are safe and secure as they adapt to this new health environment.

Within this operating context, Public Safety Canada identified four corporate risks in its Corporate Risk Profile, set out in the 2019-20 Departmental Plan:

  1. There is a risk that some program outcomes relying on the actions of partners will not be met;
  2. There is a risk that Public Safety will be unable to keep pace with and take advantage of technological advances;
  3. There is a risk that the Department may not respond effectively to the pace and magnitude of change in the evolving all-hazards threat environment; and
  4. There is a risk that the Department will not attract and retain the employees required to achieve its organizational objectives.

The Department also identified mitigation strategies designed to address some of the concerns from which the risks arose. Despite challenges caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, Public Safety Canada achieved the majority of the targets set by the mitigation strategies in its 2019-20 Corporate Risk Profile. For instance, to address the first corporate risk of program outcomes not being met, the GOC developed a Concept of Operations Plan for its Event Response Procedures, which could be adopted by partners. This plan was put to use during the COVID-19 pandemic to assist in coordinating partner actions, which in turn helped ensure that program outcomes were being met.

Given the evolving nature of today’s operating landscape, Public Safety Canada aims to continuously adapt its risk management strategies and keep pace with the changes by continuing to develop a robust risk-management culture.

Corporate priorities

Priority 1: Advance the federal government's efforts in protecting Canadians and Canada's critical infrastructure from cyber threats and cybercrime.

To advance efforts to enhance the resilience of Canada's critical infrastructure, the Department:

  • Delivered a range of exercises targeted towards critical infrastructure professionals, including several symposiums, workshops and Webinars relating to Industrial Control Systems, as well as a Remote Resilience Exercise;
  • Released the Enhancing Critical Infrastructure Resilience to Insider Risk guide for the use of national security and emergency management stakeholder groups, and completed 30 Regional Resilience Assessment Program Cyber Assessments;
  • Released the National Cyber Security Action Plan; and
  • Increased the security and resiliency of Canadian cyber systems by developing an innovative and adaptive approach to cyber systems, and by providing effective leadership, governance and collaboration on cyber security issues across Canada via the National Cyber Security Strategy.

Priority 2: Continue to advance countering radicalization to violence and counter-terrorism efforts with all levels of government, internal partners, and other stakeholders.

To advance the prevention of violence and counter-terrorism efforts, the Department:

  • Contributed to international discussions on Canadian Extremist Travellers as part of the multinational Foreign Terrorist Fighters Working Group;
  • Collaborated with the Five Eyes alliance and other partners on a range of issues relevant to Canada’s national security priorities;
  • Became a founding member of the Independent Advisory Committee for the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism; and
  • Signed multiple project agreements to counter radicalization to violence both online and offline through the Community Resilience Fund, including with Tech Against Terrorism and Yorktown Family Services.

Priority 3: Strengthen community resilience to emergencies in collaboration with provinces and territories, Indigenous communities and municipalities.

To modernize emergency management in Canada, the Department:

Priority 4: Increase the efficiency and effectiveness of community safety, with a focus on at-risk and vulnerable populations, including Indigenous peoples, as well as those with mental health issues in the criminal justice system.

To advance community safety, particularly for vulnerable and at-risk populations, the Department:

Priority 5: Continue to strengthen an ethical and values-based departmental culture focused on respect, people-centered practices, mental health, and workplace wellness.

To continue implementing its Values and Ethics Strategic Framework and Action Plan, the Department:

  • Launched the first iteration of Public Safety Canada’s annual Diversity and Inclusion Week in November 2019;
  • Hosted a diversity speaker series in January 2020, which included an information session on Public Safety Canada’s Accessibility Strategy; a panel discussion on Many Voices One Mind; and a chat with Canada’s Ambassador for Women, Peace and Security;
  • Began efforts pertaining to the provision or referral of psychological supports for employees impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic;
  • Developed training content for the “Leadership 20/20” program, which focuses on values and ethics, conflicts of interest, harassment, disclosure, and political activities in the workplace; and
  • Created Public Safety Canada’s Office of the Ombudsman, who supports employees by providing a trusted space for the discussion of workplace issues, and helping to navigate existing information and programs in order to resolve workplace issues.

Priority 6: Ensure a strong focus on results through effective performance measurement and sound management practices consistent with the federal government's renewed focus on results.

To ensure a strong focus on results and effective management practices, the Department:

  • Increased performance measurement in corporate services/processes and policy development and implementation.

For more information on Public Safety Canada’s priorities, core responsibilities, and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Results: what we achieved

Public Safety Canada’s activities and results are structured under three Core Responsibilities (National Security, Community Safety, and Emergency Management) and Internal Services.

National Security

Description

Public Safety Canada develops policy, legislation and programs to support Canada’s capacity to respond to a range of national security threats directed against Canadians, our critical infrastructure and our cyber systems while advancing national counter terrorism efforts.

Results

National Cyber Security Strategy

Canada’s National Cyber Security Strategy (NCSS) released in June 2018, established three goals in response to evolving threats, emerging opportunities and the need for collaborative action in the cyber realm: (1) Secure and Resilient Canadian Systems; (2) An Innovative and Adaptive Cyber Ecosystem; and (3) Effective Leadership and Collaboration. In 2019-20, Public Safety Canada advanced a number of initiatives in support of these goals.

In August 2019, Public Safety released the National Cyber Security Action Plan (2019-2024). By outlining initiatives and milestones which support each of the Strategy’s three goals, the “Action Plan” presents a roadmap of how the Department will achieve and maintain its vision of security and prosperity in the digital age.

In addition, Public Safety Canada launched the Cyber Security Cooperation Program with $10.3 million available for five years to support projects which aim to increase innovation and cooperation, while also positioning Canada as a global leader in cyber security. A call for applications for the program was completed in August 2019, and funding agreements with successful applicants are now being developed.

Critical Infrastructure Resilience

Enhancing the Resilience of Canada’s Critical Infrastructure

  • 55 Regional Resilience Assessment Program cyber assessments;
  • 30 cyber security assessments;
  • 24 geospatial products for critical infrastructure stakeholders;
  • 11 Virtual Risk Analysis Cell Infrastructure of Concern assessments;
  • 4 virtual installments of the Industrial Control Systems Security Webinar Series, reaching over 600 cybersecurity professionals; and
  • 2 cybersecurity tabletop exercises for the transportation and energy sectors.

Following the guidance outlined in the Enhancing Canada’s Critical Infrastructure Resilience to Insider Risk report, Public Safety Canada led the development and delivery of the Public Safety Insider Risk Program to raise awareness regarding insider threats, and also support Canada’s critical infrastructure resilience. The Department delivered several presentations to critical infrastructure and emergency management groups in 2019-20, and is currently developing an exercise toolkit for stakeholder use, which is to be released in winter 2021.

In May 2019, the Department delivered a national symposium on Industrial Control Systems (ICS) in Charlottetown (PEI), and delivered four stand-alone ICS technical workshops in Laval (QC), Halifax (NS), Vancouver (BC) and Ottawa (ON) between June 2019 and March 2020.

Public Safety Canada also hosted the National Cross Sector Forum and meetings of the Multi-Sector Network in order to bring together national leaders from each of the ten critical infrastructure sectors. These events allowed for the sharing of knowledge and lessons learned, and further strengthened collaboration with respect to national security and public safety. In spring 2019, Public Safety Canada led the “Nexus Vitalis” exercise series in three regions (Saskatchewan, BC and Atlantic) for 130 participants, bringing together provinces, municipalities and critical infrastructure stakeholders to build and reinforce partnerships when managing a potential weather-related issue (such as wildfires, winter storms, flooding).

To ensure the resilience of Canada’s critical infrastructure, Public Safety Canada conducted on-site assessments of critical infrastructure facilities for 10 sectors identified in Canada’s National Strategy on Critical Infrastructure. These assessments are part of the Regional Resilience Assessment Program, which assists organizations in measuring and improving their resilience to all hazards in Canada, such as cyber threats, accidental or intentional man-made events, and natural catastrophes. In 2019-2020, Public Safety Canada provided assessments to 55 recipients, which included over 1,300 resilience-enhancement options, observations and recommendations to mitigate any risks found.

Counter-Terrorism
Federal Terrorism Response Plan

Public Safety Canada continued efforts to coordinate an effective counter-terrorism response through the ongoing operationalization of the Federal Terrorism Response Plan in collaboration with government partners and the emergency management community.

In addition, Public Safety Canada continued to work closely with Global Affairs Canada, Canada’s security and intelligence community and agencies, and international partners on the issue of Canadian extremist travellers.

Terrorist Listing Program

The Terrorist Listing Program is an important tool in the fight against terrorism, and sends a strong message that Canada will not tolerate acts of violence either at home or abroad. During the reporting period, Public Safety Canada worked closely with its Portfolio agencies and other federal partners to further enhance the Terrorist Listing Program. In June 2019, five new groups were added to Canada’s List of Terrorist Entities, including three Iran-backed groups, and for the first time, two ideologically motivated violent extremist (IMVE) groups known as Blood & Honour and Combat 18. Public Safety Canada also worked with partners to operationalize the amendments made by Bill C-59, An Act Respecting National Security Matters, which enhance the terrorist listing regime’s efficiency and streamline administrative processes. The Department will continue to provide policy advice on emerging terrorist entities and groups, including IMVE groups.

Bias-Sensitive Approach to Language Review

To address concerns raised by the 2018 Public Report on the Terrorism Threat to Canada, the Department was tasked with reviewing language used throughout the Government of Canada to describe extremism. This included reviewing what has previously been done in Canada, examining language used by international partners, and consulting with external experts.

After completing the review, Public Safety Canada adopted a bias-sensitive approach to terminology which focuses on intent and ideology when describing violent extremist threats. The Department also consulted with the National Security Transparency Advisory Group to inform future public communication pertaining to national security threats.

Implementation of Bill C-59

Establishment of a Strategic Coordination Centre on Information Sharing (SCCI)

  • Following the enactment of Bill C-59, Public Safety Canada launched the SCCI in June 2019.
  • The Centre will assist government institutions in implementing the new Security of Canada Information Disclosure Act (SCIDA).
  • Activities of the Centre include:
    • Enhancing responsible information sharing through interdepartmental collaboration;
    • Developing tools for sharing national security information using the SCIDA; and
    • Delivering training to government institutions on how to apply the SCIDA.

Bill C-59, An Act Respecting National Security Matters, received Royal Assent in June 2019, enacting a range of measures to modernize and enhance Canada’s national security architecture. Public Safety Canada has worked collaboratively with its partners to implement the Bill, including launching a new Strategic Coordination Centre on Information Sharing to facilitate national security information sharing between government institutions.

Another important milestone accomplished by Bill C-59 was the coming into force of the Avoiding Complicity in Mistreatment by Foreign Entities Act. The corresponding Orders in Council regarding the disclosure of, request for, and use of information were issued to the Deputy Minister of Public Safety on September 4, 2019. Public Safety Canada’s 2019 Annual Report on the Directions for Avoiding Complicity in Mistreatment by Foreign Entities was published in May 2020.

National Security Transparency Commitment

In July 2019, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness announced the launch of a National Security Transparency Advisory Group (NSTAG), and the appointment of its eleven members. The expert Advisory Group is mandated to provide advice to Public Safety Canada’s Deputy Minister with regards to the implementation of the National Security Transparency Commitment, which aims to enhance transparency in the national security community.

Following the creation of the group, the Department hosted the NSTAG’s first three meetings, which included discussions with civil society representatives, members of the media, academics and senior officials from national security institutions. The summary meeting reports have now been published online. Following delays due to COVID-19, NSTAG is expecting to produce its first yearly report in fall 2020.

Public Safety Canada also organized five expert panels at the Open Government Global Partnership Summit in May 2019, which led to several important recommendations on how to ensure transparency and accountability in Canadian national security departments and agencies.

Enhanced Passenger Protect Program

Enhancing the Passenger Protect Program

  • In 2019-20, Public Safety Canada developed IM/IT requirements for the Canadian Travel Number (CTN) program (web portal, case management application).
  • Both the CTN redress mechanism and the centralized screening solution are on track to be implemented in late 2020.

Public Safety Canada worked closely with federal partners, including the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), Transport Canada, and Shared Services Canada, on the Enhanced Passenger Protect Program, with the goals of designing and building the technology and infrastructure for both the Canadian Travel Number (CTN) program, and the centralized screening solution.

Public Safety Canada is on track to implement the remaining provisions of the Secure Air Travel Act, which was modified by Bill C-59, and the related regulatory framework for the screening of air passengers. The centralized screening system will be implemented in late 2020, and will be supported by the CTN program, which will be available to the public in order to facilitate air travel screening process. This CTN will assist those travellers that have been the subject of supplemental identity verification upon check-in, or who could not use online check-in services.

Economic Security

To ensure that the Government of Canada has the tools and resources it needs to protect against economic-based security threats, Public Safety Canada has begun to implement the projects, programs and investments outlined in Budget 2019 including:

International Partnerships

Public Safety Canada continued to advance its international partnerships, including through a wide range of engagement by officials, and participation of the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness in the 2019 G7 Interior Ministers’ Meeting in Paris and the Five Country Ministerial 2019 in London, where shared priorities, including cyber threats, countering violent extremism and hostile state activity were discussed. Public Safety Canada and Global Affairs Canada co-led Canada’s participation in the semi-annual G7 Roma-Lyon Group meeting of experts on counter-terrorism and organized crime.

The Department also supported the Minister’s participation in a virtual Five Country Ministerial conference, held in June 2020, where discussions included hostile activities by state actors, encryption, and online harms from COVID-19 (including disinformation, child sexual exploitation and abuse, and cybercrime).

Combatting Money Laundering

As part of the Government’s commitment to strengthening Canada’s anti-money laundering (AML) regime, Budget 2019 allocated $24 million over five years for the creation of the AML Action Coordination and Enforcement (ACE) team. This five-year pilot project aims to strengthen inter-agency efforts to combat money laundering and financial crimes in Canada. Led by Public Safety Canada, the ACE team currently includes experienced anti-money laundering professionals from Public Safety Canada, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada (FINTRAC), the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA), Public Services and Procurement Canada – Forensic Accounting Management Group (PSPC-FAMG), and the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions (OSFI).

The ACE team, under this initiative, researched and completed an in-depth assessment of gaps and challenges in addressing money laundering in Canada, which covered five key areas: governance, resources, coordination, prioritization, and information sharing. This overarching assessment included extensive outreach and engagement with Canada’s AML/Anti-Terrorist Financing (ATF) regime partners and stakeholders in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario, Québec, as well as with other leaders internationally. This research and engagement identified best practices and key areas where Public Safety Canada could maximize its efforts to comprehensively strengthen the AML/ATF regime, as the initiative moves to its operational phase (expected in 2021). The operational phase is expected to provide coordination and support to AML partners through the alignment of policies and priorities across the AML Regime; improvement of information sharing and access to resources; and enhancement of AML knowledge, skills and expertise.

National Security: Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

Public Safety Canada continues to advance work to support bias sensitivity and GBA+ analysis in national security policies, programs and operations.

As part of this effort, Public Safety Canada organized a panel discussion with senior officials from the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS), the Privy Council Office, and Public Safety Canada at the Open Government Global Partnership Summit in May 2019. The goal of the panel discussion was to promote Canadian leadership on the enhanced application of GBA+ tools in national security organizations to an international audience. Following the Summit, Public Safety Canada has continued to work within the domestic national security community to create a tailored suite of tools for national security practitioners. As part of this work, Public Safety Canada hosted an expert symposium on “Addressing Unconscious Bias, Inclusion and Diversity in National Security” in March 2020. The symposium, which was attended by over 100 experts from academia, civil society and government, served to deepen dialogue and cooperation among experts on bias, and enhance intersectional analysis in the national security space.

National Security: Experimentation

No experiments were conducted under the National Security Core Responsibility, as Public Safety Canada was still in the process of implementing a new approach and raising awareness about experimentation in the 2019-20 reporting year.

National Security: Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual resultsFootnote 1 2018–19 Actual resultsFootnote 2 2019–20 Actual results
National security threats are understood and reduced Canada’s ranking on the Global Terrorism Index 66 March 31, 2020 57 54Footnote 3 N/AFootnote 4
Canada’s ranking in the Cybersecurity Index Average score of G7 Nations or higher March 31, 2020 9 N/A N/AFootnote 5
Percentage of the population who think that the right mechanisms are in place to prevent and respond to terrorism acts in Canada TBDFootnote 6 March 31, 2020 N/A 44.7%Footnote 7 53.8%Footnote 8
Percentage of partners indicating that Public Safety Canada provided effective policy leadership and operational coordination on national security issues 75% March 31, 2020 N/A 70.5% N/AFootnote 9
Critical Infrastructure Resilience ScoreFootnote 10 34.32-41.94 March 31, 2020 37.13 35.91 36.01
National Security: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019–20 Main Estimates 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) 2019–20 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
18,590,543 18,590,543 26,101,072 22,139,061 3,548,518

The difference of $3.5 million between planned spending of $18.6 million and actual spending of $22.1 million is primarily due to an increase in funding for the implementation of the National Cyber Security Strategy ($5.1 million), Protecting Canada’s National Security ($1.9 million), and Passenger Protect Program ($1.8 million), which is primarily offset by a lapse in the Cyber Security Cooperation Program ($2.5 million).

National Security: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
162 181 19

The variance of 19 FTEs between planned FTEs of 162 and actual FTEs of 181 is due primarily to the continuation of hiring to support implementation of the Passenger Protect Program and of the National Cyber Security Strategy, as well as for increased assessments under the Investment Canada Act and the implementation of an Economic Security Task Force.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Community Safety

Description

Public Safety Canada provides national coordination to help Canadian communities and stakeholders respond to crime and build community resilience, promote the safety and security of Canadian communities and institutions, enhance the integrity of Canada’s borders, and support the provision of policing services to Indigenous communities.

Results

National Crime Prevention Strategy

Public Safety Canada continued to advance programs which address gaps in services to vulnerable and at-risk populations. This included the development and implementation of projects to prevent or reduce the impacts of youth gangs, youth violence, youth bullying, and youth cyberbullying amongst Indigenous and vulnerable populations through the National Crime Prevention Strategy. As of March 2020, 30 project agreements had been finalized.

Public Safety Canada also worked with the Federal, Provincial, Territorial (FPT) Working Group on Crime Prevention to develop a new Community Safety and Well-Being Strategic Partnership Framework for FPT crime prevention collaboration. In December 2019, FPT Deputy Ministers Responsible for Justice and Public Safety approved the National Action Plan Final Report (2013-2018), which detailed the Working Group’s accomplishments over the five-year period.

In 2019-20, the Working Group met via teleconference six times to discuss shared crime prevention priorities and objectives for the coming years and held an in-person meeting in Toronto to focus on the development of the Community Safety and Well-Being approach. Additionally, the Public Safety Canada Crime Prevention Research and Evaluation Unit undertook the following research projects:

A Request for Proposals (RFP) for the Indigenous Crime Prevention and Evaluation Practices research project was delayed as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. The RFP will instead be publicized in 2020-21.

Countering Radicalization to Violence

Tech Against Terrorism

  • In June 2019, Public Safety Canada announced $1 million in funding to Tech Against Terrorism.
  • This funding will be used to create a digital repository that will notify smaller companies when new terrorist content is detected, allowing them to quickly remove it.
  • This funding will help achieve Canada’s commitments under the Christchurch Call to Action.

The Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence continued to advance the priorities set out in the National Strategy on Countering Radicalization to Violence. In addition, the Community Resilience Fund continued to support research and programs which build upon evidence and knowledge bases, improve local capabilities, and increase capacity to counter radicalization to violence in Canada.

In 2019-20, following a call for applications, six funding agreements with a total funding commitment of $4.8 million were signed, including a $1 million agreement with Tech Against Terrorism.

Other projects funded by Public Safety Canada in 2019-20 included:

Along with international partners (New Zealand, France, the U.S., and the United Kingdom) and leading digital companies (Facebook, Twitter, Microsoft, Google, and Amazon), Public Safety Canada led Canada’s involvement in the re-launch of the Global Internet Forum to Counter Terrorism in September 2019.

Aboriginal Community Safety Planning Initiative

In 2019-20, the Department collaborated closely with vulnerable Indigenous communities across the country in order to build capacity and support the development of Aboriginal Community Safety Plans, which are practical, solution-based plans grounded in the culture and security needs of each community.

Development Officers from the Crime Prevention and Aboriginal Community Safety Program were also directly engaged in coaching and mentoring 16 communities, and related plans for each community were completed or were under development in 2019-20.

The Department supported the implementation of community-led solutions outlined by the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls by completing or initiating 13 contribution agreements which respond to these recommendations.

Overrepresentation of Indigenous People in the Criminal Justice System

To help reduce the overrepresentation of Indigenous people in the criminal justice system, the Indigenous Community Corrections Initiative continued to provide multi-year funding to support alternatives to custody and reintegration projects responsive to the unique circumstances of Indigenous people in Canada. Recipients include First Nations communities, Friendship Centres, Indigenous community-based organizations, community-based healing lodges, and academic institutions.

Public Safety Canada, in collaboration with the Department of Justice and provincial and territorial counterparts, also continued work on the Pan-Canadian Strategy to Address the Overrepresentation of Indigenous People in the Criminal Justice System.

Addressing Violence Against Indigenous Women and Girls

Public Safety Canada continued to provide support to Crown-Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs Canada (CIRNAC) on the development of a National Action Plan to Address Violence Against Indigenous Women and Girls. In particular, the Department has taken a leadership role in gathering input for the following two thematic areas:

Following the release of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls’ (NIMMIWG) Interim Report, Public Safety Canada funded a review of police policies and practices to identify gaps and challenges in the delivery of culturally-competent policing services. Four research projects were funded and completed through this review, with reports available on Public Safety Canada’s departmental web site and shared with law enforcement partners across the country.

The Department, in collaboration with partners, also continued collecting and compiling data with the goal of measuring progress towards increasing the use of restorative justice processes by a minimum 5% over the next three years. The commitment to achieve this was announced by the Federal, Provincial and Territorial (FPT) Ministers of Justice and Public Safety in November 2018.

As co-chairs on the research sub-committee of the FPT Working Group on Restorative Justice, the Department led the development of a jurisdictional survey, data collection, and analysis for a 2012-18 baseline jurisdictional scan report. In January 2020, FPT Ministers Responsible for Justice and Public Safety approved the report, and a research summary will be made available on both the Canadian Intergovernmental Conference Secretariat website and the Public Safety Canada website upon completion.

In 2019-20, the Department conducted two reviews of the federal criminal justice system. The first, which is to be published in 2020-21, focused on the prevalence of individuals with serious mental illnesses in the criminal justice system, approaches to addressing the overrepresentation of this population in the system, as well as gaps in existing services. The second review focused on identifying gaps in services for Indigenous women in federal correctional institutions, and will also be published in 2020-21.

Policing in Indigenous Communities

First Nations Policing Program

  • Advances the Calls for Justice of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls’ Final Report.
  • Supports the Government of Canada’s commitment to reconciliation.

To enhance the safety of Indigenous communities, the Department continued working with provinces, territories and Indigenous communities to deliver the First Nations Policing Program (FNPP).

An additional investment of $291.2 million over five years was announced in 2018, and included funding for up to 110 additional officers, as well as support for officer salaries and equipment. In 2019-2020, 34 additional officers were added to existing community agreements, resulting in a total of 110 new officers added under the FNPP over the last two years.

To improve services to communities and facilitate the role of FNPP officers, Public Safety Canada continued to work with partners such as the RCMP to develop and strengthen relationships, raise awareness of issues faced by these communities, and facilitate collaboration. The Department has involved key FNPP and regional staff in order to establish guidelines for police officers and support the delivery of the FNPP under Community Tripartite Agreements.

Public Safety Canada continued to address safety issues with First Nation and Inuit police facilities under the Funding for First Nation and Inuit Police Facilities Program (FFNIPFP). Under Phase 1 of the Program, Public Safety Canada and provinces and territories (PTs) shared the cost of 15 projects, which were selected based on the urgency of the needs and the threats to the safety of the facility’s occupants. The Department also continued to collaborate with PTs in order to prioritize investments for future years.

The Department also sought input from industry and external stakeholders in order to inform Phase 2 of the FFNIPFP. This input consisted of professional assessments of community-owned facilities which, combined with a set of national merit criteria, will guide funding decisions moving forward. During fall 2019, Public Safety Canada also engaged with industry experts, professionals, and the FNPP Stakeholder Panel in order to select a firm which will conduct a national assessment and ranking of all Band-owned police facilities. A related Request for Information process was initiated in February 2019.

In addition, during the reporting period, Public Safety Canada continued its work through the First Nations Organized Crime Initiative to support the Akwesasne and Kahnawake First Nations in combatting organized crime in and around their communities through funding support for operations, equipment and specialized training.

Taking Action on Gun and Gang Violence

Bill C-71 – An Act to Amend Certain Acts and Regulations in Relation to Firearms

  • The Act received Royal Assent in June 2019.
  • The Act provides practical, targeted and measured steps to help keep Canadians safe by:
    • Expanding background checks to consider a firearm license applicant’s lifetime history; and
    • Requiring businesses to keep point-of-sale records for non-restricted firearms.
  • Work continues to implement this legislation, including technological changes to firearms information systems within the RCMP.

The Guns and Gang Violence Action Fund (GGVAF) is a horizontal initiative led by Public Safety Canada, in collaboration with CBSA and the RCMP. Beginning in 2018-19, $214 million over five years is being made available through the GGVAF to support provincial and territorial initiatives to counter gun and gang violence. In 2019-20, jurisdictions fully utilized their available funding. Public Safety Canada also launched the GGVAF’s Annual Performance Report pilot project, which is an automated tool which allows recipients to submit required reporting information to the Department electronically. Early results are positive, and indicate that funding has enabled jurisdictions to better respond to gun and gang violence. More than half (58%) of the recipients and project partners have integrated knowledge from funded initiatives into their practices or decision-making. The aggregated results of the 2019-20 reporting will assist in building an evidence-base to address some of the prevalent data gaps in the area of gun and gang violence in Canada.

Building on a 2018 national engagement process which focused on reducing violent crimes involving firearms, as well as the resulting public report released in April 2019, the Department developed policy options for a ban on assault-style firearms.

During 2019-20, Public Safety Canada collaborated with Statistics Canada to assess the feasibility of collecting additional data from police services and other governmental organizations on illicit firearms in Canada. With the Department’s support, Statistics Canada produced a report that provided recommendations on expanding the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey in order to collect more data on firearm-related criminal incidents in Canada.

Public Safety Canada also completed a literature review on the effectiveness of firearms regulatory regimes in other jurisdictions and a comprehensive overview of current knowledge on firearm-related violent crime in Canada.

Corrections and Criminal Justice Reform

Bill C-83 – An Act to Amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and Another Act

  • This Act provides:
    • Improved mental health services;
    • Greater health care governance;
    • Clinical autonomy;
    • Patient advocacy services; and
    • Better support for victims.
  • Specifically, it allows for the elimination of administrative and disciplinary segregation in federal correctional institutions.
  • Instead of disciplinary segregation, Structured Intervention Units (SIUs), a new correctional interventions model, has been established to ensure offenders who need to be separated from the general inmate population (for safety reasons) are supported by interventions and mental health-related care that promote their rehabilitation and reintegration into society.

Public Safety Canada supported the transformation of federal corrections through the coming into force and implementation of Bill C-83, An Act to Amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act in November 2019.

Bill C-83 responds to recommendations from the Coroner’s Inquest Touching the Death of Ashley Smith regarding the use of solitary confinement and the treatment of those with mental illness in correctional facilities.

Law Enforcement Modernization

Public Safety Canada worked with the RCMP to permanently establish the Management Advisory Board for the RCMP. This work included drafting and implementing amendments to the RCMP Act that were included in the 2019 Budget Implementation Act, which came into force in July 2019.

The Department worked with the RCMP to develop a proposal to enhance their harassment resolution process and meet amendments to the Canada Labour Code. The RCMP also implemented a new policy requiring the use of external civilian investigators for allegations of sexual harassment, and increased the number of civilian investigators in an effort to improve the independence and timeliness of the harassment resolution process.

Public Safety Canada established three new Municipal Police Service Agreements with municipalities (with populations over 5,000) that qualified under the program parameters, and continued to work closely with the government of British Columbia to facilitate an efficient and orderly transition of police services from the RCMP to an independent municipal police force in the City of Surrey.

During the reporting period, the Department also continued its funding support to provinces for the purposes of DNA analysis and uploading DNA profiles to the National DNA Databank through the Biology Casework Analysis Contribution Program (with Ontario and Quebec) and the Biology Casework Analysis Agreements with provinces where the RCMP provides contract policing services.

Child Sexual Exploitation and Human Trafficking
Child Sexual Exploitation

Further to initiatives announced in Budget 2019, the Department began developing a national campaign to raise Canadians’ awareness of online child sexual exploitation (CSE) and reduce the stigma associated with reporting such cases. In support of the campaign, the Department conducted public opinion research in the winter/spring of 2020 to gain a better understanding of Canadians’ knowledge and attitudes towards online CSE and abuse.

Public Safety Canada also led engagement with the digital industry to develop tools to better prevent online CSE: specifically, the Department worked with Five Eyes alliance partners and representatives from the digital industry (Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Roblox, Snap, and Twitter) to develop a set of principles — known as the Voluntary Principles to Combat Online Child Sexual Exploitation and Abuse — which provide a common and consistent framework to combat online CSE, as well as drive collective action between governments and industry partners.

Human Trafficking

National Strategy to Combat Human Trafficking

  • Announced in September 2019, the Government of Canada is investing just over $57 million over 5 years, with $10.3 million ongoing, to combat human trafficking.
  • Key initiatives include:
    • Launch of a national public awareness campaign;
    • Enhanced grants and contribution funding for trauma-informed support services and at-risk youth initiatives;
    • Development of training tools and resources for key sectors to support the identification of potential human trafficking victims;
    • Enhanced research and data collection to increase knowledge of the crime;
    • Capacity-building to support detection and investigation of suspected human trafficking cases; and
    • Enhanced international engagement on the issue.

The National Strategy to Combat Human Trafficking is a whole-of-government approach led by Public Safety Canada to bring together federal anti-human trafficking activities under one comprehensive framework. The Department works in partnership with a multitude of federal partners, including: CBSA; Employment and Social Development Canada; FINTRAC; Global Affairs Canada; Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada; the Department of Justice; the RCMP; Statistics Canada; Public Services and Procurement Canada; and Women and Gender Equality Canada.

In fall 2019, the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness appointed an interim Special Advisor to Combat Human Trafficking. The Special Advisor’s role is to provide advice and recommendations to the Government on its efforts, including under the National Strategy, to combat human trafficking and raise awareness domestically and internationally.

The National Strategy has been undertaken in conjunction with other existing efforts to combat human trafficking, including a 2018-19 investment of $14.5 million over five years, and $2.9 million ongoing, for the Canadian Human Trafficking Hotline, operated by the Canadian Centre to End Human Trafficking.

The primary objective of the Hotline is to make it easier for victims and survivors to access the services and supports they need by providing multilingual and central response and referral services, which are available year-round, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. It also supports data collection efforts to better understand the scope of human trafficking in Canada; increases public awareness around human trafficking; and provides a resource for those seeking information on human trafficking.

Public Safety Canada continued to work closely with the Canadian Centre to End Human Trafficking to monitor the Hotline’s operations, and to identify opportunities to raise awareness of this important service.

Border Management

Public Safety Canada continued its close collaboration with Portfolio agencies and other federal departments to ensure the efficient management and integrity of Canada’s border, including efforts related to irregular migration and other cross border immigration and refugee-related matters.

Public Safety Canada, in collaboration with other departments, led the Government’s effort to finalize and implement the Canada-U.S. Agreement on Land, Rail, Marine, and Air Preclearance and the Preclearance Act, 2016.The bilateral Agreement and the Preclearance Act, along with related regulations, came into force on August 15, 2019. The updated preclearance regime will enhance border security, the efficient travel and movement of goods, and allow for the extension of these benefits to non-air modes of transportation.

Following with the coming into force of the Preclearance Act, 2016 Public Safety Canada continued to work with Canadian and U.S. partners to implement the framework and explore the expansion of preclearance.

Cannabis Legalization and Drug Impaired Driving

During the 2019-20 reporting year, Public Safety Canada completed a number of projects related to cannabis legalization and drug impaired driving.

The Department continued to work with Criminal Intelligence Service Canada (CISC) to gather intelligence on the involvement of organized criminal groups in online illicit cannabis sales and in the regulated recreational cannabis market, with a view to sharing insights on criminal trends, methods, practices, and effective interventions.

In October 2019, Public Safety Canada published a report titled Patterns in Cannabis Cryptomarkets in Canada, which focuses on understanding the illicit cannabis trade by Canadians on cryptomarkets both pre-and post-legalization.

5 Step Action Plan: Online Illicit Cannabis Sales Intervention

  • In collaboration with FPT stakeholders, Public Safety Canada developed a 12-month action plan focused on:
    • Information-sharing mechanisms;
    • Cannabis legislation and regulations via enhanced information sources;
    • Outreach activities with social media platforms;
    • Public education and awareness; and
    • Data collection and monitoring

During the last six months of the 2019-20 reporting year, Public Safety Canada continued to work with members of the Online Illicit Cannabis Sales Working Group, which is comprised of key FPT stakeholders (including law enforcement agencies), in order to identify gaps, share relevant information, and develop a clear picture of illicit online sales as well as potential measures to disrupt the online illicit cannabis market.

In 2019, Public Safety Canada published its study on Behaviours and Beliefs Related to Cannabis Before Legalization: A Public Safety Perspective, which focused on the perceptions of cannabis held by Canadians prior to its legalization in 2018, and also highlighted several important findings which will be used to inform future research and policies pertaining to cannabis. Furthermore, in 2019-20, a project analyzing public sentiment on social media towards cannabis legalization was completed, and is being prepared for publication. Public Safety Canada also collaborated with Statistics Canada on Cycles Five and Six of the National Cannabis Survey.

To support Indigenous participation in the regulated cannabis market, Public Safety Canada continued to take part in trilateral discussions with Indigenous communities led by Health Canada through the reporting year.

To help keep Canadian roads safe from drug-impaired drivers, Public Safety Canada continued to work with the Drug-Impaired Driving FPT Working Group, which seeks to identify methods of addressing gaps in data relating to drug-impaired driving statistics. After reaching agreement on indicators for the annual jurisdiction-based reports for 2018 and 2019, provinces and territories (PTs) submitted their reports at the end of March 2020. Public Safety Canada is currently consolidating the data and information from these PT reports into a national report on drug-impaired driving activities, trends and patterns.

Public Safety Canada continues to pursue a research study to advance knowledge on the effects of THC on driving performance. This three-year study is examining the dose-dependent effects of smoked cannabis on driving ability among a sample of 18-35 years of age drivers. A similar study on edible cannabis is in preparation.

Working with International Partners

In October 2019, Public Safety Canada and Global Affairs Canada co-led the federal delegation to the G7 Roma-Lyon Group of Experts on Counter-Terrorism and Organized Crime. This resulted in the advancement of common G7 positions in several international fora, such as at the United Nations Commission on Narcotic Drugs.

Public Safety Canada participated in the fourth annual meeting of the North American Dialogue on Drug Policy (NADD) in December 2019, which resulted in four strategic focus areas: the precursor chemical supply chain, trafficking via mail/express consignment, prevention and treatment protocols, and illicit finance activities. Within this framework, NADD partners committed to identifying new deliverables for 2020, a process that has been delayed amidst the COVID-19 pandemic.

In January 2020, Canadian and the U.S. government officials convened in Washington, D.C., to advance efforts to combat the opioid crisis currently affecting both countries. Following these meetings, Canada and the U.S. established a steering committee for the Joint Action Plan on Opioids and finalized it’s framework; established working groups aimed at enhancing current bilateral exchanges and engagements; and examined innovative solutions to law enforcement, border security, and health challenges posed by the use of opioids.

Community Safety: Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

Public Safety Canada continued to incorporate GBA+ principles and practices in community safety and crime prevention efforts, with a view to enhancing and improving work in existing programs, projects, engagement and methodology.

For example, GBA+ was integrated into the 2019 call for Community Resilience Fund applications. Building on this experience, the Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence provided guidance to projects which were awarded funding, as well as other programs and stakeholders, to continue to build capacity to further integrate GBA+ and bias sensitivity into their projects.

Additionally, Public Safety Canada applied GBA+ principles to Funding for First Nations Policing (FNPP), and Funding for First Nation and Inuit Policing Facilities (FFNIPF) programs.

Community Safety: Experimentation

No experiments were conducted under the Community Safety core responsibility, as Public Safety Canada was still in the process of implementing a new approach and raising awareness about experimentation in the 2019-20 reporting year.

Community Safety: Results achieved
Departmental results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual resultsFootnote 11 2018–19 Actual resultsFootnote 12 2019–20 Actual results
Community safety practices are strengthened. Percentage of stakeholders who reported consulting Public Safety Canada research or policy documents to inform their decision-making 70% February 28, 2020 N/A 64% 67%Footnote 13
Percentage of stakeholders reporting good or very good results of projects funded through Public Safety Canada’s Community Resilience Fund, in line with project objectives >60% March 31, 2020 N/A N/A N/AFootnote 14
Canadian communities are safe. Crime Severity Index 70.1 March 31, 2020 73.60 75.63 79.45Footnote 15
Percentage of Canadians who think that crime in their neighborhood has decreased 4% March 31, 2020 N/A N/A N/AFootnote 16
Crime is prevented and addressed in populations/ communities most at-risk. Percentage of programs where participants experienced positive changes in risk and protective factors related to offending 75% March 31, 2020 72% 58% 83%
Percentage of targeted at-risk populations that participate in Public Safety Canada projects 75% March 31, 2020 N/A N/A 75%Footnote 17
Difference between police reported crime in First Nation communities and police reported crime in the rest of Canada ≤12,000Footnote 18 March 31, 2020 17,757 18,817Footnote 19 N/AFootnote 20
Community Safety: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019–20 Main Estimates 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) 2019–20 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
343,083,282 343,083,282 302,811,534 272,306,142 (70,777,140)

The difference of $70.8 million between the planned spending of $343.1 million and the actual spending of $272.3 million is primarily due to a transfer of $52.9 million to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police for the First Nations Community Policing Service and a lapse of $15.0 million under the Contribution Program to Combat Serious and Organized Crime (CPCSOC). The lapse under CPCSOC is due to delays in finalizing contribution agreements under the Drug Impaired Driving initiative and the initiative for Protecting Children from Sexual Exploitation Online. Additionally, $21.6 million for the Memorial Grant Program for First Responders is included in planned spending, but the actual spending of $13.5 million is presented under the Emergency Management core responsibility due to an internal realignment in 2019-20. Spending associated with this program will be represented under the Community Safety core responsibility in the 2021-2022 Departmental Plan.

Community Safety: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
299 287 (12)

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Emergency Management

Description

Public Safety Canada works to strengthen national emergency preparedness to help prevent, mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from all-hazards events. The Department provides resources and expertise to Canadian communities in support of emergency preparedness, disaster mitigation and recovery.

Results

Emergency Management Strategy

Five Objectives of the Emergency Management Strategy for Canada

  • Enhance whole-of-society collaboration and governance to strengthen resilience;
  • Improve understanding of disaster risks in all sectors of society;
  • Increase focus on whole-of-society disaster prevention and mitigation activities;
  • Enhance disaster response capacity and coordination and foster the development of new capabilities; and
  • Strengthen recovery efforts by building back better to minimize the impacts of future disasters.

In 2019-20, Public Safety Canada worked with partners to advance the five objectives set out in the Emergency Management Strategy for Canada, released in January 2019. This included the collaborative development of the Emergency Management Action Plan (EMAP), as well as the planning or implementation of Budget 2019 funded initiatives such as:

In 2019-20, Public Safety Canada undertook several efforts in support of the development of the EMAP. This included co-chairing an FPT Working Group; adopting the use of Capability-Based Planning to inform the Plan’s structure; and finalizing a list of core capabilities, which have contributed to a more robust, coordinated emergency management system in Canada. Public Safety Canada also compiled the largest emergency management inventory in Canada, which consists of over 600 programs, policies, and plans from seven provinces and territories and 20 federal departments.

Public Safety Canada, in collaboration with other government departments, has advanced the National Risk Profile. To this end, the Department hosted a number of workshops to assist in refining risk and capability assessment methodologies; improving scenario development; outlining the way forward on assessment workshops with external partners; and developing a federal strategy on risk assessments. Virtual Risk and Capability assessment sessions will begin in 2020-21.

The Critical Infrastructure Resilience Programs initiative, which encompasses the Regional Resilience Assessment Program (RRAP) and the Virtual Risk Analysis Cell (VRAC), also supported the Emergency Management Strategy in 2019-20. The RRAP conducted a number of assessments across critical infrastructure sectors and provided owners and operators with several options for consideration regarding their security and resilience. The VRAC also undertook a number of research and analytical activities focused on critical infrastructure resilience.

Public Safety Canada also launched the first call for applications for the Emergency Management Public Awareness Contribution Program. Projects funded by this program aim to increase the awareness of vulnerable populations to the risks posed by natural disasters, and inform them of strategies to mitigate these risks. In this reporting period, seventeen project applications were received for review and decision.

Indigenous Emergency Management Inventory

In May 2017, as part of ongoing collaboration with Indigenous communities, FPT Ministers agreed to work together with Indigenous representatives to develop an inventory of emergency management capabilities in Indigenous communities across Canada. The Indigenous Emergency Management Capabilities Inventory is led by Public Safety Canada and the Assembly of First Nations. Public Safety Canada works closely with Indigenous representatives and communities, other federal departments, provinces/territories, and other emergency management partners to ensure the inventory is culturally sensitive, appropriate, and beneficial to communities. The project was piloted with targeted Indigenous communities in the fall of 2018, and the national roll-out across all Indigenous communities in Canada began in January 2019. In addition to the quantitative and qualitative data collected, the project strengthened bilateral and multilateral relationships between regional partners, and garnered momentum towards meaningful discussions on national emergency management issues.

As of March 2020, 104 communities had participated in the Inventory project, and additional participation is anticipated.

Proactive Approach to Flood Risks

In 2019-20, Public Safety Canada provided leadership to advance key ministerial mandate letter commitments related to flood risks. This included work on the creation of a new low-cost national flood insurance program to protect homeowners who are at high risk of flooding, and who are without adequate insurance protection. Efforts also included the preliminary planning and development of a national action plan to assist homeowners with potential relocation for those at the highest risk of repeat flooding, and support to Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) in their work with provinces, territories and Indigenous peoples to complete a comprehensive set of flood maps in Canada.

The above noted efforts are ongoing, and collaboration between Public Safety Canada and NRCan resulted in the May 2019 publication of the Federal Hydrologic and Hydraulic Procedures for Floodplain Delineation report in support of flood mitigation efforts. This document is part of the Federal Floodplain Mapping Guidelines Series and is intended as a resource for practitioners who are conducting hydrologic and hydraulic investigations prior to the development of floodplain maps.

Similarly, the Federal Geomatics Guidelines for Floodplain Mapping were published in September 2019. These guidelines aim to provide a broad overview of various types of floodplain maps, including their contents and uses, with the aim of establishing consistency in Canadian floodplain mapping efforts.

Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund

Public Safety Canada continued to cooperate with Infrastructure Canada in the delivery of the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund (DMAF), a 10-year national program that will invest $2 billion in projects that will help communities better withstand natural hazards.

As of March 31, 2020, 59 DMAF projects have been approved, and over $1.7 billion in funding allocated. This investment contributes to Public Safety Canada's priority of strengthening community resilience to emergencies in collaboration with provinces and territories, Indigenous communities and municipalities.

National Public Alerting System

To enhance disaster response capacity and coordination, Department officials continued work with FPT partners, broadcasters, wireless companies and industry to deliver guidance and direction on the operation and expansion of the all-hazards National Public Alerting System.

In July 2019, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) approved an application by FPT Senior Officials Responsible for Emergency Management to increase testing of the alerting system from once to twice per year, and to harmonize television and radio tests. Two national tests of the system were successfully carried out by FPTs during the annual Emergency Preparedness week in May 2019, and again in November 2019.

The Department continued to work with FPT partners and the private sector to maintain and support national alerting standards, such as the Canadian Profile of the Common Alerting Protocol and the Common Look and Feel Guidance with a view to ensuring the system is effective, accessible, inclusive, and fully capable of carrying alerts in both of Canada’s official languages.

Public Safety Broadband Network

In June 2019, the Temporary National Coordination Office published their Progress Report on a National Public Safety Broadband Network - Working towards the next generation of public safety communications in Canada. This report was completed following extensive research, stakeholder engagement and literature reviews, and provides both a summary of the work accomplished and recommendations moving forward. These recommendations relate to governance, guiding principles, service delivery, approaches to achieving robust coverage and capacity, and the next steps in advancing the proposed Public Safety Broadband Network.

National Search and Rescue Secretariat

In 2019-20, Public Safety Canada continued to enhance search and rescue (SAR) efforts in Canada by strengthening the governance of the national SAR community and advancing program initiatives through development of strategic policy framework in collaboration and consultation with provinces and territories, and partners such as the Department of National Defence, Parks Canada, the Canadian Coast Guard, Transport Canada and the Search and Rescue Volunteer Association of Canada.

Targeted engagement and communication efforts have also further improved the Secretariat’s capacity to connect with key stakeholders, and consolidate efforts in the field of SAR in order to enhance the safety of Canadians.

The Department also continued to work collaboratively with the Urban Search and Rescue Advisory Committee on key objectives for the Heavy Urban Search and Rescue (HUSAR) program, which resulted in the drafting of a national concept of operations, as well as the development of preliminary plans for a national team accreditation process. As present, six HUSAR Task Forces have a funding agreement in place to strengthen their capacity and interoperability for effective and timely response to emergency events.

A call for proposals under the Search and Rescue New Initiatives Fund was open between June and September 2019, and yielded seven new projects designed to enhance prevention and response to incidents.

Post-Traumatic Stress Injuries and Public Safety Personnel

In April 2019, the Government of Canada announced the release of Supporting Canada’s Public Safety Personnel: An Action Plan on Post-Traumatic Stress Injuries. The Action Plan supports research, prevention, early intervention, stigma-reduction, and the provision of healthcare and treatment for all types of public safety personnel in Canada. As part of commitments made under the Action Plan, an Internet-delivered Cognitive Behavioural Therapy pilot was launched in Saskatchewan in January 2020, and 22 one-year research catalyst grant recipients were provided with $2.95 million in funding in fiscal year 2019-20.

Government Operations Centre

The Government Operations Centre (GOC) continued to provide an all-hazards, integrated federal emergency response to a wide range of events of national interest, including potential or actual, natural or human-induced, and accidental or intentional incidents. The GOC’s efforts included 24/7 monitoring and reporting, national-level situational awareness, the production of warning products and integrated risk assessments, as well as national-level planning and whole-of-government response management efforts.

In 2019-20, Public Safety Canada led the strategic coordination of the federal response to several major events, including (but not limited to): floods across Canada, particularly in Ontario, Québec, and New Brunswick; the wildfires in northwestern Ontario and Alberta; Hurricane Dorian in Nova Scotia; the major snowstorm in Newfoundland and Labrador; and the domestic reception of Canadians from Wuhan, China, at the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak (in support of the Public Health Agency Canada and Global Affairs Canada).

In support of whole-of-government responses to emergencies, the GOC maintained an interconnectivity portal to support emergency communications amongst 28 federal organizations, through which 2,750 incident responses were coordinated and managed in 2019-2020.

Public Safety Canada continued to work in collaboration with Public Services and Procurement Canada and Shared Services Canada in the modernization and construction of updated GOC facilities. The design phase of GOC was at 66% of completion as of March 2020, and the implementation phase of the project is expected to begin in 2020-21.

The Department continued to advance federal preparedness for incidents affecting the national interest by delivering scenarios that simulate emergency events, thereby fully addressing the priorities of the National Exercise Program for the reporting year. This included leading and supporting other federal organizations in the design, development, delivery and evaluation of whole-of-government exercises, such as: the COVID-19 pandemic; major catastrophic or extreme weather events; and the Canadian federal election.

In 2019-20, serving as secretariat of the Federal Exercise Working Group, the Department worked with partners to begin the development of an integrated, all-hazards approach to emergency preparedness. After-action reports were subsequently completed, and included recommendations relating to potential areas of improvement and the compilation of best practices in an effort to continually improve responses to future events.

The Continuous Improvement Program conducted after-action activities in relation to cyclical events (floods, fires, hurricane); winter storms (Manitoba, Newfoundland and Labrador); and the initial stages of the COVID-19 outbreak.

Emergency Management: Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

Public Safety Canada continued to incorporate GBA+ considerations into Emergency Preparedness programs and operations, as well as Emergency Prevention and Mitigation strategies and policies.

For example, GBA+ analysis was applied in developing the Emergency Management Public Awareness Contribution Program. Projects under this program aim to increase the awareness of vulnerable populations, such as low-income Canadians, seniors, women, new immigrants, and Indigenous communities, to the risks posed by natural disasters, and provide strategies to mitigate them. Approximately 17 project applications were received for review and decision. Preliminary results from this work will be available in 2020-2021.

Additionally, GBA+ analysis was integrated into the implementation of the Emergency Management Strategy for Canada: Toward a Resilient 2030 including the advancement of the National Risk Profile initiative, which will consider how risks, and any associated capability gaps that may have inconsistent impacts on different individuals and communities, including vulnerable populations. Similarly, flood insurance policy work during the year applied GBA+ analysis to ensure that the flood risk reduction and mitigation considered vulnerable populations.

Emergency Management: Experimentation

No experiments were conducted under the Emergency Management Core Responsibility, as Public Safety Canada was still in the process of implementing a new approach and raising awareness about experimentation in the 2019-20 reporting year.

Emergency Management: Results achieved
Departmental results Departmental Results indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual resultsFootnote 21 2018–19 Actual resultsFootnote 22 2019–20 Actual results
Canada can effectively mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from all-hazards events Percentage of priorities for the National Exercise Program (emergency scenario simulations) that are addressed over a two-year period 80% March 31, 2020 82% 100% 100%
Percentage of disaster events leading to requests for federal disaster assistance 25% March 31, 2020 N/A N/A N/AFootnote 23
Disaster Resilience Index N/AFootnote 24 March 31, 2020 N/A N/A N/A
Percentage of stakeholders indicating that the Government Operations Centre (GOC) provided effective leadership and coordination for events affecting the national interest 80% March 31, 2020 86% 87% 92%
Percentage of stakeholders who found that the information, guidance, and decision support provided by the Government Operations Centre (GOC) increased the effectiveness of their response and recovery efforts 80% March 31, 2020 87% 90% 91%
Emergency Management: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019–20 Main Estimates 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) 2019–20 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
327,321,389 327,321,389 568,382,169 555,007,610 227,686,221

The difference of $227.7 million between the planned spending of $327.3 million and the actual spending of $555.0 million is primarily due to new funding received for the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements from Budget 2019 – Ensuring Better Disaster Management Preparation and Response initiative ($155.0 million) and for a statutory grant in support of Shock Trauma Air Rescue Service ($65.0 million). Additionally, actual spending of $13.5 million for the Memorial Grant Program for First Responders is included under the Emergency Management core responsibility as a result of an internal realignment in 2019-20. As this program is intended to be presented under the Community Safety core responsibility, it will be adjusted and realigned in the 2021-22 Departmental Plan.

Emergency Management: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
237 264 27

The variance of 27 FTEs between the planned FTEs of 237 and the actual FTEs of 264 is due mostly to the continuation of hiring employees in support of the Government Operations Centre Modernization Project, the Government Operations Centre and the implementation of the Emergency Management Strategy.

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Internal Services

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are:

Results

Values and Ethics Strategic Framework and Action Plan

Under its Values, Inclusion and Wellness (VIEW) Action Plan, Public Safety Canada undertook a broad range of activities and initiatives in support of values and ethics, diversity and inclusion, and workplace wellness and mental health.

Values and Ethics

In 2019-20, the Department developed content for the Leadership 20/20 training, and provided materials on values and ethics, conflict of interest, harassment, and political activities in the workplace. Six “Respect in the Workplace” sessions were also delivered to numerous teams across the Department.

Public Safety Canada developed a conflict of interest case-treatment process. Additionally, 31 conflict of interest assessments were completed in 2019-20, along with the development of additional awareness-raising and educational products, including ethics-related scenarios and training.

Increased Diversity and Inclusion

In 2019-20, Public Safety Canada undertook efforts to foster and encourage a healthy, safe and harassment-free workplace for all employees, including those in LGBTQ2+ communities.

Additionally, designated leads and champions for the Department’s Positive Space Initiative (PSI):

Built on the themes of innovation, diversity and inclusion, Public Safety Canada held a Department-wide Town Hall in September 2019. The Town Hall incorporated numerous topics pertaining to Indigenous groups and peoples, and it provided opportunities through kiosk displays for: networking; participation in working groups; regional operations; and wellness and diversity groups within the Department. A post-event evaluation was positive, and indicated that employees felt engaged both leading up to and following the event.

An internal Inclusive by Design Committee established three subgroups to study specific areas related to diversity and inclusion, including “AccessAbility”; “2019 Public Service Employee Survey Priorities”; and “Recruitment, Retention and Talent Management of Under-represented Groups”.

The Department also hosted a diversity speaker series in January 2020, which included an information session on the Accessibility Strategy for the Public Service of Canada; a panel discussion on Many Voices One Mind; and a chat with Canada’s Ambassador for Women, Peace and Security.

To support governance mechanisms in the Department, full representation was re-established at the Employment Equity Champions and Chairs Committees. Additionally, Public Safety Canada continued to recruit and train Positive Space Champions, with approximately 45 employees having completed training as of March 2020.

Healthy Workplaces and Mental Health

In 2019-20, Public Safety Canada continued work towards promoting workplace wellness by:

Directorates across the Department reported increased participation in wellness and workplace improvement activities.

Public Safety Canada celebrated Healthy Workplaces Month in October 2019, and focused on four key themes: psychological, spiritual, social, and economic wellness. The Excellence Canada Benchmark Assessment was shared with management and employees, along with a series of tools for managers to use in health-related discussions with their staff.

As realities of the COVID-19 pandemic set in, the Department enhanced its focus on workplace wellness by balancing flexible work arrangements, such as telework, with operational requirements. The Department also contributed to the development of new or improved remote work tools, provided psychological supports to employees, and adopted a policy to better respond to changing workloads by reassigning staff to different divisions, branches or departments on an ad hoc basis, where needed.

Establishment of Ombudsman Office

In 2019-20, Public Safety Canada continued to advance efforts on the creation of a new Office of the Ombudsman for the Department. A Departmental working group and a dedicated project team led implementation efforts, which resulted in the creation of an office that will provide employees with a neutral space that offers informal, confidential and impartial support for workplace-related issues. The Office of the Ombudsman is now fully operational and an Ombudsman has been appointed.

Enhanced People Management and Training

In 2019-20, the Department bolstered human resources (HR) knowledge and technical competencies of people management policies and practices through the provision of training and recruitment aids, such as the hiring of Canadian Armed Forces members and veterans, and the launch of new, mandatory training programs for HR advisors and strategic practitioners.

Talent Management and Staffing Solutions

Several new initiatives were implemented at Public Safety Canada to improve staffing and recruitment, such as:

In 2019-20, the Public Safety Executive Network developed and delivered the 2020 Public Safety Executive Symposium, along with several other leadership sessions for the executive community.

Human Resources Improvements

In 2019-20, Public Safety Canada’s Human Resources Directorate created a number of tools and refined several processes in order to enhance performance management and reporting, such as:

Respect in the Workplace

Departmental staff were encouraged and given the opportunity to participate and complete courses from the Canada School of Public Service on a variety of subjects including: Building the Workforce; Respectful and Inclusive Workplaces; Personal and Team Development; Leadership; Career Development; and Communication Skills.

Additionally, Public Safety Canada is currently piloting an “Honest Broker” approach that aims to facilitate the management of social relationships in the workplace and enhance communication between managers and employees. The intent of this approach is to continue building a collaborative, inclusive and respectful workplace and further advance health and wellness commitments.

Performance Management and Reporting

During the reporting year, Public Safety Canada increased the effectiveness and strength of its performance measurement and reporting exercises by enhancing performance measurement practices and streamlining its internal processes.

The Department focused on both increasing awareness of performance measurement throughout the Department, and on delivering high-quality products and services in compliance with the Policy on Results. To this end, several initiatives were implemented, including a full-scale review of the Departmental Results Framework; the launch of a review of Public Safety Canada’s Performance Information Profiles; workshops on performance tools and approaches; and the provision of advice and guidance to Programs in relation to performance measurement.

Public Safety Canada developed new performance metrics for its corporate services and increased the use of performance measurement in policy development and implementation. The corporate planning process was also enhanced via a new Integrated Risk Management Framework and Corporate Risk Profile.

For the 2019-20 Management Accountability Framework Assessment, Public Safety Canada achieved strong overall results, thereby demonstrating continued progress towards a departmental culture of excellence in public sector management.

Program Performance Measurement

The Annual Performance Report (APR) for the Guns and Gang Violence Action Fund was completed and implemented. The Crime Prevention Action Fund and First Nation Policing Program APRs are under development and are anticipated to be published in 2020-21.

The Public Safety Data Strategy

Building on the federal whole-of-government strategy published in 2018, the Department developed and began implementation of the Public Safety Data Strategy in the fall 2019.

The Data Strategy aims to strengthen data capacity, collection, use, sharing and governance within the Department. Public Safety Canada has completed an assessment of the Department’s current data environment, including data literacy and notable data gaps, which was informed by Departmental consultations. The Department has also established an IM/IT Plan to confirm governance and leadership roles and responsibilities; solidify open data processes; and enhance the current data inventory process.

The Department’s Data Strategy is considered “evergreen” and will continue to evolve, and the next phase of the implementation process is expected to begin in 2021-22.

Internal Services: Gender-based analysis plus (GBA+)

In June 2019, Public Safety Canada developed and disseminated new GBA+ tools in order to support employees in applying gender and diversity considerations to the development and implementation of policies, programs and operations.

The Department also completed an internal “Laser Audit” on its application of GBA+ in spring 2019, which confirmed that Public Safety Canada has all the key GBA+ elements in place that align with the suggested approach for the Government of Canada. Some enhancements to performance measurement and reporting on GBA+ were recommended, and implementation of these recommendations is in progress.

Internal Services: Experimentation

During the reporting period, the Department developed and began the implementation of an experimentation strategy. The first step of this process involved enhancing staff awareness of experimentation through a speakers series, which was launched in 2020. A process to encourage greater experimentation is expected to begin in 2020-21.

Internal Services: Budgetary financial resources (dollars)
2019–20 Main Estimates 2019–20 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used) 2019–20 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)
54,002,387 54,002,387 71,610,378 69,882,286 15,879,899

The difference of $15.9 million between the planned spending of $54.0 million and the actual spending of $69.9 million is primarily due to funding received of $7.6 million from the TB Central Vote for compensation adjustments and eligible pay list expenditures; $5.0 million related to funding for new initiatives and primarily for Protecting Children from Sexual Exploitation Online, Protecting Canada’s National Security, Passenger Protect Program, and Strengthening Canada's Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Terrorist Financing Regime; and $1.9 million in expenditures related to strategic investments in leasehold improvements and information technology.

Internal Services: Human resources (full-time equivalents)
2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 Difference
(Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)
438 473 35

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada’s Program Inventory is available in the GC InfoBase.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

The following graph presents planned (voted and statutory spending) over time.

Spending (voted and statutory) over time (thousands of dollars)

Snapshot: 2018-19 Actual Expenditures

Image description

Departmental Spending Trend Graph by fiscal year and by thousands of dollars

  • For Fiscal Year 2017–18, the total was 959,072, the voted number was 944,442 and the statutory number was 14,630.
  • For Fiscal Year 2018–19, the total was 727,600, the voted number was 712,758 and the statutory number was 14,842.
  • For Fiscal Year 2019–20, the total was 919,335, the voted number was 838,625 and the statutory number was 80,710.
  • For Fiscal Year 2020–21, the planned total is 725,523, the planned voted number is 709,670 and the planned statutory number is 15,853.
  • For Fiscal Year 2021–22, the planned total is 979,475, the planned voted number is 963,690 and the planned statutory number is 15,785.
  • For Fiscal Year 2022–23, the planned total is 633,899, the planned voted number is 618,381 and the planned statutory number is 15,518.
Spending (voted and statutory) over time (thousands of dollars)
  2017–18 2018–19 2019–20 2020–21 2021–22 2022–23
Statutory 14,630 14,842 80,710 15,853 15,785 15,518
Voted 944,442 712,758 838,625 709,670 963,690 618,381
Total 959,072 727,600 919,335 725,523 979,475 633,899
Budgetary performance summary for Core Responsibilities and Internal Services (dollars)
Core Responsibilities and Internal Services 2019–20 Main Estimates 2019–20 Planned spending 2020–21 Planned spending 2021–22 Planned spending 2019–20 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2018–19 Actual spending (authorities used) 2019–20 Actual spending (authorities used)
National Security 18,590,543 18,590,543 23,277,468 23,545,268 26,101,072 26,584,284 24,915,803 22,139,061
Community Safety 343,083,282 343,083,282 366,193,256 380,212,804 302,811,534 193,908,028 297,109,222 272,306,142
Emergency Management 327,321,389 327,321,389 273,595,588 514,621,089 568,382,169 680,843,474 338,295,648 555,007,610
Budget Implementation vote – unallocated authorities Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable 5,705,505 Not applicable Not applicable Not applicable
Subtotal 688,995,214 688,995,214 663,066,312 918,379,161 903,000,280 901,335,786 660,320,673 849,452,813
Internal Services 54,002,387 54,002,387 62,456,660 61,095,944 71,610,378 57,735,831 67,279,767 69,882,286
Total 742,997,601 742,997,601 725,522,972 979,475,105 974,610,658 959,071,617 727,600,440 919,335,099
2019-20 Planned v. Actual: Financial Resources

2019-20 Planned v.  Actual: Financial Resources

Image description

2019-20 Planned versus Actuals for Financial Services by Core Responsibility and Internal Services:

  • National Security (Actual: $22.1M,planned: $18.6M) Variance of 19%
  • Community Safety (Actual: $272.3M, planned: $343.0M) Variance of 21%
  • Emergency Management (Actual: $555.0M, planned: $327.3M) Variance of 70%
  • Internal Services (Actual: $69.9M, planned: $54.0M) Variance of 29%
  • Public Safety Canada (Actual: $919.3M, planned: $743.0M) Variance of 24%

Actual spending for 2019-20 is $191.7 million (26%) higher than expenditures in 2018-19. The increase is mainly due to:

Offset by:

In 2019–20, the Main Estimates and Planned Spending increased by $231.6 million (31%) to a Total Authorities Available for Use of $974.6 million. The increase is mainly attributed to:

Offset by:

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for core responsibilities and Internal Services
Core responsibilities and Internal Services 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Actual full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Actual full-time equivalents 2020–21 Planned full-time equivalents 2021–22 Planned full-time equivalents
National Security 206 223 162 181 184 184
Community Safety 264 271 299 287 290 281
Emergency Management 245 252 237 264 233 233
Subtotal 715 746 698 732 707 698
Internal Services 404 434 438 473 430 427
Total 1,119 1,180 1,136 1,205 1,137 1,125

The increase of 61 full-time equivalent (FTEs) (5%) from 1,119 FTEs in 2017-18 to 1,180 FTEs in 2018-19 Actual is mainly due to the commencement of new initiatives in 2018-19 such as funding to take action against gun and gang violence, the Critical Infrastructure Security program, the enhanced Passenger Protect Program and funding for infrastructure projects in Indigenous communities.

The increase of 25 FTEs (2%) from 1,180 FTEs in 2018-19 to 1,205 FTEs in 2019-20 is mainly due to the implementation of new initiatives in 2019-20 such as the National Cyber Security Strategy and the Emergency Management Strategy and primarily offset by the transfer of the Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre to the Communications Security Establishment.

The increase of 69 FTEs from the 2019-20 Planned FTEs to the 2019-20 Actual FTEs is mainly due to hiring in support of the Passenger Protect Program, Investment Canada Act, the Government Operations Centre Modernization Project, and the Government Operations Centre as well as the implementation of new initiatives in 2019-20, such as the National Cyber Security Strategy and the Emergency Management Strategy.

2019-20 Planned v. Actual: Human Resources

2019-20 Planned v. Actual: Human Resources

Image description

2019-20 Planned versus Actuals for Human Resources by Core Responsibility and Internal Services

  • National Security (Actual: 181 FTEs, planned: 162 FTEs) Variance of 12%
  • Community Safety (Actual: 287 FTEs, planned: 299 FTEs) Variance of 4%
  • Emergency Management (Actual: 264 FTEs, planned: 237 FTEs) Variance of 11%
  • Internal Services (Actual: 473 FTEs, planned: 438 FTEs) Variance of 8%
  • Public Safety Canada (Actual: 1,205 FTEs, planned: 1,136 FTEs) Variance of 6%

Expenditures by vote

For information on the Public Safety Canada’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2019–2020.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of the Public Safety Canada’s spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in GC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

Public Safety Canada’s financial statements (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2020, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statement highlights
Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2020 (dollars)
Financial information 2019–20 Planned results 2019–20 Actual results 2018–19 Actual results Difference (2019–20 Actual results minus 2019–20 Planned results) Difference (2019–20 Actual results minus 2018–19 Actual results)
Total expenses 829,754,833 1,052,982,268 1,294,697,618 223,227,435 (241,715,350)
Total revenues (2,700,000) (2,376,546) (2,153,776) 323,454 (222,770)
Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers 827,054,833 1,050,605,722 1,292,543,842 223,550,889 (241,938,120)

Total departmental expenses have decreased by $241.7 million from $1,295 million in 2018-19 to $1,053 million in 2019-20. This decrease can be attributed primarily to a decrease in transfer payments to provinces and to non-profit organizations.

The chart below presents the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position by showing expenses by category as a percentage of total departmental accrual accounting expenses. Transfer payments represent 81.5% of the total expenses of $1,053 million. Meanwhile, salaries and employee benefits represent 12%, professional and special services 1.6%, accommodation 1.3% and other expenses which include travel and relocation, equipment, communication, equipment rentals, amortization, repairs, utilities, material and supplies represent 1.7%.

2019-20 Expenses by Category

2019-20 Expenses by Category

Image description

This chart presents the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position by showing expenses by category as a percentage of total departmental accrual accounting expenses. Transfer payments represent 81.5% of expenses which amounts to $858 million; salaries and employee benefits account for 12.9% which is $136 million; professional and special services is 2.2% with $23 million; accommodation is 1.5% at $16 million; and other expenses, which include travel and relocation, equipment, communication, equipment rentals, amortization, repairs, bad debt expense, utilities, material and supplies, account for 1.9% or $20 million of total expenses.

Condensed Statement of Financial Position (unaudited) as of March 31, 2020 (dollars)
Financial information 2019–20 2018–19 Difference (2019–20 minus 2018–19)
Total net liabilities (3,298,371,971) (3,113,935,553) (184,436,418)
Total net financial assets 643,032,770 581,394,732 61,638,038
Departmental net debt (2,655,339,201) (2,532,540,821) (122,798,380)
Total non-financial assets 8,191,809 9,594,668 (1,402,859)
Departmental net financial position (2,647,147,392) (2,522,946,153) (124,201,239)

Public Safety Canada's total net liabilities of $3,298 million is primarily comprised of Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangement (DFAA) ($2,646 million) program liabilities, accounts payables and accrued liabilities ($639 million), vacation pay and compensatory leave ($8 million) and employee future benefits ($5 million).

The increase of $184 million in total net liabilities is mainly attributed to an increase in the DFAA accrued liabilities.

The total net financial assets of $643 million include $633 million due from the consolidated revenue fund and accounts receivables and advances of $9 million. The increase in the total net financial assets is mainly due to the increase in the due from the consolidated revenue fund.

Total net liabilities were approximately $3,298 million at the end of 2019-20, an increase of 5% when compared to the previous year.

The chart below shows total net liabilities by type of liability.

2019-20 Total Net Liabilities

2019-20 Total Net Liabilities

Image description

This chart shows total net liabilities by type of liability. Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA) make up 80.2% of total net liabilities at $2,646 million; accounts payable and accrued liabilities make up 19.4% at $639 million; and vacation pay, compensatory leave and employee future benefits make up 0.4% with $14 million.

Additional information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister[s]:

The Honourable William Sterling Blair, P.C., C.O.M., M.P.

(Former) The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.

Institutional head:

Mr. Rob Stewart

(Former) Ms. Gina Wilson

Ministerial portfolio:
Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness
Enabling instrument[s]:
Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Act (2005), Emergency Management Act (2007).
Year of incorporation/commencement:
2003

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

“Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do” is available on Public Safety Canada’s website.

For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter.

Reporting framework

Public Safety Canada’s Departmental Results Framework and Program Inventory of record for 2019–20 are shown below.

2019-20 Reporting Framework by Core Responsibility

Results Framework
National Security Community Safety Emergency Management

RESULT: National Security threats are understood and reduced

1. Canada’s ranking on the Global Terrorism Index

2. Canada’s ranking in the Cybersecurity Index

3. Percentage of the population who think that the right mechanisms are in place to prevent and respond to terrorism acts in Canada

4. Percentage of partners indicating that Public Safety Canada provided effective policy leadership and operational coordination on national security issues

5. Critical Infrastructure Resilience Score

RESULT: Community safety practices are strengthened

1. Percentage of stakeholders who reported consulting Public Safety research or policy documents to inform their decision making

2. Percentage of stakeholders reporting good or very good results of projects funded through Public Safety’s Community Resilience Fund, in line with project objectives

RESULT: Canadian communities are safe

3. Crime Severity Index

4. Percentage of Canadians who think that crime in their neighbourhood has decreased

RESULT: Crime is prevented and addressed in populations/communities most at-risk

5. Percentage of programs where participants experienced positive changes in risk and protective factors related to offending

6. Percentage of targeted at-risk populations that participate in public safety projects

7. Difference between police reported crime in First Nation communities and police reported crime in the rest of Canada

RESULT: Canada can effectively mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from all-hazards events

1. Percentage of priorities for the National Exercise Program (emergency scenario simulations) that are addressed over a two-year period

2. Percentage of disaster events leading to requests for federal disaster assistance

3. Disaster Resilience Index

4. Percentage of stakeholders indicating that the GOC provided effective leadership and coordination for events affecting the national interest

5. Percentage of stakeholders who found that the information, guidance, and decision support provided by the GOC increased the effectiveness of their response efforts

Program Inventory
National Security Community Safety Emergency Management

National Security Leadership

Critical Infrastructure

Cyber Security

Crime Prevention

Law Enforcement and Policing

Serious and Organized Crime

Border Policy

Indigenous Policing

Corrections

Emergency Prevention/Mitigation

Emergency Preparedness

Emergency Response/Recovery

Supporting information on the program inventory

Financial, human resources and performance information for Public Safety Canada’s Program Inventory is available in GC InfoBase.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables will soon be available on Public Safety Canada’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

General enquiries:
613-944-4875 or 1-800-830-3118
E-mail:
ps.enquires-questions.sp@canada.ca
Media enquiries:
613-991-0657 or ps.mediarelations-relationsaveclesmedias.sp@canada.ca
National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC):
1-800-830-3118 or ps.prevention-prevention.sp@canada.ca
National Office for Victims:
1-866-525-0554
Passenger Protect Inquiries Office:
ps.ppinquiries-demandespp.sp@canada.ca
Teletypewriter (TTY):
1-866-865-5667
Fax:
613-954-5186
Post:
269 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
K1A 0P8

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
core responsibility (responsabilité essentielle)
An enduring function or role performed by a department. The intentions of the department with respect to a core responsibility are reflected in one or more related departmental results that the department seeks to contribute to or influence.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a 3‑year period. Departmental Plans are usually tabled in Parliament each spring.
departmental priority (priorité)
A plan or project that a department has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired departmental results.
departmental result (résultat ministériel)
A consequence or outcome that a department seeks to achieve. A departmental result is often outside departments’ immediate control, but it should be influenced by program-level outcomes.
departmental result indicator (indicateur de résultat ministériel)
A quantitative measure of progress on a departmental result.
departmental results framework (cadre ministériel des résultats)
A framework that connects the department’s core responsibilities to its departmental results and departmental result indicators.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on a department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
experimentation (expérimentation)
The conducting of activities that seek to first explore, then test and compare the effects and impacts of policies and interventions in order to inform evidence-based decision-making, and improve outcomes for Canadians, by learning what works, for whom and in what circumstances. Experimentation is related to, but distinct from innovation (the trying of new things), because it involves a rigorous comparison of results. For example, using a new website to communicate with Canadians can be an innovation; systematically testing the new website against existing outreach tools or an old website to see which one leads to more engagement, is experimentation.
full-time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. For a particular position, the full‑time equivalent figure is the ratio of number of hours the person actually works divided by the standard number of hours set out in the person’s collective agreement.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical process used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people experience policies, programs and services based on multiple factors including race ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2019–20 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2019 Speech from the Throne, namely: Fighting climate change; Strengthening the Middle Class; Walking the road of reconciliation; Keeping Canadians safe and healthy; and Positioning Canada for success in an uncertain world.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more federal organizations are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
non-budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally, a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)

For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts presented in Main Estimates.

A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.

program (programme)
Individual or groups of services, activities or combinations thereof that are managed together within the department and focus on a specific set of outputs, outcomes or service levels.
program inventory (répertoire des programmes)
Identifies all the department’s programs and describes how resources are organized to contribute to the department’s core responsibilities and results.
result (résultat)
A consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an appropriation act. The vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.
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