Action Plan 2010-2015 for Canada's Cyber Security Strategy

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ISBN: 978-1-100-21895-3

Introduction

Information technology is highly integrated into our everyday lives. As a society, we have gone digital.  We play, learn, socialize, communicate, and do business online. While cyberspace brings significant benefits, our ever increasing reliance on it is creating new and significant vulnerabilities.

In line with the Government of Canada's (the Government) commitment to keep the nation safe, secure, and prosperous, we launched Canada's Cyber Security Strategy (the Strategy) on October 3, 2010. The Strategy is designed to guide the Government's efforts to make cyberspace more secure for all Canadians.

The Strategy is composed of three pillars:

This document, the Action Plan 2010-2015 for Canada's Cyber Security Strategy (the Action Plan), outlines the Government's plan to implement the Strategy and meet our ultimate goal of securing our cyberspace for the benefit of Canadians and our economy. Substantial progress has been made to date with respect to the implementation of the Strategy.  The Government has already completed many activities, for example:

The Action Plan demonstrates the Government's commitment to meet cyber threats head-on, with specific targeted actions aimed at producing significant, tangible results.

The Government continues to work with its partners in the provinces and territories, in the private sector, and internationally, in order to improve our collective cyber security. Cyber security is an issue of national importance for which, given the interconnected nature of our systems and networks, we have a shared responsibility and accountability.

Improving Governance

Many Departments and Agencies worked together to develop the Strategy. As the Government works with key partners to implement the Strategy, it needs to ensure that departments and agencies are working together effectively and efficiently to improve cyber security in Canada. Implicated departments include:

Improve Governance
Action Timeline Deliverable Status Lead
Provide leadership and coordination across Government in order to focus cyber security programs and resources. Start: 2010 Introduce Canada's Cyber Security Strategy. Completed Public Safety Canada
Implement Canada's Cyber Security Strategy. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Develop better governance within Government on cyber security. Start: 2010 Establish interdepartmental governance mechanisms on Cyber Security. Completed Public Safety Canada
Support these interdepartmental governance mechanisms. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Start: 2011 Establish a Government of Canada Security Governance Structure, consisting of a Lead Security Agency Steering Committee and a variety of working groups. Completed Treasury Board Secretariat
Support the Government of Canada Security Governance Structure. Ongoing Treasury Board Secretariat
Improve collaboration within federal legal community on cyber security. Start: 2011 Establish and operate a Justice Practice Group on Cyber Security. Ongoing Justice Canada
Provide the Government with timely and relevant metrics to measure the effectiveness of the efforts under Canada's Cyber Security Strategy. Start: 2012 Develop a Horizontal Performance Measurement Strategy. Completed Public Safety Canada
Evaluate Canada's Cyber Security Strategy. On track to begin in 2015 Public Safety Canada

Pillar 1 – Securing Government systems

The Government is entrusted with safeguarding personal and business information in its electronic databases.  It provides services to Canadians and the private sector through its websites and electronic processing systems, and transmits highly classified information that is essential to our military and to our national security operations.

Cyber incidents are directed at a range of computer networks, including Government systems, and those responsible for cyber incidents regularly probe these systems for vulnerabilities. Effectively securing these systems, and the data within them, is therefore a matter of national security and sovereignty.

The safekeeping of Canadians' personal information online, as well as the information technology infrastructure of the Government, is a priority. Measures have been put in place to provide secure online access to Canadians as the Government delivers more services. In addition, the Government is also consolidating its information technology infrastructure to further enhance its security.

The Government is working to strengthen its capability to detect, deter, and defend against cyber incidents while deploying cyber technology to advance Canada's economic and national security interests.  

Secure Government Systems
Action Timeline Deliverable Status Lead
Consolidate the Government's information technology security architecture, in order to improve the security of Government networks. Start: 2011 Create Shared Services Canada to consolidate the Government's digital backbone. Completed Public Works and Government Services Canada
    Develop and implement of new security standards for the procurement of information technology products and services for the Government. Completed Shared Services Canada, Public Works and Government Services Canada, and Communications Security Establishment Canada
Establish a mechanism to prevent and address sophisticated incidents on Government networks. Start: 2011 Establish and operate the Cyber Threat Evaluation Centre at Communications Security Establishment Canada. Fully operational Communications Security Establishment Canada
Invest to reinforce the Government's cyber security capabilities. Start: 2011 Invest $155 million over four years to hire new staff, and invest in better equipment. On track for winter 2016 Various departments
Start: 2012 Develop enterprise IT security architecture designs to ensure basic security building blocks are instilled as Government IT infrastructure is renewed. Ongoing Treasury Board Secretariat (in collaboration with Shared Services Canada and Communications Security Establishment Canada)
Start: 2012 Deliver a new Government-wide IT security incident recovery capability to ensure timely response to and recovery from compromise. Ongoing Treasury Board Secretariat, Shared Services Canada, Communications Security Establishment Canada
Start: 2012 Increase capacity to collect and analyze intelligence. Ongoing Communications Security Establishment Canada
Start: 2012 Improve capacity to detect and defend against cyber threats. Ongoing Communications Security Establishment Canada
Strengthen military aspects of cyber security. Start: 2010 Strengthen capacity to defend Department of National Defence/Canadian Forces networks. Ongoing Department of National Defence/Canadian Forces
Establish a Canadian Forces Cyber Task Force and Director General Cyber organization. Completed Department of National Defence/Canadian Forces
Exchange information about cyber best practices with allied militaries. Ongoing Department of National Defence/Canadian Forces
Improve the Government's plan to respond effectively to a major cyber incident. Start: 2009 Revise the Government's Information Technology Incident Management Plan. Completed Treasury Board Secretariat
Improve security training and awareness throughout the Government's security community. Start: 2010 Lead and facilitate a variety of Government security community events, forums and training related initiatives. Ongoing Treasury Board Secretariat

Pillar 2 – Partnering to secure vital cyber systems outside the federal Government

Canada's security and economic prosperity depend on the smooth functioning of systems outside the Government. Canada's private sector operates many of the systems, and is the custodian of sensitive information and industrial control systems, on which Canada's national security and public safety depend.       

In addition, the ongoing success of Canada's private sector relies in large measure on its ability to commercialize innovative research and intellectual property, business transactions, and financial data. Failing to secure this vital digital information, and the systems that hold it, inevitably leads to lost market share, fewer customers and corporate breakdown for the companies involved.  On a national scale, the theft of trade secrets, intellectual property and confidential corporate information can result in lost jobs and diminished economic prosperity for Canada and Canadians.

Many of the risks and impacts of cyber incidents are shared between governments and the private sector.  Fortunately, Canada's public and private sectors share a long history of working together to achieve shared economic and national security objectives.  This cooperation needs to be further strengthened.

Strengthened partnerships among all levels of Government are also essential in order to deliver a comprehensive cyber security strategy for Canada and Canadians.  Our provincial and territorial counterparts provide a range of essential services whose delivery is dependent on the safe and secure operation of their cyber systems.

The disruption of critical infrastructure and cyber systems can have direct impacts on businesses and communities around the world.  Incidents on interconnected cyber networks can have cascading effects across industrial sectors and national borders.  At the same time, Canada needs to be active in international fora dealing with critical infrastructure protection and cyber security.

Work With Partners Outside the Government of Canada
Action Timeline Deliverable Status Lead
Develop a new process to coordinate a national response to major cyber incidents. Start: 2012 Develop a Cyber Incident Management Framework. On track for fall 2013 Public Safety Canada
Engage owners and operators of Canada's critical infrastructure, using the mechanisms established under the National Strategy and Action Plan for Critical Infrastructure. Start: 2010 Provide cyber security briefings to all sector networks. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Start: 2013 Develop and implement a strategy to engage CEOs on cyber security. On track for spring 2013 Public Safety Canada
Engage provinces and territories on cyber security, to seek their active engagement in improving the cyber security of their systems and vital systems under their jurisdiction. Start: 2011 Establish the Federal Provincial and Territorial Assistant Deputy Minister Committee on cyber security. Completed Public Safety Canada
Obtain security clearances for, and provide classified briefs to the National Chief Information Officer Sub Committee on Information Protection which includes provinces and municipal representatives. Completed Public Safety Canada
Develop and implement information sharing arrangements and protocols. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Start: 2001 Operate a Federal/Provincial/Territorial Coordinating Committee of Senior Officials Cyber Crime Working Group. Ongoing Justice Canada
Develop a Cyber Security Partnership Program for vital systems outside the Government to provide tangible support to their owners and operators. Start: 2010 Organize workshops across the country to improve awareness and understanding of the threats to industrial control systems. Ongoing Public Safety Canada and Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Establish an Industrial Control System laboratory program and testing environment – the National Energy Infrastructure Test Center. Completed Public Safety Canada, Natural Resources Canada, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and Defence Research and Development Canada
Operate the Industrial Control System laboratory program and testing environment. Ongoing Public Safety Canada, Natural Resources Canada, and Defence Research and Development Canada
Develop and implement a grant and contribution program. On track for spring 2013 Public Safety Canada
Design and implement other program elements, in consultation with owners and operators of vital systems Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Improving the Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre's (CCIRC) Ability to Support Systems Outside the Government of Canada
Increase capacity of CCIRC Start: 2012 Increase the operating hours of CCIRC to 15 hours per day, seven days per week to correlate with business hours coast-to-coast. Completed Public Safety Canada
Start: 2011 Invest in CCIRC's technical capability, through training, analytical systems and processes, automation and technology. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Improve the capabilities of CCIRC, in order to assist owners and operators of vital systems to improve their cyber security posture. Start: 2011 Refine and update CCIRC's mandate to focus on delivering products and services to vital systems outside the Government of Canada. Completed Public Safety Canada
Update CCIRC's standard procedures and policies to provide a high and consistent level of support to clients, in light of expanding operations. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Launch CCIRC's Community Portal within the Critical Infrastructure Gateway. Completed Public Safety Canada
Operate CCIRC's Community Portal. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Establish personnel exchange between CCIRC and the Communications Security Establishment Canada. Completed Public Safety Canada and Communications Security Establishment Canada
Commission significant test facilities to improve CCIRC's ability to perform technical research and analysis. Completed Public Safety Canada
Identify and assess gaps in policy with respect to cyber security in Canada. Start: 2011 Provide advice to Government. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Promote Research and Development
Support cyber security research and development activities in order to enhance the technical tools to improve cyber security. Start: 2011 Provide funding to the innovation system, including academic institutions, to develop new technological solutions for cyber security. Ongoing Defence Research and Development Canada
Develop an academic engagement program for cyber security, to promote the development of a strong and cohesive academic community in the social sciences dimension of cyber security. Start: 2012 Host an academic workshop on Critical Infrastructure and Cyber Security issues. Completed Public Safety Canada
Commission research papers on cyber security. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Engage the International Community
Develop a Canada-U.S. Action Plan on cyber security that will bolster Canadian capabilities and improve the cyber security of our shared infrastructure. Start: 2012 Develop the Canada-U.S. Action Plan on Cyber Security, under the Beyond the Border Action Plan. Completed Public Safety Canada
Implement the Canada-U.S. Action Plan on Cyber Security. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Work with close allies and partners to promote Canada's interest in a cyberspace that is open, interoperable, secure, and reliable. Start: 2010 Permanently assign diplomatic personnel for Canada in the United Nations offices in Geneva to deal specifically with cyber security issues. Completed Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
Position Canada as one of the 15 nations working to prepare a major United Nations study for the Secretary of the United Nations. Completed Public Safety Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, and Department of National Defence/ Canadian Forces
Undertake regular policy and operational collaboration internationally. Ongoing Public Safety Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and Department of National Defence/ Canadian Forces
Work with international organizations and foreign Governments to improve their cyber security capabilities, thereby improving Canada's ability to keep our shared infrastructure safe. Start: 2012 Undertake capacity building with a number of regional partners including the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Regional Forum and the Organization of American States (OAS). Ongoing Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade and Public Safety Canada
Host an OAS workshop to share best practices on the development of national cyber security strategies. Completed Public Safety Canada
Develop a framework to ensure that activities in cyberspace are aligned with broader foreign policy, international trade and security objectives. Start: 2012 Create a cyber security foreign policy. On track for fall 2013 Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade
Improve Government communication and collaboration on international cyber issues. Start: 2011 Establish and operate the Interdepartmental Working Group on International Cyber Issues. Ongoing Rotating chair between Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, Public Safety Canada, Justice Canada, and Industry Canada
Engage with international partners to study the United Nations' work on cyber crime. Start: 2010 Work on cyber crime study by the United Nations.  Represent Western European and Other Governments as Rapporteur (Justice Canada). Ongoing Justice Canada and Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade

Pillar 3 – Helping Canadians to be secure online

The third pillar of Canada's Cyber Security Strategy focuses on providing Canadians with information to protect themselves and their families online, and on strengthening the ability of law enforcement agencies to combat cyber crime.

Improve Public Awareness
Action Timeline Deliverables Status Lead
Help Canadians to be secure online. Start: 2011 Develop a strategy that includes advertising, partnerships, web, social media, proactive media relations, earned media, parliamentary engagement, exhibits/special events, and internal communications plans. Completed Public Safety Canada
Implement the communication strategy. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Start: 2011 Conduct baseline public opinion research to evaluate Canadians' cyber security awareness, attitudes, and behaviours. Completed Public Safety Canada
Start: 2011 Establish a national public awareness campaign, Get Cyber Safe, with web, social media and media activities with the website, GetCyberSafe.gc.ca as a focal point. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Start: 2011 Build partnerships with other federal organizations, as well as domestic and international stakeholders, to increase the reach, frequency and impact of messaging to target audiences. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Start: 2011 Partner with STOP.THINK.CONNECT.™ (a coalition of private sector companies, non-profit and government organizations, including the Department of Homeland Security, committed to informing the public about how to stay safer online). Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Start: 2012 Conduct secondary analysis of cyber security threat environment to inform public awareness campaign. Ongoing Public Safety Canada
Cyber Crime
Create a Cyber Crime Fusion Centre to advance situational awareness and analysis of cyber crime trends, including new methods for performance measurement and statistical collection. Start: 2011 Establish the Cyber Crime Fusion Centre. Completed Royal Canadian Mounted Police  
Develop the first report by analyzing cyber crime trends and methods. On track for fall 2013 Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Draft a Canadian Cyber Crime Strategy. Start: 2012 Draft a Cyber Crime Strategy to deal with all aspects of cyber criminality, including fraud, organized crime and identity theft. Ongoing Royal Canadian Mounted Police
Improve the legislative tools to better protect Canadians in cyberspace Start: 2010 Bill C-28, Canada's Anti-spam legislation. Ongoing (Royal Assent received but Act not yet in force) Industry Canada
Start: 2011 Bill C-12, Safeguarding Canadian's Personal Information Act, which includes data breach notification requirements for organizations. Ongoing (awaiting Second Reading) Industry Canada

Conclusion

Cyber security is a shared responsibility, and requires close partnership between the federal Government, the private sector, other levels of government, international partners, and Canadians to ensure that vital cyber systems are secure, and that Canadians can go online with confidence. The Strategy and the Action Plan reflect this shared responsibility. Going forward, to ensure continued progress, this Action Plan will be reviewed and updated periodically in collaboration with partners within and outside the federal government.

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