Departmental Results Report 2017-18

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Minister’s Message

The Honourable Ralph Goodale

As Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness, I am pleased to present Public Safety Canada's 2017-18 Departmental Results Report.

Canada is a fundamentally safe and peaceful nation, but it is not immune to a wide range of evolving threats to our safety – physical or digital, natural or otherwise. This year’s Departmental Results Report demonstrates Public Safety Canada’s key role in helping to protect Canadians from these threats in a changing world.

In that complex threat environment, Public Safety Canada is playing a leadership role in keeping pace. Bill C-59, introduced in 2017 after robust public consultations, proposes broad, innovative and modernized updates of our security and intelligence laws, our accountability and transparency approach to national security, and to the work of our world-class security agencies, while protecting the rights of Canadians. In 2017-18, following extensive consultations, Public Safety Canada also led the design and release of a new National Cyber Security Strategy, empowering the Government to meet its goals even as technology and cyber threats evolve. It aims to ensure secure and resilient cyber systems and an innovative and adaptive cyber ecosystem, and will support effective leadership and collaboration with all partners.

In the physical environment, weather-related emergencies and natural disasters are becoming more frequent and severe. The 2018 wildfire season in British Columbia was a telling example, causing considerable damage and prompting a quick, coordinated federal response from the Government Operations Centre housed at Public Safety Canada. To help meet challenges like these across the country, in 2017-18 the Department advanced work on the Emergency Management Strategy for Canada with provincial and territorial partners and in collaboration with Indigenous representatives and other key stakeholders. It will chart a course towards a more resilient future, adopting a whole-of-society approach to emergency management and disaster risk reduction.

Keeping our communities safe also means helping to prevent violence and crime, and supporting effective policing and corrections, with a focus on vulnerable populations. With communities across the country facing an increase in gun violence, Public Safety Canada played a key role in ensuring all levels of government, experts and stakeholders were consulted on this critical issue, and in tabling practical new firearms laws through Bill C-71, prioritizing public safety while respecting law-abiding gun owners. In June 2017, the Department officially launched the Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence, to provide national leadership on preventing radicalization to violence, and to enhance the ability to address radicalization at the local level.

The Department also announced a federal investment of up to $291 million over five years for policing in communities served by the First Nations Policing Program. In preparation for the legalization of cannabis, the Department began collaborating with all partners on law enforcement training and capacity building to enforce new drug-impaired driving laws, and introduced Don’t Drive High, a successful public awareness campaign highlighting the dangers of drug-impaired driving.

I invite all Canadians to read the 2017-18 Departmental Results Report, to see how Public Safety Canada is achieving results and meeting its commitments to help keep Canadians safe and secure.

The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P.
Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Results at a glance

Actual spending for 2017-18: $959,071,617
Actual FTEs for 2017-18: 1,119

Results at a glance
Achievements Results

National Security

Public Safety Canada completed a cyber security review and consultations in order to establish a way forward in regards to cyber security in Canada. The National Cyber Security Strategy was developed based on these consultations and the Canada Centre for Cyber Security was announced as Canada’s unified approach to cyber security.

Countering Radicalization to Violence

The Department launched the Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence to provide national leadership on Canada’s efforts to prevent radicalization to violence.

Emergency Management Framework

Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers approved an updated collaborative Canadian Emergency Management Framework, the third edition since it was first issued ten years ago.

Legalization and Regulation of Cannabis      

Significant progress was made to advance the legalization and strict regulation of cannabis. This included supporting the introduction and review of new legislation (Bills C-45 and C-46) in Parliament, securing related funding for law enforcement over five years to support provinces and territories in enforcing new laws related to drug-impaired driving and launching the Don’t Drive High public education and awareness campaign.

Supporting mental health and wellness in the workplace   

Public Safety Canada continued to implement activities to support employee mental health and workplace wellness, in accordance with its Values and Ethics Strategic Framework and Action Plan.  The Department launched two employee engagement initiatives to address the workload issues highlighted by an employee survey: a Task Force on Efficiencies, to explore and implement employees’ ideas about business process improvements; and a Task Force on Staffing, to explore and implement employees’ ideas to improve staffing processes and retention.

Effective performance measurement and sound management practices.

In 2017-18, as part of the implementation of the TBS Policy on Results, Public Safety Canada developed its new Departmental Results Framework (DRF). The adoption of this reporting structure improves reporting to Canadians by focusing on the quality and robustness of the Department’s performance measures.

For more information on Public Safety Canada’s plans, priorities and results achieved, see the “Results: what we achieved” section of this report.

Raison d’être, mandate and role: who we are and what we do

Raison d’être

Mission

Build a safe and resilient CanadaFootnote1

Vision

Through outstanding leadership, achieve a safe and secure Canada and strong and resilient communities

The Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness (PSEP) plays a key role in discharging the Government’s fundamental responsibility for the safety and security of its citizens. The Minister of PSEP is responsible for the Department. Legislation governing the Department sets out three essential roles: (i) support the Minister’s responsibility for all matters related to public safety and emergency management not assigned to another federal organization; (ii) exercise leadership at the national level for national security and emergency preparedness; and (iii) support the Minister’s responsibility for the coordination of Public Safety’s Portfolio entities.

The Department provides strategic policy advice and support to the Minister of PSEP on a range of issues including: national security, border strategies, countering crime, and emergency management. The Department also delivers a number of grant and contribution programs related to emergency management, national security and community safety.

Public Safety Portfolio

Mandate and role

Public Safety Canada was created in 2003 to ensure coordination across all federal departments and agencies responsible for national security and the safety of Canadians. Public Safety Canada maintains a presence in all provinces with offices representing the five regions (Atlantic, Québec and Nunavut, Ontario, the Prairies and Northwest Territories, and British Columbia and Yukon). The Department’s mandate is to keep Canada safe from a range of risks such as natural disasters, crime and terrorism. As such, Public Safety Canada collaborates with federal partners as well as other levels of government, non-government organizations, community groups, the private sector, foreign states, academia, communities and first responders on issues related to national and border security, crime prevention, community safety and emergency management. This cooperation supports a cohesive and integrated approach to Canada’s safety and security.

Public Safety Canada is organized into five branches: Emergency Management and Programs, Community Safety and Countering Crime, Portfolio Affairs and Communications, National and Cyber Security, Corporate Management; it also has a Chief Audit and Evaluation Executive and is supported by a Legal Services Unit. The Department has a regional presence in all provinces, as well as in the North, in order to deliver a coordinated federal response to emergencies; facilitate the effective delivery of emergency management, Indigenous policing and crime prevention programs; and improve partnerships with other levels of government and key regional stakeholders.

The commitments outlined in the Minister of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness’ mandate letter are as follows:

For more general information about the department, see the “Supplementary information” section of this report. For more information on the department’s organizational mandate letter commitments, see the Minister’s mandate letter on the Prime Minister of Canada’s website.

Operating context and key risks

Operating context

Public Safety Canada operates in a dynamic environment with an array of factors that have the potential to greatly impact the Department’s operations. In order to deliver on its broad mandate and generate results for Canadians, Public Safety Canada must remain at the forefront of developments to ensure the government’s approach to Canada’s safety and security is cohesive and coordinated.

Virtually every aspect of Canadians’ lives depends on information technology. Cyber threats have become dynamic and ever-changing and affect all types of organizations. During the reporting period, Public Safety Canada continued to help protect Canadians and ensure the resilience of Canada’s critical infrastructure. Addressing this issue requires effective leadership and cooperation with partners and stakeholders as well as measures to build an innovative and adaptive cyber environment to ensure the protection of vital assets and systems.

Events such as the tragic mosque shooting in Sainte-Foy, Quebec in 2017 and the interception of a potential bomber in Strathroy, Ontario in 2016 have underlined that Canada is not immune to violent extremism or terrorism. The Government has a variety of tools to address terrorism and violent extremism, and continues to examine what other mechanisms could bolster its approach. During the reporting period, the Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence was launched to provide national leadership and coordination as well as support to community groups, frontline practitioners and stakeholders through its Community Resilience Fund. Public Safety Canada also continued to work with its partners to enhance the Passenger Protect Program to ensure an effective government screening framework while ensuring transparency and accountability to Canadians.

The complex nature of crime requires multifaceted responses. As such, collaboration between all levels of government, including law enforcement partners, is important to keep Canadian communities safe. These efforts are particularly essential in order to keep pace with the evolving threats of criminal acts, such as those related to human trafficking, child sexual exploitation, gun violence and gang activities.

Natural disasters such as floods in Ontario and Quebec, as well as the wildfires in BC - which resulted in the longest state of emergency in BC’s history, lasting a total of 10 weeks and involving the evacuation of over 65,000 people - have emphasized the need for an Emergency Management Strategy for Canada to help ensure resilient communities and improved coordination with all partners and stakeholders.

Within the Department, work continued on fostering a workplace culture centered on mental health and wellness. The Department also implemented key workplace deliverables, in accordance with the Department’s Values and Ethics Strategic Framework and Action Plan.

With the government’s renewed focus on results, Public Safety Canada placed greater emphasis on developing robust performance and reporting structures and measures in order to reflect its commitments to enhance monitoring and by communicating clearer results while ensuring accountability to Canadians.

Key risks

Public Safety Canada’s broad mandate requires the Department to anticipate and manage ongoing and emerging risks that could impede its ability to maintain a safe and resilient Canada. As a result, the Department must be adaptable as well as flexible in order to remain at the forefront of risk mitigation. During the reporting period, Public Safety Canada focused on four key risks that had the potential to impact departmental operations.

Government Operations Centre (GOC)

The Government Operations Centre (GOC), provides a 24/7 strategic-level coordination response capacity on behalf of the Government of Canada for events affecting the national interest. The current GOC facility does not fully meet operational requirements. There is a possibility that the current infrastructure may be unable to support required efforts to coordinate an emergency response and, consequently, hamper Public Safety Canada’s objective to keep Canadians safe.

Cyber Security

The Canadian cyber landscape is rapidly evolving and becoming more complex each day. This is an ongoing risk as threat actors exploit cyber systems to access and steal Canadians’ sensitive information, and malicious cyber activities have the potential to cause serious impacts to critical infrastructure and to disrupt vital assets and systems, such as food supply, electricity grids, transportation, communications and public safety systems, on which Canadians rely.

Emergency Management

The increasing cost and complexity of natural and man-made emergencies necessitates a proactive approach in order to mitigate, prepare for, respond to and recover from disasters and their consequences. In order to ensure the resiliency of Canadian communities, Public Safety Canada needs to continue to ensure a cohesive and effective emergency management strategy that involves all partners and stakeholders.

Working Environment

Public Safety Canada is committed to improving its workplace by focusing on activities centered on culture, mental health, and wellness. The Department’s efforts to implement the Values and Ethics Strategic Framework and Action Plan ensure that the organization addresses risks related to workplace wellness, culture and retention, and excels at delivering on its mandate.

Risks
Risks Mitigating strategy and effectiveness Link to the department’s Programs Link to mandate letter commitments or to government‑wide and departmental priorities

Government Operations Centre Infrastructure (GOC)

(Existing risk)

There is a risk that the Government Operations Centre (GOC) infrastructure may be unable to support a coordinated response to large-scale or multiple and concurrent events affecting the national interest.

Strategy 1:

Ensure that the present facility maintains core operational capacity (e.g., incorporating redundancies for critical systems, such as power generation).

Mitigating Strategy Effectiveness:

During the reporting period, Public Safety Canada and its partners continued to perform critical systems testing and maintenance at the current GOC facility. The Department has reduced building occupancy to alleviate pressure on critical building infrastructure and systems. In addition, the Department worked on strengthening its technical system to minimize outages and issues.

Strategy 2:

Maintain an alternate location that is prepared to take on GOC operations at any time; arrangements for the transfer of operations to the alternate location are exercised bi-weekly.

Mitigating Strategy Effectiveness:

During the reporting period, the GOC’s alternate site closed down for renovations. An alternate site was fitted to ensure connectivity and continuity of operations during these renovations.

Public Safety Canada conducted bi-weekly connectivity and relocation exercises at the secondary alternate site. The outcomes of the regular relocation exercises are used to improve the relocation process.

Strategy 3: Implementation of the GOC new facility project to meet anticipated needs.

Mitigating Strategy Effectiveness

In May 2017, approval was received to establish new accommodations for the GOC in order to enhance the GOC’s position to be a whole-of-government asset and better respond to events of national scope. Work towards the implementation of the new facility was subsequently undertaken and continued throughout 2017-18. Public Safety Canada worked with its partners to track the project timeline and budget, which continue to be on track.

1.4 Emergency Management

Mandate letter commitments:

To lead the government’s work in keeping Canadians safe.

Public Safety Canada Corporate Priority:

Strengthen community resilience to emergencies in collaboration with provinces and territories, Indigenous communities and municipalities.

Critical Infrastructure

(Existing risk)

There is a risk that a major cyber incident impacting a vital cyber system may go undetected, unreported or unresolved, contributing to the subsequent compromise of critical infrastructure.

Strategy 1:

Deliver supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) workshops for public and private sector partners.

Mitigating Strategy Effectiveness

Public Safety Canada successfully held a multi-sectorial Industrial Control Systems (ICS) symposium hosting 180 critical infrastructure stakeholders from 10 CI sectors. The Department also hosted two ICS technical workshops. These engagement sessions resulted in increased knowledge of risks and potential mitigation measures to protect the key systems that support Canada’s critical infrastructure.

Strategy 2: Conduct cyber security exercises to promote information sharing between the critical infrastructure sectors and the Government of Canada.

Mitigating Strategy Effectiveness

Public Safety Canada collaborated with Government of Canada partners and CI stakeholders to design and participate in cyber security-related exercises aimed at assessing the sector’s response and recovery to incidents.

The planning and delivery of cyber security exercises throughout the fiscal year have proven to be both an effective engagement mechanism with stakeholders, as well as a productive method to identify potential gaps in procedures and processes related to the cyber security of critical infrastructure assets and systems.

Strategy 3: Expand the Canadian Cyber Resilience Review (CCRR) assessments to all provinces and critical infrastructure sectors as part of the Regional Resilience Assessment Program (RRAP).

Mitigating Strategy Effectiveness

In 2017-18, Public Safety Canada conducted 14 Canadian Cyber Resilience Review assessments across seven CI sectors and seven provinces. In addition, two cyber network vulnerability assessments were conducted at two sites in the Health and Government sectors.

Strategy 4: Increase stakeholders’ awareness to threats and their possible consequences, and encourage them to adopt appropriate security practices.

Mitigating Strategy Effectiveness

The Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre (CCIRC) engaged in 92 cyber threat information sharing engagements that included workshops, assessments, exercises, conferences, meetings, and presentations. These engagement events served a common purpose of informing and building awareness amongst stakeholders of various cyber threats and possible mitigation strategies.

In addition, the CCIRC has improved its ability to provide timely and relevant cyber threat information to its partners in CI through the continued enhancements to its automated information sharing tools like STIX and TAXII.

Strategy 5: Conduct a review of existing measures to protect Canadians and Canadian infrastructure from cyber threats.

Mitigating Strategy Effectiveness

In 2017-18, following the review of the cyber security landscape, Public Safety Canada led the design of  the new National Cyber Security Strategy which was announced at the end of the fiscal year. It establishes how the Government of Canada will respond more extensively and inclusively to an array of new challenges and opportunities in cyberspace in order to enhance cyber security in Canada.

1.1 National Security

Minister’s mandate letter: Work with provinces and territories, Indigenous Peoples, and municipalities to develop a comprehensive action plan that that allows Canada to better predict, prepare for and respond to weather-related emergencies and natural disasters.

Public Safety Canada Corporate Priority: Strengthen community resilience to emergencies in collaboration with provinces and territories, Indigenous communities and municipalities.

Emergency Management

(Existing risk)

There is a risk that the current approach to emergency management may not be able to sustain the increasing risk, cost and complexity of disasters.

Strategy 1:

Continue to work with provinces and territories applying for non-structural and small-scale structural projects under the National Disaster Mitigation Program (NDMP) so they are able to access funding for merit-based initiatives.

Mitigation Strategy Effectiveness:

In 2017-18, Public Safety Canada supported the approval of 107 project proposals. This represents a significant increase in the uptake by provinces and territories for the program, across all mitigation streams. This is a result of the Department’s efforts to promote the visibility of the program as well as to ensure accessibility to the recipients.

Strategy 2:

Work collaboratively with other departments to bolster the NDMP and advance various initiatives to address all-hazards.

Mitigating Strategy Effectiveness

Throughout the reporting period, Public Safety Canada worked with Infrastructure Canada to develop the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund (DMAF), which will launch in May 2018, to complement the NDMP.

Through the development of a National Risk Profile (NRP) pilot project, the Department also engaged with other federal departments through scenario evaluation workshops as well as a results validation workshop.

Strategy 3: Work in partnership with provinces and territories, Indigenous Peoples, and municipalities to develop a National Emergency Management Plan.

Mitigating Strategy Effectiveness

In May 2017, Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers Responsible for Emergency Management approved an updated Emergency Management Framework for Canada. Public Safety Canada led its development in concert with other federal, provincial and territorial partners, Indigenous communities, first responders, and academics.

Strategy 4: Advance efforts in support of prevention and treatment of post-traumatic injuries in public safety officers by working closely with federal departments (including the Health Portfolio), frontline public safety personnel, mental health organizations, academics, and provinces and territories.

Mitigating Strategy Effectiveness

Public Safety Canada supported the Canadian Institute for Public Safety Research and Treatment (CIPSRT) in the delivery of mental readiness training to public safety officers. In addition, the Department provided funding to the CIPSRT to undertake and analyze the results of a national study on public safety officer mental health.

Strategy 5: Work collaboratively with provinces and territories to bolster uptake of mitigation measures under the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements, and support the development of a residential flood insurance market in Canada.

Mitigating Strategy Effectiveness

In November 2017, Public Safety Canada hosted a National Roundtable on Flood Risk that included partners and stakeholders from the insurance industry, the private sector, non-government organizations, academia, Indigenous representatives, and all levels of government.

During the reporting period, Public Safety engaged provinces and territories on the importance of mitigation activities, particularly in advance of the publication of new DFAA guidelines.

The Department also worked with partners to improve information sharing of flood risk, and to develop financial options to address flood risks, particularly for residential properties considered to be high risk for flooding.

Strategy 6:  Engage with all levels of government and first responder communities to advance the development of a Public Safety Broadband Network.

Mitigating Strategy Effectiveness

In 2017-18, over 50 engagement sessions were held to further inform the governance and implementation models for a Canadian Public Safety Broadband Network (PSBN). Another 6 workshops were held across the country to inform a way forward for the PSBN.

1.4 Emergency Management

Minister’s mandate letter: Work with provinces and territories, Indigenous Peoples, and municipalities to develop a comprehensive action plan that that allows Canada to better predict, prepare for and respond to weather-related emergencies and natural disasters.

Public Safety Canada Corporate Priority: Strengthen community resilience to emergencies in collaboration with provinces and territories, Indigenous communities and municipalities.

Departmental Culture

(Existing risk)

There is a risk that workload pressures could negatively affect progress made to improve workplace wellness, culture and retention.

 

Strategy 1:  Continuation of cultural change activities with the goal of operating as an adaptive, caring and unified organization which excels on delivering on its mandate.

Mitigation Strategy Effectiveness:

During the fiscal year, Public Safety Canada continued to implement initiatives that advance cultural change within the workplace. Notable work was done on the creation of a Mental Health Action Plan and the Workplace Wellness Committee which were established to offer activities that help employees and encourage a positive organizational culture. The improved results of the 2017 Public Service Employee Survey indicated that these efforts are moving the Department in the right direction.

Strategy 2: Continued implementation of the Management Response and Action Plan in response to the Audit of Values and Ethics (V&E), which includes implementing the Strategic Framework for Values and Ethics and its action plan.

Mitigation Strategy Effectiveness:

Public Safety Canada completed the implementation of the Management Response and Action Plan for the Audit of Values and Ethics in 2017-18. In addition, it continued to implement activities identified in the Values and Ethics Strategic Framework and Action Plan.

Strategy 3: Continued implementation of all Branches’ action plans and initiatives in response to areas requiring attention identified in the Public Service Employee Survey.

Mitigation Strategy Effectiveness:

Public Safety Canada continued to promote activities that improve workplace culture and wellness, such as mental health-related training and town halls. The Department encouraged employees’ participation in order to stimulate discussions and suggestions for all to be part of the solution in order to maintain a healthy mental state and workplace.

1.1 National Security

1.2 Border Strategies

1.3 Countering Crime

1.4 Emergency Management

1.5 Internal Services

Government-wide priorities:

Blueprint 2020;

Federal Public Service Mental Health Strategy; and

Public Service Employee Survey

Results: what we achieved

Program 1.1 National Security

Description

The National Security Program aims to ensure that Canada is prepared for and can respond to a range of national security threats. The National Security Program plays a coordinating role in the prevention, detection, denial and response efforts of the Public Safety Portfolio and broader government departments and agencies on matters relevant to national security. In order to achieve this objective, the program works with operational and policy partners to provide the Government with strategic advice on rapidly evolving and often sensitive issues. The National Security Program also assists the Minister and Deputy Minister in fulfilling key statutory obligations and seeks to identify and close gaps in Canada’s ability to deal with national security threats. It coordinates, analyses and develops policies, and implements processes related to issues such as critical infrastructure, cyber security, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and counter terrorism. Because of their complexity, importance, and potential impact on individual rights, national security legislation, programs, and policies must be well founded, well governed, and well executed. This program plays a central role in supporting decision makers in achieving this goal on behalf of Canadians.

Results

During the reporting period, Public Safety Canada led the development of policy proposals and options on a wide range of national security issues, notably on mandate items and concerns that emerged from national security consultations held in 2016.

Public Safety Canada collaborated with partners to advance counter-terrorism efforts, namely by beginning outreach and engagement activities with provincial partners on the Federal Terrorism Response Plan. The Department also continued to demonstrate a commitment to transparency by announcing the National Transparency Commitment in June 2017, and in talking to Canadians about the terrorist threat to Canada by releasing the annual Public Terrorism Threat Report in December 2017, which was developed in concert with federal partners.

In June 2017, Bill C-59, An Act respecting national security matters was introduced. This comprehensive legislation covers a wide range of measures informed by consultations with Canadians, and would enhance Canada’s national security while safeguarding Canadians’ rights and freedoms. This legislation and other measures would enhance accountability and transparency, improve the Secure Air Travel Act and the Security of Canada Information Sharing Act, and strengthen security and protect rights through modernizing the Canadian Security Intelligence Service Act, establishing the Communications Security Establishment Act, and other legislative updates. In order to strengthen accountability and increase transparency, the legislation would create the new National Security and Intelligence Review Agency (NSRIA). The NSRIA would complement the work of the National Security and Intelligence Committee of Parliamentarians, which was established through Bill C-22 and which received Royal Assent in June 2017. Together, they would enable an integrated examination of all national security and intelligence activities. The Department also continued to advance the enhanced Passenger Protect Program project which serves as a rigorous centralized screening to identify individuals suspected of posing a threat to transportation security as well as a redress mechanism for legitimate air travellers who are affected by the program.  

The Department continued to work closely with federal partners on ways to update Canada's counter-proliferation framework. Through the Counter-Proliferation Policy Working Group, the Department played a leadership role in coordinating 15 departments and agencies to develop a path forward to advance Canada’s national security interests in addressing modern proliferation threats and challenges.

Internationally, Public Safety Canada contributed to broader Government objectives of increased security cooperation with allies. Through the G7 Roma-Lyon Group, the Department exchanged views and best practices on issues such as counter-terrorism, foreign terrorist fighters, countering violent extremism, and battlefield data. The Department also successfully proposed a new Canadian-led G7 project assessing the role of Gender-Based Analysis+ in counter-terrorism policy and program development, and led work to prepare for the G7 Security Ministers meeting to be held in April 2018.

In 2017-18, Public Safety Canada continued to lead national efforts to enhance the resilience of Canada's critical infrastructure (CI) by sharing information and providing guidance to partners and stakeholders to encourage them to adopt an all-hazards risk management approach.  The Regional Resilience Assessment Program (RRAP) and Virtual Risk Analysis Cell (VRAC) engaged with a range of CI stakeholders on how to enhance the risk-management approaches for the two programs. In particular, consultations occurred multilaterally and bilaterally with provinces and territories on how to expand provincial/territorial participation in the RRAP, including in delivering site assessments. Both the RRAP and VRAC underwent an evaluation during the reporting period with the results confirming that both programs rate strongly on performance, efficiency, and relevance to the Public Safety mandate.

During the reporting period, Public Safety Canada launched a health of the sector networks survey to assess the current state of the ten CI sector networks. The Department also continued strengthening its CI engagement through the National Cross Sector Forum (NCSF) and Multi-Sector Network (MSN) to address the evolving risk and threat landscape. Specifically, the MSN contributed to the development of an NCSF Action Plan (2018-2020), which was endorsed by the NCSF in December 2017. Further, NCSF identified three national CI priorities: cyber security, extreme weather events, and aging infrastructure, which will be used to inform future engagements.

As part of the review of the cyber security landscape, including a national consultation, the Government heard strong calls for federal leadership on cyber security. In response, working with federal partners, the Department finalized the new National Cyber Security Strategy, setting out Canada’s vision for a security and prosperity in the digital age. Budget 2018 announced funding for the strategy and the creation of the Canadian Centre for Cyber Security and the RCMP National Cybercrime Unit, to better protect Canadians and bolster Canada’s cyber security posture.

The Department also formally launched the Canada Centre for Community Engagement and Prevention of Violence (Canada Centre) to provide national leadership on Canada’s efforts to prevent radicalization to violence. As part of its commitment to develop a national strategy on countering radicalization to violence, the Canada Centre conducted over 100 stakeholder engagement sessions from September to December 2017, involving over 275 different organizations from across the country.

Furthermore, the Canada Centre organized and participated in a number of events in Canada and abroad to build and enhance partnerships with government officials, law enforcement practitioners, and academics to shape local-level intervention programs across the country. Public Safety Canada held a first open call for proposals under the Community Resilience Fund, which provides financial assistance to organizations undertaking programming and research to address radicalization to violence in Canada.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

Canada is prepared to intervene and can respond to national security threats

Percentage of annual national security priorities on which action has been taken

100%

March 31, 2018

100%

100%

100%

Canada’s critical infrastructure is resilient

Critical Infrastructure Resilience ScoreFootnote2

45Footnote3

March 31, 2018

37.13

37.3Footnote4

36.43

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

29,645,423

29,645,423

28,342,410

26,584,284

(3,061,139)

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

229

206

(23)

Program 1.2 Border Strategies

Description

The Border Strategies Program provides federal policy leadership, coordination and coherence on a variety of border issues, such as customs, immigration, refugees and citizenship, and cross-border law enforcement, in order to ensure that security objectives are achieved in a manner that facilitates the flow of legitimate trade and travel and reduces security and fraud related risks. The intent of this program is to promote the safety and economic well-being of Canadians through supporting secure and efficient management of Canada’s borders. This program also advances critical infrastructure objectives through effective coordination among federal departments and agencies, as well as partnerships with industry sectors. In order to achieve this result, the program develops and supports a focused border management agenda and leads ongoing dialogue between Canada and the United States on strategic and operational border policy issues, including the implementation of the Beyond the Border Action plan. The program implements cross-border arrangements relating to the movement of goods and people during emergencies, and provides policy advice, leadership and horizontal coordination to Public Safety Portfolio agencies and other federal departments regarding border issues. This program plays a central role in supporting the Government in making fully informed decisions concerning border policy, border management and cross-border law enforcement for the benefit of Canadians.

Results

Public Safety Canada provided advice and guidance to foster and support a number of strategic, whole-of-government approaches to border management and law enforcement issues. This included applying a security lens to visa policy reviews, and other immigration initiatives such as annual immigration levels, managing irregular migration, Passenger Name Record data sharing, Entry/Exit, First Nations border crossing issues, and monitoring the progress of the Electronic Travel Authorization (ETA) initiative.

Public Safety Canada established an ad-hoc working group with the United States to discuss bilateral border management and security issues, in particular, northbound asylum flows. This working group met four times during the reporting period, twice in Ottawa and twice in Washington, and will continue to promote and enhance Canada's cross-border policing partnerships and law enforcement information sharing, and support intelligence-driven strategic and operational responses to existing and emerging border threats.

In 2017-18, a major preclearance milestone was reached: the Preclearance Act, 2016 received Royal Assent in December 2017. Work continued to develop regulations and advance implementation issues to prepare for the coming into force of the legislation. Additionally, a binational rail cargo pre-screening pilot was launched in November 2017 at the Lacolle, Quebec/Champlain, New York port of entry. In addition, a cost recovery framework was agreed to by both countries and the technical design standards for new preclearance facilities in Canada were finalized.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

Secure borders that facilitate legitimate trade and travel

Percentage of Public Safety-led border management initiatives identified in the annual PS Business Plans that are achieved

70%

March 31, 2018

80%Footnote5

78 %

N/AFootnote6

Progress made towards the implementation of the new Land, Rail, Marine and Air Preclearance  Agreement

30% annually for 3 years (cumulative target)

2017-18

30%

30%

20%

 

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

2,338,110

2,338,110

12,821,992

10,956,822

8,618,712

 

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

24

31

7

Program 1.3 Countering Crime

Description

Crime is a significant preoccupation among Canadians and they recognize the importance of the federal government’s role in responding to crime issues across the country. The Countering Crime Program provides federal policy leadership, coordination, research and program support on a continuum of activities related to the prevention of crime, the enforcement of law and the rehabilitation of those who have committed criminal offences. The intent of this program is to reduce the likelihood of criminality by working in close collaboration with federal partners, and those in the provinces, territories and communities to design and deliver national programs that are specific and appropriate to regions and communities.

Indigenous Community Corrections Initiative

The Department launched its new Indigenous Community Corrections Initiative to help communities reintegrate Indigenous offenders back into the community and develop alternatives to incarceration.  This initiative, with $8.7M in contribution dollars, is designed to help reverse the trend of Indigenous over-representation in Canada's criminal justice system.

Results

Public Safety Canada made significant progress in advancing the legalization and strict regulation of cannabis.  The Department supported the introduction and review of new legislation (Bills C-45 and C-46); secured related funding for law enforcement, including $81 million over five years to support provinces and territories in enforcing new laws related to drug-impaired driving; hosted a Cannabis Research Symposium; and launched the Don’t Drive High public education and awareness campaign.

Public Safety Canada also supported the development of Canadian Standards for Oral Fluid Drug Screening Devices, funded a forensic laboratory to develop a testing methodology and synthetic oral fluid for testing of devices, and published a Report on the Oral Fluid Drug Screening Device Pilot Project.

With respect to the opioid crisis in Canada, an inventory of Law Enforcement Responses to Opioids was developed in consultation with other federal departments to ensure a fully coordinated approach to the crisis. Public Safety Canada also supported the Law Enforcement Roundtable on the Opioid Crisis where key stakeholders discussed issues of mutual concern, and identified best practices, gaps and next steps.

The Department continued to press forward on the review of regulations and policies that control firearms in order to prioritize public safety. To this effect, the Department’s efforts included leading the development of major new firearms legislation (Bill C-71) proposing to enhance background checks, improve the effectiveness of the existing licensing regime, ensure consistency in the firearms classification system, tighten requirements regarding the transportation of restricted and prohibited firearms, and standardize existing best practices with respect to record-keeping by commercial businesses. The legislation was introduced in Parliament in March 2018.

Initiatives to counter diverse crime issues, such as gun and gang violence, contraband tobacco, and gender-based violence have a prominent place on Public Safety Canada’s agenda. During the reporting period, the Department organized and hosted a Summit on Gun and Gang Violence to engage stakeholders and provide them an opportunity to share challenges, opportunities and best practices in the fight against gun crime and in combatting the deadly effects of guns and gangs in communities across Canada. The Summit took place following the Government of Canada announcement of $327.6 million over five years and information gathered during the event will help inform the government’s way forward for the Guns and Gangs Program.

The Department also worked closely with Health Canada in the development of Canada’s new tobacco control strategy; continued to lead the federal taskforce on Human Trafficking; and worked with partners to modernize the National Strategy for the Protection of Children from Sexual Exploitation on the Internet. Due to competing departmental priorities and limited resources, the Federal, Provincial and Territorial National Coordinating Committee on Organized Crime (NCC) delayed its meeting to the Fall of 2018 and, as such, the Department did not advance a transnational organized crime strategy in 2017-18.

Public Safety Canada continued to work in collaboration with provinces and territories to broaden the scope of crime prevention research and project development. The Department carried out the production of a publicly available searchable database of crime prevention programs in Canada (the Crime Prevention Inventory) and worked closely with the MaRS Centre for Impact Investing to establish an innovative crime prevention initiative that will use a social finance payment mechanism and that will facilitate a more efficient use of resources.

Throughout the reporting period, the Department sustained a variety of efforts as part of its commitment to review the criminal justice system. Namely, it supported the introduction of Bill C-56, An Act to amend the Corrections and Conditional Release Act and the Abolition of Early Parole Act, to provide support to the most vulnerable inmates in federal correctional institutions. The legislation introduces comprehensive reforms to administrative segregation and builds on investments to expand mental health capacity in correctional facilities to support Indigenous offenders.

In maintaining its focus on renewing nation to nation relationships with Indigenous Canadians, the Department completed all relevant actions recommended following the 2014-15 Evaluation of the First Nations Policing Program (FNPP) during the reporting period. In parallel, Public Safety Canada secured additional federal investment of up to $291.2 million over five years for the FNPP, which culminated in the Minister of Public Safety’s announcement of additional funding to support existing FNPP policing services that are professional, dedicated and responsive to the First Nation and Inuit communities they serve across the country.

With regards to policing policy, Public Safety Canada continued to explore ways to advance efficiencies as part of the ongoing Economics of Policing and Community Safety Initiative. This included commissioning the Contemporary Policing Functions study and report, which provided a snapshot of responsibilities of police agencies at the national, provincial and municipal levels, and in First Nations communities. 

In light of the Government of Canada’s efforts in terms of Major International Events and in anticipation of the G7 Leaders’ Summit and Ministerial meetings, the Department worked in collaboration with its partners to support the planning of security and policing activities. Namely, the Department was responsible for administering the Major International Event Security Cost Framework, which included negotiating and finalizing a contribution agreement with the Province of Quebec. An evaluation of the Framework was also undertaken to review activities and to ensure that the program continues to be efficient and effective. The recommendations from the evaluation will be implemented in 2018-19.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

Canadian communities are safe

Percentage of Canadians that think that crime in their neighbour-hood remained unchanged or decreased over the previous five years

≥ previous period (68%, 2009)Footnote7

March 31, 2018

N/AFootnote8

N/AFootnote9

83%

The body of knowledge related to countering crime is increased

Number of knowledge-oriented resources (research reports, practice-oriented tools, communities of practice and learning events, presentations etc.) that are produced and disseminated

20-30 per year

March 31, 2018

59

110

N/AFootnote10

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

213,711,559

213,711,559

209,850,845

182,951,206

(30,760,353)

 

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

224

233

9

Program 1.4 Emergency Management

Description

Public Safety Canada works to protect Canada and Canadians by exercising national leadership in emergency management and setting a clear direction for emergency management for the Government of Canada, pursuant to the Emergency Management Act of 2007. Using a risk-based approach, and working closely with federal institutions, provinces, territories, the emergency responder community, the private sector, non-government organizations and international counterparts to address all hazards (natural, technological and human-induced), this Program contributes to a safe and resilient Canada through policy and program development, stakeholder outreach, and coordination across the four functions of emergency management - prevention/mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery.

The Program conducts and coordinates research, risk assessment, long term policy development and planning to strengthen its coherence and its contribution to national EM leadership; administers exercises and training; coordinates and monitors the federal government’s capacity to manage and respond to whole-of-government emergencies; provides support to provinces and territories to enhance their capacities; and promotes improved standardization and a culture of continual improvement through the collection, analysis and utilization of lessons learned and best practices. The Program also promotes public awareness of emergency management directly through outreach and various emergency management fora.

Emergency Management

Results

During the reporting period, severe weather events had a profound and lasting effect on communities across the country. Public Safety Canada, through the Government Operations Centre (GOC), led a strategic coordinated federal response to the floods across Canada, and the wildfires in British Columbia and the Prairies, which included one of the largest evacuations in British Columbia’s history.

In addition, Public Safety Canada liaised closely with British Columbia, Manitoba, Quebec and New Brunswick in order to coordinate response plans and efforts in relation to asylum seekers at Canada’s borders.

In parallel, the Department advanced the work to modernize the mandate and operations of the GOC, including plans and designs for the GOC accommodations project. As part of this work, consultations with federal partners were completed to inform ongoing work to renew the Federal Emergency Response Plan and ensure a whole-of-government response during events of national interest.

In addition to matching donations to the Canadian Red Cross to support flood and fire evacuations, Public Safety Canada, through the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA), provided close to $600 million in 2017-18 to support provinces and territories in response and recovery efforts for natural disasters, and advanced payment of $175 million to support British Columbia for costs incurred during the 2017 Wildfires.

In May 2017, Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers Responsible for Emergency Management approved an updated Emergency Management Framework for Canada. First issued ten years ago, the Framework consolidates F/P/T collaboration relating to emergency management, and provides a launching pad for the joint development of a Canadian Emergency Management Strategy. This framework entails cooperative efforts with government departments, agencies, first responders, academia, and Indigenous communities. A GBA+ analysis was conducted in parallel to inform the development of the Strategy, setting a course toward a more resilient future for Canadian society by 2030 through the adoption of a whole-of-society approach to emergency management and disaster risk reduction.

In addition, Public Safety Canada hosted a National Roundtable on Flood Risk in Regina in November 2017. This roundtable brought together an extensive range of flood risk management partners to collaborate and share information, knowledge, and perspectives on increasing risk awareness and how to advance cooperation around financial risk management of floods. Public Safety Canada also continued to advance the development of the Federal Flood Mapping Guidelines Series, publishing the “Federal Airborne LiDAR Data Acquisition Guideline” and “Bibliography of Best Practices and References for Flood Mitigation” in September 2017.

Natural disasters are becoming more frequent and severe, underscoring the importance of upstream investments in mitigation measures. As such, Public Safety Canada collaborated with Infrastructure Canada during 2017-2018 in the development of the Terms and Conditions of the Disaster Mitigation and Adaptation Fund (DMAF). This included consultations with provinces and territories on program design as well as technical and financial eligibility criteria.  Investments under this new fund will contribute toward community resilience by protecting vital assets and systems from extreme weather and natural disasters. It complements efforts by Public Safety Canada to increase uptake for its National Disaster Mitigation Program (NDMP), which supports small and large-scale non-structural and structural mitigation projects. The Department also continued to encourage the use of the DFAA mitigation provisions, by clarifying program guidelines.

Public Safety Canada collaborated with Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) to develop a pilot National Risk Profile to establish an evidence-based approach for national risk assessment. The pilot was designed to provide decision-makers and practitioners with an understanding of the threats posing the greatest risk to Canadians and supports the departmental response to the 2016 Audit on Mitigating the Impacts of Severe Weather carried out by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada (OAG).

With respect to search and rescue, engagement with multi-sector stakeholders occurred through 2017 to obtain support and agreement on the need to define a national search and rescue (SAR) policy framework and to strengthen governance for Canada’s search and rescue community. In partnership with the Manitoba Office of the Fire Commissioner, the 2017 SARscene was held in Winnipeg, Manitoba, where over 200 delegates participated in a number of sessions to share best practices, tools and ideas supporting the SAR community and to showcase major projects.

In 2017-2018, the Department provided funding to the Canadian Institute for Public Safety Research and Treatment (CIPSRT) to undertake a national prevalence survey on public safety officer mental health. Over 5,000 public safety officers completed the survey. The results clearly indicated a continued need for coordinated national research investments in order to better understand, and support, the mental health needs of public safety officers.

As part of Budget 2018, the Government announced $20 million over five years to support a new national research consortium between the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and CIPSRT at the University of Regina, and $10 million over 5 years for Public Safety Canada to work with CIPSRT to develop an Internet-based Cognitive Behavioural Therapy pilot as a means of providing greater access to care and treatment for public safety personnel across Canada. These initiatives represent concrete action taken in support of the Government’s commitment to establish an Action Plan on Post-Traumatic Stress Injuries.

During the reporting period, the Department also worked to put in place the Memorial Grant Program for First Responders, a grant program announced in Budget 2017 to support the families of public safety officers who have died in the line of duty.

Results Achieved
Expected results Performance indicators Target Date to achieve target 2017–18 Actual results 2016–17 Actual results 2015–16 Actual results

Canadians are prepared for and can respond to both natural and human-induced hazards and disasters

Percentage of identified Federal/Provincial/Territorial emergency management partners participating in Public Safety Canada-led multi-lateral fora

100%

2017-2018

100%

100%

N/A

 

Budgetary Financial resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference(Actual spending minus Planned spending)

757,517,869

757,517,869

798,249,818

680,843,474

(76,674,395)

 

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

253

245

(8)

Information on Public Safety Canada’s lower-level programs is available in the GC InfoBase.

 

Internal Services

Description

Internal Services are those groups of related activities and resources that the federal government considers to be services in support of programs and/or required to meet corporate obligations of an organization. Internal Services refers to the activities and resources of the 10 distinct service categories that support Program delivery in the organization, regardless of the Internal Services delivery model in a department. The 10 service categories are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; and Acquisition Services.

Results

During the reporting period, Public Safety Canada completed the implementation of the remaining recommendations that stemmed from the 2014 Audit of Values and Ethics. A key deliverable from the audit − the Values and Ethics Strategic Framework and Action Plan − continues to be implemented.

Notable initiatives accomplished included planning a Respect in the Workplace Campaign for 2018-19, holding two “mental health weeks” (in May and October), and providing Employee Assistance Services and Informal Conflict Management, which supported the management and resolution of workplace conflicts.

To help efforts to build a healthier workplace culture, support and secretariat services were provided to the Culture Connect Working Group and the departmental ambassadors for workplace wellness. Public Safety Canada collaborated with other federal organizations through partnerships and information sharing regarding best practices to inform these initiatives. The results stemming from these workplace wellness initiatives were measured through a performance measurement framework which will enable the Department to gauge results in the next Public Service Employee Survey (PSES).

In addition to these activities, the Deputy Ministers launched two employee engagement initiatives to address the workload issues highlighted by the PSES: a Task Force on Efficiencies, to explore and implement employees’ ideas about business process improvements; and a Task Force on Staffing, to explore and implement employees’ ideas to improve staffing processes, recruitment and retention.

In 2017-18, the Department strengthened its relationship with Information Technology (IT) Services partners by participating in ongoing government-wide Information Management (IM) and IT initiatives. Through these collective initiatives, Public Safety Canada improved and updated the reliability as well as the availability of its IM and IT networks in order to strengthen efficiencies within a common information platform. To effectively manage the Department’s security program and enhance risk-based security decision-making, Public Safety Canada completed multiple assessments of its security posture required to inform the 2017-20 Departmental Security Plan and has successfully achieved its planned security activities and deliverables for the 2017-18 fiscal year.

During the reporting period, Public Safety Canada conducted several audits and evaluations. The Department completed the Audit of Grants and Contributions to assess the adequacy, effectiveness and efficiency of grants and contributions funding decisions as well as the agreement administration processes. A Laser Audit of IT Asset Management was completed in order to provide assurance that IT asset management controls are in place and effective. Both audits concluded that, while key controls are in place, improvements are required to ensure effectiveness and efficiency of departmental controls and processes. Implementation of all recommended actions stemming from both audits is expected to be completed by the end of 2018-19.

Public Safety Canada also participated as the lead security agency in the Horizontal Audit of Business Continuity Planning, led by the Office of the Comptroller General. In collaboration with other participating security agencies, the Department is committed to implementing the actions in response to the audit recommendations.

Moreover, the following evaluations from the Departmental Evaluation Plan were completed: Evaluation of the Regional Resilience Assessment Program and the Virtual Risk Analysis Cell; Evaluation of the National Flagging System; Evaluation of the National Action Plan to Combat Human Trafficking; Evaluation of the Major International Events Security Cost Framework and the Evaluation of the National Crime Prevention Strategy. A review of the National Office for Victims was also conducted in 2017-18.

In compliance with the general guidelines and requirements of the Government of Canada Policy on Results, these evaluations assessed the relevance (i.e. continued need for these programs) and performance (i.e., extent to which they achieved their objectives) of these programs. Although these programs were found to be relevant, recommendations were developed for the Department to act on identified opportunities for improvement.

Public Safety Canada participated in a number of Horizontal Evaluations that were led by other government departments, including the Evaluation of Matrimonial Real Property with Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, the Evaluation of the Horizontal Coordination Function of the Family Violence Initiative led by the Public Health Agency of Canada, and the final Evaluation of the National Anti-Drug Strategy led by Justice Canada. Evaluation findings and report recommendations have been successfully addressed, and actions are being tracked.

The Department built on its achievement of using social media and pursued innovative approaches to engage in meaningful on-going dialogue with Canadians. Digital-forward communications methods were developed and used to reach a diverse public during the reporting period. For instance, an Instagram account was created to engage with youth and young adults on cyber safety-related issues.

The use of social media was part of a larger multi-year marketing and advertising campaign, Don’t Drive High, to raise awareness about drug-impaired driving. The objective of the campaign is to raise awareness as well as educate the public and is built on insights from public opinion research studies and focus group testing. The primary target audience was Canadian youth ranging between the ages of 16-24. This age group was targeted as it continues to represent the largest segment of the population to test positive for drugs following fatal car crashes.

Public Safety Canada saw the successful launch of a dedicated Facebook presence—a Messenger “chatbot” interacted with over 50,000 Canadians through posts about the risks of drug-impaired driving, with over 20,000 using the bot to safely “Find a Ride Home”. The Department formalized partnerships with key stakeholders such as MADD Canada, Canadian Automobile Association, Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police, and Young Drivers of Canada. Moreover, the helming of a F/P/T working group on drug-impaired driving public education ensured ongoing collaboration and consultation with partners, as well as the effective launch of numerous advertising initiatives such as television and signage in various locations, in addition to social media. Public Safety Canada will be undertaking a survey in year 2019-20 to track changes in attitudes and awareness against the initiative’s baseline survey.

In order to support the inclusion of robust Gender-Based Analysis Plus (GBA+) into the development of all relevant departmental initiatives and activities, Public Safety Canada established a GBA+ Advisors Network throughout the Department. Their role is to support and ensure GBA+ is integrated across the organization, as well as promote available tools and capacity building opportunities.

Public Safety Canada continued to lead and engage with Portfolio and other government departments to advance whole-of-government safety and security priorities. The Department developed and implemented performance measurement and reporting structures that track progress on the implementation of mandate commitments. In general, Public Safety Canada ensured sound management practices by strengthening its forecasting and financial reporting process in order to respond to the federal government’s renewed focus on results.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2017–18 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2017–18 Difference (Actual spending minus Planned spending)

49,380,898

49,380,898

57,746,192

57,735,831

8,354,933

 

Human Resources (full-time equivalents)
2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Difference (Actual full-time equivalents minus Planned full-time equivalents)

410

404

(6)

Information on Public Safety Canada’s lower-level programs is available on the Public Safety Canada’s website and in the TBS InfoBase.

Analysis of trends in spending and human resources

Actual expenditures

Departmental spending trend graph

Departmental spending trend graph

Image description

This graph illustrates the Department's spending over a six-year period starting in 2015-16 and ending in 2020-21. The graph is based on three years of actual spending and three years of planned spending. In fiscal year 2015-16, actual departmental spending was $407 million with $14 million coming from statutory spending and $393 million from voted spending.  In 2016-17, actual departmental spending was $1.198 billion with $14 million coming from statutory spending and $1.183 billion from voted spending. In 2017-18, actual departmental spending was $959 million with $15 million coming from statutory spending and $944 million from voted spending.

Next fiscal year's, 2018-19, estimated planned spending is $1.162 billion with $16 million from statutory spending and $1.146 billion from voted spending. In 2019-20, the estimated planned spending is $580 million with $15 million from statutory spending and $565 million from voted spending. In 2020-21, the estimated planned spending is $516 million with $15 million from statutory spending and $501 million from voted spending.

These three planned spending totals do not include Sunset Program funding. The Sunset Programs – Anticipated figures are shown in the year following the expiration for information purposes to indicate the reduced funding available to the Department. For 2018-19, the sunset programs anticipated figure is $44 million, for 2019-20, $81 million and for 2020-21, $74 million.

Note: Planned spending totals for fiscal years 2018-19, 2019-20 and 2020-21 do not include Sunset Program funding. Sunset Programs are time-limited programs that do not have ongoing funding and policy authority. Sunset Programs – Anticipated figures are shown above in the year following the expiration, for information purposes, to indicate the reduced funding available to the Department.

Budgetary performance summary for Programs and Internal Services (dollars)
Programs and Internal Services 2017–18 Main Estimates 2017–18 Planned spending 2018–19 Planned spending 2019–20 Planned spending 2017–18 Total authorities available for use 2017–18 Actual spending (authorities used) 2016–17 Actual spending (authorities used) 2015–16 Actual spending (authorities used)

National

Security

29,645,423

29,645,423

32,000,684

28,951,885

28,342,410

26,584,284

47,330,324

24,346,071

Border Strategies

2,338,110

2,338,110

2,840,319

2,833,552

12,821,992

10,956,822

3,582,815

3,902,107

Countering

Crime

213,711,559

213,711,559

362,363,325

296,759,136

209,850,845

182,951,206

171,440,360

148,943,506

Emergency

Management

757,517,869

757,517,869

711,468,727

200,736,497

798,249,818

680,843,474

922,575,019

175,134,875

Subtotal

1,003,212,961

1,003,212,961

1,108,673,055

529,281,070

1,049,265,065

901,335,786

1,144,928,518

352,326,559

Internal Services

49,380,898

49,380,898

53,074,989

50,881,291

57,746,192

57,735,831

52,683,418

54,456,168

Total

1,052,593,859

1,052,593,859

1,161,748,044

580,162,361

1,107,011,257

959,071,617

1,197,611,936

406,782,727

Actual spending for 2017-18 is $238.5 million (20%) lower than expenditures in 2016-17. The decrease is mainly as a result of:

Offset by:

In 2017-18, the Main Estimates and Planned Spending increased by $54.4 million (5%) to a Total Authorities Available for Use of $1,107.0 million. The increase is mainly due to:

Offset by: 

Actual human resources

Human resources summary for Programs and Internal Services (full‑time equivalents)
Programs and Internal Services 2015–16 Actual full-time equivalents 2016–17 Actual full-time equivalents 2017–18 Planned full-time equivalents 2017–18 Actual full-time equivalents 2018–19 Planned full-time equivalents 2019–20 Planned full-time equivalents

National

Security

166

192

229

206

236

226

Border Strategies

29

31

24

31

-

-

Countering

Crime

204

227

224

233

293

289

Emergency

Management

214

262

253

245

260

257

Subtotal

613

712

730

715

789

772

Internal Services

391

411

410

404

443

443

Total

1,004

1,123

1,140

1,119

1,232

1,215

The increase of 119 full-time equivalent (FTEs) (12%) from 1,004 FTEs in 2015-16 to 1,123 FTEs in 2016-17 Actual is mainly due to the commencement of new initiatives in 2016-17, such as Phase II of Canada's Cyber Security Strategy and the creation of the Office for Community Outreach and Countering Radicalization to Violence. A large portion of the increase is also attributed to the fact that many positions were vacant in 2015-16 within National Security and Emergency Management as a result of attrition. Since then, staffing actions took place to fill those vacancies, increasing the 2016-17 actual FTEs.

The decrease of 21 FTEs from 2017-18 Planned FTEs to 2017-18 Actual FTEs is mainly due to delays in staffing and unanticipated departures. Planned FTEs in 2018-19 will see an increase of 113 FTEs (10%) from 1,119 Actuals FTEs in 2017-18 to 1,232 in 2018-19. The increase is due mostly to the continuation of hiring employees in support of the implementation of an initiative to build capacity to address drug impaired driving in Canada and the hiring of employees in support of the creation of the Memorial Grant Program for First Responders. In Budget 2017, the Government of Canada committed to establishing a compensation program to support the families of public safety officers who have died in the line of duty. The Government has committed a total of $117.4 million over five years, starting in 2018–2019, and $23.4 million per year after that.

Expenditures by vote

For information on Public Safety Canada’s organizational voted and statutory expenditures, consult the Public Accounts of Canada 2017–2018.

Government of Canada spending and activities

Information on the alignment of Public Safety Canada’s spending with the Government of Canada’s spending and activities is available in theGC InfoBase.

Financial statements and financial statements highlights

Financial statements

Public Safety Canada’s financial statements [unaudited] for the year ended March 31, 2018, are available on the departmental website.

Financial statements highlights

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2017–18 Planned results 2017–18 Actualresults 2016–17 Actual results Difference (2017–18 Actual results minus 2017–18 Planned results) Difference (2017–18 Actual results minus 2016–17 Actual results)

Total expenses

1,015,434,141

1,071,022,208

1,054,862,521

55,588,067

16,159,687

Total revenues

1,800,000

2,045,173

2,063,060

(245,173)

(17,887)

Net cost of operations before government funding and transfers

1,013,634,141

1,068,977,035

1,052,799,461

55,342,894

16,177,574

Total departmental expenses have increased by $16M from $1,055M in 2016–2017 to $1,071M in 2017-18. This increase can be attributed primarily to an increase in transfer payments mainly to the Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements program (DFAA).

The chart below presents the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position by showing expenses by category as a percentage of total departmental accrual accounting expenses. Transfer payments represent 83.4 percent of the total $1,071M Public Safety Canada expenses. Salaries and employees benefits represent 12 percent; professional and special services 1.6 percent; accommodation 1.3 percent; and other expenses which include travel and relocation, equipment, communication, equipment rentals, amortization, repairs, utilities, material and supplies represent 1.7 percent.

Statement of Operations  and Departmental Net Financial Position

Image description

This chart presents the Statement of Operations and Departmental Net Financial Position by showing expenses by category as a percentage of total departmental accrual accounting expenses. Transfer payments represent 83.4% of expenses which amounts to $892 million; salaries and employee benefits account for 12% which is $128 million; professional and special services is 1.6% with $17 million; accommodation is 1.3% at $14 million; and other expenses, which include travel and relocation, equipment, communication, equipment rentals, amortization, repairs, bad debt expense, utilities, material and supplies, account for 1.7% or $19 million of total expenses.

Condensed Statement of Operations (unaudited) for the year ended March 31, 2018 (dollars)
Financial information 2017–18 2016–17 Difference (2017–18 minus 2016–17)

Total net liabilities

2,471,946,267

2,306,037,991

165,908,276

Total net financial assets

496,986,419

473,083,446

23,902,973

Departmental net debt

1,974,959,848

1,832,954,545

142,005,303

Total non-financial assets

12,487,291

13,668,012

(1,180,721)

Departmental net financial position

(1,962,472,557)

(1,819,286,533)

(143,186,024)

Public Safety Canada's total net liabilities include accounts payable and accrued liabilities of $495M, vacation pay and compensatory leave of $6M, employee future benefits of $5M and DFAA liabilities of $1,966M. The increase of $166M in total net liabilities is mainly attributed to an increase in the DFAA accrued liabilities.

The total net financial assets include $491M due from the Consolidated Revenue Fund and accounts receivable and advances of $6M. The increase in the total net financial assets is mainly due to the increase in the Consolidated Revenue Fund.

Total net liabilities were approximately $2,472M at the end of 2017-18, an increase of 7 percent when compared to the previous year. The chart below shows total net liabilities by type of liability.

2017-18 Total Net Liabilities

2017-18 Total Net Liabilities

Image description

This chart shows total net liabilities by type of liability. Disaster Financial Assistance Arrangements (DFAA) make up 79.2% of total net liabilities at $1,966 million; accounts payable and accrued liabilities make up 20.4% at $495 million; and vacation pay, compensatory leave and employee future benefits make up 0.4% with $11 million.

Supplementary information

Corporate information

Organizational profile

Appropriate minister: The Honourable Ralph Goodale, P.C., M.P
Institutional head: Mr. Malcolm Brown
Ministerial portfolio: Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness

Enabling instrument[s]:

Department of Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Act (2005)
Emergency Management Act (2007)

Year of incorporation / commencement: 2003

Reporting framework

Public Safety Canada’s Strategic Outcome and Program Alignment Architecture of record for 2016–17 are shown below.

  1. 1. Strategic Outcome:  Asafe and resilient Canada
  2. 1.1 Program: National Security
    1. 1.1.1 Sub-Program: National Security Leadership
    2. 1.1.2 Sub-Program: Critical Infrastructure
    3. 1.1.3 Sub-Program: Cyber Security
  3. 1.2 Program: Border Strategies
  4. 1.3 Program: Countering Crime
    1. 1.3.1 Sub-Program:  Crime Prevention
    1. 1.3.2 Sub-Program: Law Enforcement Leadership
      1. 1.3.2.1Sub-Sub-Program: Serious and Organized Crime
      2. 1.3.2.2 Sub-Sub-Program: Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Policing
      3. 1.3.2.3 Sub-Sub-Program: Aboriginal Policing
    2. 1.3.3 Sub-Program:  Corrections
  5. 1.4 Program:   Emergency Management
    1. Sub-Program: Emergency Prevention/Mitigation
    2. Sub-Program: Emergency Preparedness
    3. Sub-Program: Emergency Response
    4. Sub-Program: Emergency Recovery
  6. Internal Services

Supporting information on lower-level programs

Supporting information on results, financial and human resources relating to Public Safety Canada lower level programs is available on InfoBase and on Public Safety Canada's website.

Supplementary information tables

The following supplementary information tables are available on Public Safety Canada’s website:

Federal tax expenditures

The tax system can be used to achieve public policy objectives through the application of special measures such as low tax rates, exemptions, deductions, deferrals and credits. The Department of Finance Canada publishes cost estimates and projections for these measures each year in the Report on Federal Tax Expenditures. This report also provides detailed background information on tax expenditures, including descriptions, objectives, historical information and references to related federal spending programs. The tax measures presented in this report are the responsibility of the Minister of Finance.

Organizational contact information

General enquiries: 613-944-4875 or 1-800-830-3118

E-mail: enquiries.enquetes@ps.gc.ca

Media enquiries: 613-991-0657 or media@ps.gc.ca

Cross-Cultural Roundtable on Security (CCRS): roundtable@ps.gc.ca

National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC): 1-800-830-3118 or prevention@ps.gc.ca

National Office for Victims: 1-866-525-0554

Passenger Protect Inquiries Office: PS.PPinquiries-demandesPP.SP@canada.ca

Teletypewriter (TTY): 1-866-865-5667

Fax: 613-954-5186

Post:
269 Laurier Avenue West
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
K1A 0P8

Appendix: definitions

appropriation (crédit)
Any authority of Parliament to pay money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund.
budgetary expenditures (dépenses budgétaires)
Operating and capital expenditures; transfer payments to other levels of government, organizations or individuals; and payments to Crown corporations.
Departmental Plan (plan ministériel)
A report on the plans and expected performance of an appropriated department over a three‑year period. Departmental Plans are tabled in Parliament each spring.
Departmental Results Report (rapport sur les résultats ministériels)
A report on an appropriated department’s actual accomplishments against the plans, priorities and expected results set out in the corresponding Departmental Plan.
evaluation (évaluation)
In the Government of Canada, the systematic and neutral collection and analysis of evidence to judge merit, worth or value. Evaluation informs decision making, improvements, innovation and accountability. Evaluations typically focus on programs, policies and priorities and examine questions related to relevance, effectiveness and efficiency. Depending on user needs, however, evaluations can also examine other units, themes and issues, including alternatives to existing interventions. Evaluations generally employ social science research methods.
experimentation (expérimentation)
Activities that seek to explore, test and compare the effects and impacts of policies, interventions and approaches, to inform evidence-based decision-making, by learning what works and what does not.
full‑time equivalent (équivalent temps plein)
A measure of the extent to which an employee represents a full person‑year charge against a departmental budget. Full‑time equivalents are calculated as a ratio of assigned hours of work to scheduled hours of work. Scheduled hours of work are set out in collective agreements.
gender-based analysis plus (GBA+) (analyse comparative entre les sexes plus [ACS+])
An analytical approach used to assess how diverse groups of women, men and gender-diverse people may experience policies, programs and initiatives. The “plus” in GBA+ acknowledges that the gender-based analysis goes beyond biological (sex) and socio-cultural (gender) differences. We all have multiple identity factors that intersect to make us who we are; GBA+ considers many other identity factors, such as race, ethnicity, religion, age, and mental or physical disability. Examples of GBA+ processes include using data disaggregated by sex, gender and other intersecting identity factors in performance analysis, and identifying any impacts of the program on diverse groups of people, with a view to adjusting these initiatives to make them more inclusive.
government-wide priorities (priorités pangouvernementales)
For the purpose of the 2017–18 Departmental Results Report, those high-level themes outlining the government’s agenda in the 2015 Speech from the Throne, namely: Growth for the Middle Class; Open and Transparent Government;  A Clean Environment and a Strong Economy; Diversity is Canada’s Strength; and Security and Opportunity.
horizontal initiative (initiative horizontale)
An initiative where two or more departments are given funding to pursue a shared outcome, often linked to a government priority.
Management, Resources and Results Structure (structure de gestion, des ressources et des résultats)
A comprehensive framework that consists of an organization’s inventory of programs, resources, results, performance indicators and governance information. Programs and results are depicted in their hierarchical relationship to each other and to the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute. The Management, Resources and Results Structure is developed from the Program Alignment Architecture.
non‑budgetary expenditures (dépenses non budgétaires)
Net outlays and receipts related to loans, investments and advances, which change the composition of the financial assets of the Government of Canada.
performance (rendement)
What an organization did with its resources to achieve its results, how well those results compare to what the organization intended to achieve, and how well lessons learned have been identified.
performance indicator (indicateur de rendement)
A qualitative or quantitative means of measuring an output or outcome, with the intention of gauging the performance of an organization, program, policy or initiative respecting expected results.
performance reporting (production de rapports sur le rendement)
The process of communicating evidence‑based performance information. Performance reporting supports decision making, accountability and transparency.
plan (plan)
The articulation of strategic choices, which provides information on how an organization intends to achieve its priorities and associated results. Generally a plan will explain the logic behind the strategies chosen and tend to focus on actions that lead up to the expected result.
planned spending (dépenses prévues)
For Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports, planned spending refers to those amounts that receive Treasury Board approval by February 1. Therefore, planned spending may include amounts incremental to planned expenditures presented in the Main Estimates.
A department is expected to be aware of the authorities that it has sought and received. The determination of planned spending is a departmental responsibility, and departments must be able to defend the expenditure and accrual numbers presented in their Departmental Plans and Departmental Results Reports.
priority (priorité)
A plan or project that an organization has chosen to focus and report on during the planning period. Priorities represent the things that are most important or what must be done first to support the achievement of the desired Strategic Outcome(s) or Departmental Results.
program (programme)
A group of related resource inputs and activities that are managed to meet specific needs and to achieve intended results and that are treated as a budgetary unit.
Program Alignment Architecture (architecture d’alignement des programmes)
A structured inventory of an organization’s programs depicting the hierarchical relationship between programs and the Strategic Outcome(s) to which they contribute.
result (résultat)
An external consequence attributed, in part, to an organization, policy, program or initiative. Results are not within the control of a single organization, policy, program or initiative; instead they are within the area of the organization’s influence.
statutory expenditures (dépenses législatives)
Expenditures that Parliament has approved through legislation other than appropriation acts. The legislation sets out the purpose of the expenditures and the terms and conditions under which they may be made.
Strategic Outcome (résultat stratégique)
A long‑term and enduring benefit to Canadians that is linked to the organization’s mandate, vision and core functions.
sunset program (programme temporisé)
A time‑limited program that does not have an ongoing funding and policy authority. When the program is set to expire, a decision must be made whether to continue the program. In the case of a renewal, the decision specifies the scope, funding level and duration.
target (cible)
A measurable performance or success level that an organization, program or initiative plans to achieve within a specified time period. Targets can be either quantitative or qualitative.
voted expenditures (dépenses votées)
Expenditures that Parliament approves annually through an Appropriation Act. The Vote wording becomes the governing conditions under which these expenditures may be made.

Endnotes

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