Canadian Policing Research Catalogue

RCMP use of the Conducted Energy Weapon (CEW) : interim report including recommendations for immediate implementation.

This page has been archived on the Web

Information identified as archived is provided for reference, research or recordkeeping purposes. It is not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards and has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Please contact us to request a format other than those available.

Location

Canadian Policing Research Catalogue

Resource

e-Books

Alternate Title

Utilisation de l'arme à impulsions (AI) à la GRC : rapport intérimaire comprenant les recommandations à mettre en oeuvre immédiatement.

Authors

Bibliography

Includes bibliographic references.

Description

1 online resource (64 pages)

Note

"December 11, 2007."
Issued also in French under the title: Utilisation de l'arme à impulsions (AI) à la GRC : rapport intérimaire comprenant les recommandations à mettre en oeuvre immédiatement.

Summary

The Conducted Energy Weapon is currently one of several use of force weapons available to law enforcement. As such, the CEW has a role in specific situations that require less than lethal alternatives to reduce the risk of injury or death to both the officer and the individual when use of force is required. In other words, it is an option in cases where lethal force would otherwise have been considered. However, CEW use has expanded to include subduing resistant subjects who do not pose a threat of grievous bodily harm or death and on whom the use of lethal force would not be an option. The question to be addressed then is in what situations are CEWs not appropriate for use. In December, RCMP Public Complaints Commissioner Paul Kennedy tabled an interim report on Taser use by the RCMP and issued 10 recommendations for “immediate implementation.” Of those recommendations, the two most urgent—to reclassify Tasers as “impact weapons” and to curtail the use of Tasers in situations in which the subject displays symptoms of “Excited Delirium”— were not implemented by the RCMP.

Subject

Online Access

Contents

1. Introduction. -- 2. Conducted Energy Weapon. -- 3. Commission CEW Related Complaints. -- 4. What is excited delirium. -- 5. Summary of initial literature analysis. -- 6. CEW policy and protocols. -- 7.IM/IM and use of force. -- 8. RCMP training for CEW use. -- 8. Commission's interim recommendations.

Date modified: