Implementation Fact Sheets on Promising and Model Crime Prevention Programs – 2012

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Aggression Replacement Training (ART)®

The ART® program in a nutshell

The Aggression Replacement Training (ART)® program is a 10-week cognitive behavioural multi-component intervention designed to target youths aged 12 to 17 years old who display chronically aggressive and violent behaviour. The program is centered on skill building, group discussions to enhance perspective taking and reinforcement techniques that enhance transfer of learning from the group sessions to the real world.

What are the goals of the ART® program?

The main goals of the ART® program are to reduce aggression and violence among youth by providing them with opportunities to:

Who is the target population for the ART® program?

ART®program is targeted at youths aged 12 to 17 years old serious aggression and anti-social behaviour, and can be applied across several different populations and from different socio-economic backgrounds. It is recommended that potential participants be screened for risk and severity of aggressive/anti-social behaviour before implementation to assess eligibility for inclusion. This type of assessment often includes the use of clinical instruments to examine the degree of problematic behaviour in youths.

What types of settings are appropriate to implement the ART® program?

The ART® program can be implemented in rural, urban, and suburban community settings. In addition to being implemented in schools, ART® has been used in juvenile delinquency programs and in mental health settings to reduce aggressive and anti-social behaviour and promote anger management and social competence. It can also be used by community-based agencies, and most social services programs and services.

What are the key components for the implementation of the ART® program?

The ART® program consists of three interrelated components, all of which come together to promote a comprehensive aggression-reduction curriculum. Each component focuses on a specific pro-social behavioural technique (action, affective/emotional, or thought/values):

What are critical elements for the implementation of the ART® program?

Some of the critical elements for the implementation of the ART® program include:

What are some of the risk factors targeted by the ART® program?

Some of the risk factors targeted by the ART® program are:

What are some of the protective factors targeted by the ART® program?

Some of the protective factors targeted by the ART® program are:

What are the results from evaluation studies of the ART® program?

Evaluation studies of the ART® program have shown the following:

What are the materials needed for the implementation of the ART® program?

The ART® program is an action-oriented, multimodal intervention that uses specific strategies to address those contributors that cause aggressive and violent behaviours in at-risk youth. G & G Consultants, LLC is responsible for product development as well as overseeing the standards and practices for accreditation, and is also the organization responsible for delivering training and managing requests for basic materials needed for this program. These basic materials include 2 manuals:

What staff is needed to implement the ART® program?

The following staffing requirements must be met to implement the ART® program:

What training is needed for staff in implementing the ART® program?

It is highly recommended that group facilitators be trained according to the standards set by trademark certifications and those established by Dr. Barry Glick and G & G Consultants, LLC. They provide training at 3 levels: the basic level qualifies staff to implement ART®, the advanced level qualifies them to train others in the program and during the master's level, program staff learn different things depending on their individual needs. The following is a more detailed explanation of the different training phases:

What are the estimated costs for the ART® program?

Materials and Training

Overall Costs for Implementation

What is the cost-benefit of the ART® program?

If implemented correctly, the ART® program is cost effective. Based on a cost-benefit analysis, this program could generate approximately $11.66 USD in benefits from avoided crime costs for every $1 USD spent on implementing the program.

What other programs have been developed based on the ART® program?

The ART® program has been implemented in schools and juvenile delinquency programs across the United States and throughout the world. The ART® monograph presents suggested program procedures and is available in various foreign languages (e.g., Italian, Swedish, Polish, and Spanish). Some materials are also available in French.

Beyond this, the National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC) is currently not aware of any other program that has been developed based on the ART® program.

Who is the contact for the ART® program?

For more information on this program, please contact:

Barry Glick, PhD
G & G Consultants, LLC
106 Acorn Drive, Suite A
Glenville, New York 12302-4702
Telephone: (518) 399-7933
E-mail: artgang01@gmail.com
Website: http://g-gconsultants.org

Functional Family Therapy (FFT)

The FFT program in a nutshell

The Functional Family Therapy (FFT) program is a multistep, phasic intervention that targets youths 11 to 18 years old who are at risk of or already demonstrating delinquency, violence, substance use, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, or disruptive behaviour disorder. The program includes 8 to 30 hours of direct services for youths and their families, depending upon individual needs. Generally, sessions are spread over a 3-month period of time. The phases of the intervention include engagement (to reduce the risk of early dropout), motivation (to change maladaptive beliefs and behaviours), assessment (to clarify interpersonal behaviour and relationships), behaviour change (including skills training for youths and parents), and generalization (in which individualized casework is used to ensure that new skills are applied to functional family needs).

What are the goals of the FFT program?

The FFT program has several main goals including to:

Who is the target population for the FFT program?

The FFT program targets youth aged 11 to 18 years old who are at risk for or are engaging in delinquent acts, violence, substance use, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, or disruptive behaviour disorder. Often the youth targeted also suffer from additional challenges such as depression. Many youth targeted by the program are at risk for institutionalization if their behaviour does not change.

This program has been applied with success in different ethnic groups under different socio-economic contexts and for different problems (drug consumption, delinquency, and violence). FFT has been shown to be effective when targeting African American and Hispanic youth as well as females. Additionally, the program has been applied to two-parent families as well as single parent families.

What types of settings are appropriate to implement the FFT program?

FFT is an intervention style program with implementation usually occurring in the homes of the clients. However, the FFT model has been successfully replicated across the continuum of juvenile justice, mental health settings, child welfare systems, from prevention and diversion type programs to aftercare and parole, as well as traditional drug and alcohol and school-based programs. As such, the service may also be delivered in clinics, schools, juvenile courts, community-based programs, and at the time of re-entry from institutional placement.

What are the key components for the implementation of the FFT program?

The FFT program has several key steps which are designed to build upon one another to enhance protective factors to reduce risk. These phases consist of:

What are critical elements for the implementation of the FFT program?

Some of the critical elements for the implementation of the FFT program include:

What are some of the risk factors targeted by the FFT program?

Some of the risk factors targeted by the FFT program are:

What are some of the protective factors targeted by the FFT program?

Some of the protective factors targeted by the FFT program are:

What are the results from evaluation studies of the FFT program?

Evaluation studies of the FFT program have shown the following:

What are the materials needed for the implementation of the FFT program?

To address the key issue of enhancing treatment competence, the FFT program recently developed and implemented a sophisticated web-based application designed to monitor highly structured FFT therapist progress notes, as well as supervisor and client ratings of therapist competence.

To support implementation, FFT has well-developed treatment/training and supervision manuals. FFT also has extensive procedures for training sites during set-up and monitoring aspects of sites during implementation, including well-developed systems for training on-site supervisors and booster trainings. A brief description of these training materials is provided:

What staff is needed to implement the FFT program?

The following staffing requirements must be met to implement the FFT program:

What training is needed for staff in implementing the FFT program?

Therapists implementing FFT must be trained in all aspects of the program. There are 3 phases of training that occur over a 3 year period:

What are the estimated costs for the FFT program?

Materials and Training

Overall Costs for Implementation

What is the cost-benefit of the FFT program?

The FFT program has been described as cost-effective. Based on "The Family Project", a replication of the FFT program in Las Vegas (2000), FFT costs during this time were between $700 USD (clinic-based FFT, 12 sessions) and $1,000 USD (in-home FFT, 12 sessions) per family. By contrast, the average cost of detention was at least $6,000 USD per youth for 30 days and the average cost of residential treatment was at least $13,500 USD per youth for 90 days.

What other programs have been developed based on the FFT program?

The FFT program has been replicated in a number of different settings including within a military community, within a youth outreach centre, in a youth services agency, in family preservation programs, and with youth who are substance abusers. Further, in the United States there are numerous adaptations of the traditional FFT model; as a case management practice for juvenile probation and parole officers, as a comprehensive child welfare intervention, and as part of a continuum of evidence-based programs within juvenile justice.

Beyond this, the National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC) is currently not aware of any other program that has been developed based on the FFT program.

Who is the contact for the FFT program?

For more information on this program, please contact:

Holly deMaranville
Communications Coordinator
Functional Family Therapy
1251 NW Elford Drive
Seattle, Washington 98177
Telephone: (206) 369-5894
Fax: (206) 453-3631
E-mail: hollyfft@comcast.net
Website: www.fftinc.com

Leadership and Resiliency Program (LRP)

The LRP in a nutshell

The Leadership and Resiliency Program (LRP) is a school- and community-based program for students aged 14 to 19 years old that enhances youths' internal strengths and resiliency while preventing involvement in substance use and violence. Based on a clinical prevention strategy designed to identify and enhance internal strengths and support the building of positive attitudes, the LRP has three core components: resiliency groups, community/service learning and alternative/adventure activities.

What are the goals of the LRP?

The LRP's main goals are to enhance youths' internal strengths and resiliency and promote mental wellness while preventing involvement in substance use and violence. The program has several objectives including to:

Who is the target population for the LRP?

The LRP is primarily designed for youth of both genders aged 14 to 19 years old. The program has been found to be effective with participants of diverse cultural and ethnic backgrounds. While there are no specific interventions for parents, communication occurs on an ongoing basis between staff and parents. Parents are also encouraged to become involved in the alternative activities.

What types of settings are appropriate to implement the LRP?

The LRP is delivered in the school and/or community setting (rural, urban and/or suburban communities).

What are the key components for the implementation of the LRP?

The LRP has three core components:

Each program component complements the others, and all are considered integral to providing a holistic prevention program. These components and their related activities were chosen specifically for the target population and are developmentally-appropriate. A focus of each component is building leadership and problem-solving skills among the participants while encouraging the development of peer refusal skills, risk management, goal orientation, future-oriented thinking, optimism, empathy, internal locus of control, and conflict management.

What are critical elements for the implementation of the LRP?

Some critical elements for organizations implementing the LRP include a requirement to:

Other important considerations:

What are some of the risk factors targeted by the LRP?

Some of the risk factors targeted by the LRP are:

What are some of the protective factors targeted by the LRP?

Some of the protective factors targeted by the LRP are:

What are the results from the evaluation studies of the LRP?

Evaluation studies of the LRP have shown the following:

What are the materials needed for the implementation of the LRP?

For each component of the LRP, there is a curriculum that provides a program description, specific descriptions of several group activities, sample forms and releases, required supplies and replication tips. Organizations must purchase the training manuals to obtain the contents of the curricula. For a suggested preliminary list of materials, contact the developer. Other materials and required resources are identified during the training and in the LRP manual.

What staff is needed to implement the LRP?

The following staffing requirements must be met to implement the LRP program:

What training is needed for staff in implementing the LRP?

All staff members working with the youth are required to attend a mandatory 2-1/2 day training session provided by the program developer.

What are the estimated costs for the LRP?

Materials

Training

Overall Costs for Implementation

What is the cost-benefit of the LRP?

The National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC) is currently not aware of any study that has been conducted on the cost-benefit of the LRP.

What other programs have been developed based on the LRP?

The National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC) is currently not aware of any other program that has been developed based on the LRP.

Who is the contact for the LRP?

For more information on this program, please contact:

Jamie MacDonald
Director of Prevention Programs, Alcohol and Drug Services
Fairfax-Falls Church Community Services Board
3900 Jermantown Road, Suite 200
Fairfax, Virginia 22030-4900
Telephone: (703) 934-8770
Fax: (703) 934-8742
E-mail: Jamie.MacDonald@fairfaxcounty.gov
Website: http://www.fairfaxcounty.gov/csb/services/leadership-resiliency/overview.htm

Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT)

The MDFT program in a nutshell

The Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT) program is a comprehensive, manual-driven and multi-systemic family-based program for substance-abusing youths, youths with co-occurring substance use and mental disorders, and those at high risk for continued substance abuse and other problem behaviours such as conduct disorder and delinquency.

Working with the individual youth and his or her family, MDFT helps the youth develop more effective coping and problem-solving skills for better decision making and helps the family improve interpersonal functioning as a protective factor against substance abuse and related problems. Therapists work simultaneously in four interdependent domains: adolescent, parent, family, and community. Once a therapeutic alliance is established and youth and parent motivation is enhanced, the MDFT therapist focuses on facilitating behavioural and interactional change.

What are the goals of the MDFT program?

The MDFT program focuses on achieving behavioural changes in youths such that they are on a safe and healthy development trajectory. The specific areas of change that MDFT focuses on are: substance use, criminal behaviour, school/vocational bonding and success, youth self-efficacy, and family relations. In order to achieve these gains and to make them last, MDFT attempts to improve:

Who is the target population for the MDFT program?

The MDFT program targets youth aged 11 to 18 years old with the following symptoms or problems: substance abuse or at risk, delinquent/conduct disorder, school behavioural problems, and both internalizing and externalizing symptoms. MDFT has been used with youth from diverse ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds; in urban, suburban, and rural settings; and in a variety of contexts.

The MDFT program has general inclusion and exclusion guidelines for youth's participation.Note 3 To be included in the program, a youth must be within the designated age range and must demonstrate at least one of the following primary presenting problems: cannabis abuse or dependence; alcohol abuse or dependence; other substance abuse; oppositional defiant disorder, and conduct disorder. Also, if the youth meets any of the following criteria, they are not appropriate for MDFT: no parent or functional parent able to participate in treatment program; youth living independently or apart from parent such that family sessions and interactions would be infrequent; concurrent mental health or substance abuse treatment other than medication management; current heroin use, abuse, or dependence; actively homicidal; actively suicidal, or has had a suicide attempt within the last 12 months; psychotic disorders or features; eating disorders, bi-polar disorders, pervasive development disorders; other mental health disorders that require chronic care; or significant violence or threat of violence in the home such that it is unsafe for youth or other family members for youth to reside in the home.

What types of settings are appropriate to implement the MDFT program?

The MDFT program is typically delivered in the home environment (birth family, adoptive, and/or foster home), community-based setting (community agency, day treatment program), hospital and/or residential care facility, school setting.

What are the key components for the implementation of the MDFT program?

A manual-driven intervention, the MDFT program has specific assessment and treatment modules that target four areas of social interaction: (1) the youth's intrapersonal (e.g., self-efficacy, emotion regulation, decision-making) and interpersonal functioning (i.e., with parents and peers) (2) the parents' parenting practices and level of adult functioning independent of their parenting role, (3) parent-adolescent bonding and relationships, communication and problem solving, and (4) communication between family members and key social systems (e.g., school, child welfare, mental health, juvenile justice).

The MDFT program is administered in three stages:

For at-risk and early intervention with youth, the MDFT program is delivered weekly or twice weekly in 45- to 90-minute sessions with a therapist for the duration of 3-4 months. More severe cases (youth with a substance abuse and/or conduct) may require 2-3 sessions per week (average of 2) with each session lasting 60-90 minutes for the duration of 4-6 months. Youth who are receiving MDFT as an alternative to residential placement usually require 6 months of treatment.

What are critical elements for the implementation of the MDFT program?

Some critical elements for implementing the MDFT program include:

Other important considerations:

What are some of the risk factors targeted by the MDFT program?

Some of the risk factors targeted by the MDFT program are:

What are some of the protective factors targeted by the MDFT program?

Some of the protective factors targeted by the MDFT program are:

What are the results from evaluation studies of the MDFT program?

Evaluation studies of the MDFT program have shown the following:

What are the materials needed for the implementation of the MDFT program?

There are numerous written and recorded (DVD) training materials that are provided to trainees at the start of training. These include:

What staff is needed to implement the MDFT program?

The following staffing requirements must be met to implement the MDFT program:

What training is needed for staff in implementing the MDFT program?

MDFT International, a non-profit organization, provides training. MDFT requires training to certification for therapists and supervisors, and all supervisors must be trained as therapists as well as supervisors.

The initial therapist and supervisor training takes approximately 1 year to complete. All training is provided on-site or via phone or internet. Trainees do not need to travel to complete the training. Therapist training for full certification takes approximately 6 months to complete, and then supervisor training takes an additional 5-6 months. The training includes 4-5 on-site intensive trainings, weekly telephone consultations, weekly written feedback on MDFT forms, access to the online program, review of recordings (DVD/video) of therapist's work, fidelity ratings, and written examinations. Supervisor training includes 1-2 on-site intensive trainings, training in the MDFT therapist professional development plan including written feedback, 4-5 consultation telephone calls, review of 2-4 DVD recordings of supervision sessions for feedback and evaluation of supervision competence.

Yearly booster training is required after the initial certification year to maintain and enhance clinical skills and fidelity to MDFT.

What are the estimated costs for the MDFT program?

Materials and Training

Overall Costs for Implementation

The overall cost for implementation will vary depending on the size of the program and the local context within which the program is being implemented. Additional expenses such as program support, length of program, quality assurance materials, travel and accommodations, participation incentives (food, child care, transportation), completion incentives, etc., should also be considered in implementation estimates.

What is the cost-benefit of the MDFT program?

Average weekly costs of treatment are significantly less for MDFT ($164 USD) than community-based outpatient treatment ($365 USD). An intensive version of MDFT designed as an alternative to residential treatment provides superior clinical outcomes at one-third the cost (average weekly costs of $384 USD versus $1,068 USD).

What other programs have been developed based on the MDFT program?

To date in the United States, MDFT has been used in over 40 sites in 11 states. Some of the sites have been operating MDFT for over a decade. There is one MDFT program in Canada at Hull Child and Family Services in Calgary. This program has been operating for over 3 years. Internationally, MDFT has been implemented in several European countries, including Belgium, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and Switzerland as part of the five-country collaborative treatment study known as INCANT (International Cannabis Need of Treatment Project). MDFT was also implemented at four sites in Glasgow (Scotland) in a dissemination study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). Treatment manuals, protocols, and guides are available in English, Dutch, French and German.

MDFT also offers a MDFT for STD/HIV prevention and intervention that can be integrated into the standard MDFT. The MDFT STD/HIV prevention component is conducted in a structured, interactive multiple family group format. MDFT can be provided with or without the STD/HIV prevention module.

MDFT is a "treatment system" rather than a "one size fits all" approach. Different versions of MDFT have been developed and tested according to study aims, client needs, and treatment setting characteristics.

Who is the contact for the MDFT program?

For more information on this program, please contact:

Gayle A. Dakof, PhD
MDFT International, Inc.
1425 NW 10th Avenue, 2nd floor
Miami, Florida 33136
Telephone: (305) 243-3656
Fax: (305) 243-3651
E-mail: gdakof@med.miami.edu
Website: www.med.miami.edu/ctrada/x14.xml

Multisystemic Therapy (MST)

The MST program in a nutshell

The Multisystemic Therapy (MST) program is an intensive family-and community-based treatment intervention that focuses on working with families in the settings in which the problem behaviours occur (e.g., home, school, community) rather than with individual youth in detention centres or other residential settings outside of their own families. A treatment plan is designed in collaboration with family members and is, therefore, family driven rather than therapist driven. Over an average of 4 months, MST is intensively involved with the target family, in order to build a network of support that is enduring, realistic and able to sustain the changes made during the program.

What are the goals of the MST program?

The main goals of the MST program are to:

Who is the target population for the MST program?

The MST program is most likely to be implemented with youths who have serious clinical problems. The target population are usually youth, aged 12 to 17 years old, at risk of out-of-home placement due to anti-social or delinquent behaviours and/or youth involved with the juvenile justice system.

Inappropriate referrals to the MST program include youth referred for primarily psychiatric behaviours (i.e., actively suicidal, actively homicidal, actively psychotic), youth referred primarily for sex offences (in the absence of other anti-social/delinquent behaviors) and youth with pervasive developmental delays.

What types of settings are appropriate to implement the MST program?

In general, local mental health settings or other provider organizations that deliver mental health services provide the home for most MST programs. In addition to being familiar with the kind of therapy MST utilizes and agreeing to hiring the type of therapists MST requires, the infrastructure of these agencies routinely include processes such as a case record keeping system, staff knowledgeable about issues such as confidentiality, and relations with formal community resources that support the provision of community-based mental health services.

What are the key components for the implementation of the MST program?

Each MST therapist is assigned 4-6 families at a time. They are trained to assess the family relationships and functioning, the peer environment, the school environment and the neighbourhood as well as the individual who is involved or at risk of being involved with the criminal justice system. A plan is developed based on these assessments that target the drivers of the referral behaviours, and generally the family is at the centre of these targeted interventions. They receive supports and evidence-based therapeutic services based on what will work best to reach their goals. Specific treatment techniques used to facilitate the gains are integrated from those therapies that have the most empirical support, including cognitive behavioural, behavioural and the pragmatic family therapies.

The MST program has 9 different principles which serve as the core program elements. These principles are:

What are critical elements for the implementation of the MST program?

Some of the critical elements for the implementation of the MST program include:

What are some of the risk factors targeted by the MST program?

Some of the risk factors targeted by the MST program are:

What are some of the protective factors targeted by the MST program?

Some of the protective factors targeted by the MST program are:

What are the results from evaluation studies of the MST program?

Evaluation studies of the MST program have shown the following:

What are the materials needed for the implementation of the MST program?

The two treatment manuals (anti-social behaviour and serious emotional disturbance) are available for purchase from Guilford Press. All other MST materials: manuals, books, posters, MST Organizational Manual, MST Supervisory Manual, MST Training handouts, etc. are provided to MST sites. Sites are licensed through MST Services Inc., which has the exclusive license for the transport of MST technology and intellectual property through the Medical University of South Carolina.

What staff is needed to implement the MST program?

The following staffing requirements must be met to implement the MST program:

What training is needed for staff in implementing the MST program?

MST Services is at the centre of efforts to disseminate/replicate the MST approach. Their mission is to provide high quality, highly responsive training and consultation services to organizations seeking to deliver home-based services using MST to target populations with which MST has been shown to be effective. The people delivering the training and consultation are doctoral and master's level experts in MST.

The MST program start-up, support, and training program has been developed to replicate the characteristics of training, clinical supervision, consultation, monitoring and program support provided in the successful clinical trials of MST. The core MST clinical training package consists of:

What are the estimated costs for the MST program?

Materials and Training

Overall Costs for Implementation

What is the cost-benefit of the MST program?

Return on investment studies for the MST program demonstrate that for every $1 USD spent on the MST program a return of $12.40 to $38.52 USD to tax payers and crime victims can be expected in the years ahead.

What other programs have been developed based on the MST program?

As the MST program's effectiveness for treating chronic juvenile offenders became known, pilot studies were set up to explore the feasibility of treating other target populations. These are called MST adaptations. There are currently 13 adaptations being studied with 4 in the later stages of development and implementation: child abuse and neglect, psychiatric, substance abuse, and problem sexual behaviour.

Beyond these adaptations, the National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC) is currently not aware of any other program that has been developed based on the MST program.

Who is the contact for the MST program?

For more information on this program, please contact:

Melanie Duncan
MST Services
710 J. Dodds Boulevard, Suite 200
Mount Pleasant, South Carolina 29464
Telephone: (843) 856-8226
Fax: (843) 856-8227
E-mail: melanie.duncan@mstservices.com
Website: www.mstservices.com

For information on program development, please contact:

Marshall E. Swenson
Manager of Program Development
MST Services
710 J. Dodds Boulevard, Suite 200
Mount Pleasant, South Carolina 29464
Telephone: (843) 284-2215
Fax: (843) 856-8227
E-mail: marshall.swenson@mstservices.com
Website: www.mstservices.com, www.mstinstitute.org, and www.mstjobs.com

Project Venture

The Project Venture program in a nutshell

The Project Venture program is an outdoor experiential youth development intervention developed by the National Indian Youth Leadership Project (NIYLP) that has proven to be extremely effective in preventing substance abuse by Aboriginal youth.  Based on traditional Aboriginal values such as family, learning from the natural world, spiritual awareness, service to others, and respect, Project Venture's approach is positive and strengths based. It seeks to reduce negative attitudes/behaviours by helping youth develop a positive self-concept, effective social interaction skills, a community service ethic, an internal locus of control, and decision making/problem-solving skills. The central components of the program include classroom-based activities conducted across the school year; weekly after-school, weekend, and summer skill-building experiential and challenge activities; immersion summer adventure camps and wilderness treks; and community-oriented service learning and service leadership projects throughout the year.

What are the goals of the Project Venture program?

The main goals of the Project Venture program are to:

Who is the target population for the Project Venture program?

The target population for the Project Venture program is Aboriginal youth in grades 5 through 9. However, this program can be applied to other ethnicities, and has in the past been applied to youth in grades 4 through 12. Youth who could benefit from a positive youth development experience/process are identified, by teachers, counselors, social workers, etc.

What types of settings are appropriate to implement the Project Venture program?

The Project Venture program is delivered in the school and/or community settings. Although it was initially designed for Aboriginal communities (on reserve) it has since been adapted so that it can be implemented in urban, suburban and rural schools and communities. Given that the in-school component is key to the success of Project Venture, there must be a strong partnership with the local school boards.

What are the key components for the implementation of the Project Venture program?

The Project Venture program uses 4 different components:

Classroom-Based Activities:

Outdoor Activities:

Adventure Camps and Treks:

Community-Oriented Service Learning:

What are critical elements for the implementation of the Project Venture program?

Some of the critical elements for implementing the Project Venture program include:

Further, NIYLP has developed a list of requirements necessary for the successful implementation of the Project Venture program:

What are some of the risk factors targeted by the Project Venture program?

Some of the risk factors targeted by the Project Venture program are:

What are some of the protective factors targeted by the Project Venture program?

Some of the protective factors targeted by the Project Venture program are:

What are the results from evaluation studies of the Project Venture program?

Evaluation studies of the Project Venture program have shown the following:

What are the materials needed for the implementation of the Project Venture program?

The typical resources needed for implementing the Project Venture program include:

It is only through NIYLP that an organization will be able to obtain these materials. NIYLP will also provide information and give guidance on where organizations may find other materials which will assist them in implementing the Project Venture program successfully.

What staff is needed to implement the Project Venture program?

The following staffing requirements must be met to implement the Project Venture program:

What training is needed for staff in implementing the Project Venture program?

It is only through contacting NIYLP, the developers of Project Venture, that an organization will have the tools necessary to successfully implement the program. NIYLP provides all of the training (on and off site) that is necessary for Project Venture. A minimum of 2 days of onsite training, or training at the Annual Project Venture Gathering Workshop, for direct services staff and key support staff and administrative staff is required.

What are the estimated costs for the Project Venture program?

Materials

Training

Overall Costs for Implementation

What is the cost-benefit of the Project Venture program?

The National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC) is currently not aware of any study that has been conducted on the cost-benefit of the Project Venture program.

What other programs have been developed based on the Project Venture program?

Since 1990, the Project Venture program has been implemented in more than 70 sites in more than 23 American states, as well as in Canada and Hungary. Project Venture has been adapted for Native Hawaiian, Alaska Native, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic youth, as well as for youth of mixed ethnicity. The program also has been adapted specifically for female youth.

Connecting to Courage is a Project Venture adaptation that provides services to primarily Hispanic/Latino youth through in-school programming and out-of-school challenge and service activities. Connecting to Courage places high emphasis on parental participation and family involvement; provides comprehensive academic support for participants; and has developed a unique recruiting strategy.

The NIYLP has developed another program that is well along in the process to become evidence-based. Called Therapeutic Adventure for Native American Youth (TANAY), this program is for high risk youth, who might be in juvenile detention, treatment programs, alternative schools, out of school, etc. It has some experiential learning content and service learning, but also has an equine therapy component, a comprehensive staff development component and culturally sensitive mental health services. This program has been implemented in one of the Indian Health Service regional youth treatment centers with good success and recently got a three year grant from a foundation to take TANAY through the rest of the process to become evidence-based.

Additional information on the Project Venture program

Below is a sample budget created by the developers for a typical Project Venture program that has 100 youth in the in-school component and 30 youth in the community-based component, and summer camp and wilderness experiences.

During a first phase of implementation of Project Venture in a Canadian setting by the National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC), the budget was significantly different from that proposed by the developer. Associated personnel, travel, equipment, material and supply costs are higher than those identified by the developer. The projects implemented through NCPC funding have included on average 1 project coordinator and 2 full-time facilitators, as well as increased travel costs associated with the remote locations of financed projects.

Project Venture program Sample Budget
Sample Budget Item Cost (USD)
Personnel $50,000
Travel $7,000
Supplies/incentives $4,000
Equipment $7,000
Evaluation ($10,000)*
Camp $5,000
Facilitator stipends $3,000
Training $3,000
Audit ($1,000)*
Operational $7,000
Other indirect costs ($5,000)*

* The costs in parentheses do not necessarily equate to the National Crime Prevention Centre's reality.

Although the developers estimated $3,000 USD for training in the above sample budget when they break down the costs of training it is evident that training costs could be more than this.

Project Venture program Training Costs
Training Item Cost (USD)
Mandatory pre-start-up meeting $600 per person, + travel/lodging
Consultation for assessment of resources for readiness, programming, sustainability, and evaluation (optional) $1,000 per day + travel/lodging
Mandatory 2-day on-site basic program training (recommended for sites with six or more trainees) $3,000 + travel/lodging
Off-site training at National Indian Youth Leadership Project (one training is required) $1000 per day, per person + travel/lodging
Advanced Project Venture programming workshop (optional) $500 per person
Summer camp training (recommended, not required) $600 per day per person + travel/lodging
10 hours of follow-up consultation via phone or internet (required) $2,000 per year
On-site follow-up consultation, coaching and support (required) $1,000 per day + travel/lodging
Follow-up on site visit upon request $1,500 + travel/lodging
Training from local providers (first aid/CPR, Challenge Course, etc.) To be determined locally

Who is the contact for the Project Venture program?

For more information on this program, please contact:

McClellan Hall
Executive Director
National Indian Youth Leadership Project, Inc.
205 Sunde Street
Gallup, New Mexico 87301
Telephone: (505) 722-9176
Fax: (505) 722-9794
E-mail: machall@niylp.org
Website: http://www.niylp.org/

Susan Carter
Evaluation Coordinator
National Indian Youth Leadership Project, Inc.
205 Sunde Street
Gallup, New Mexico 87301
Telephone: (505) 508-2232
Fax: (505) 722-9794
E-mail: susanleecarter@comcast.net
Website: http://www.niylp.org/

SNAP® Program (Stop Now and Plan)

The SNAP® program in a nutshell

SNAP® (Stop Now and Plan) is an evidence-based, gender sensitive cognitive behavioural multi-component family-focused model developed at the Child Development Institute (CDI), Toronto, Canada more than 25 years ago. The SNAP® model provides a framework for effectively teaching children and their parents self-control and problem-solving skills. The SNAP® model framework has been incorporated into various SNAP® programs based on needs and risks of different populations of children, youth, families, and communities such as the SNAP® Boys (SNAP® Under 12 Outreach Project; aged 6 to 12); SNAP® Girls (SNAP® Girls Connection, aged 6 to 12), SNAP® for Schools (generally elementary school), SNAP® for Youth Outreach Program (aged 12 to 17) and SNAP® for Youth in Custody.

What are the goals of the SNAP® program?

The primary goal of the SNAP® program is to keep at-risk boys and girls in school and out of trouble. The other objectives are to:

Who is the target population for the SNAP® program?

To be eligible to receive services through SNAP®, children/youth must score within clinical levels on the conduct, oppositional and/or externalizing scales as assessed by either standardized measures, adapted checklists or through a clinical assessment. Both boys and girls typically present at admission with one or more of the following problems: aggression towards others in the home and/or at school; lying/stealing; hyperactivity/impulsivity; oppositional behaviour; having trouble keeping friends; vandalism; fire setting; lacking self-control and problem-solving skills and having police contact for their own misbehaviour in one or more settings (e.g. at home, in the community, at school).

What types of settings are appropriate to implement the SNAP® program?

With adequate training and support, this program can be successfully replicated and implemented with strong fidelity in a variety of settings. SNAP® fits in the classroom, in the clinician's office and at home. The program can be situated in a variety of diverse community settings and real life community conditions. Currently, a number of SNAP® implementations are being tested in a variety of settings with promising results, such as SNAP® for Schools, SNAP® for First Nation/Aboriginal Communities, SNAP® for youth in custody, SNAP® Aspergers. It may also be implemented by a wide variety of organizations including children's mental health organizations.

What are the key components for the implementation of the SNAP® program?

The SNAP® program employs a multi-systemic approach, combining interventions that target the child, the family, the school, and the community. The program uses a variety of established interventions that are organized: skills training, training in cognitive problem-solving, self-control strategies, family management skills training, and parent training.

Screening and Assessment

The SNAP® program includes a number of service components available to children and families based on their level of risk and need. These are:

What are critical elements for the implementation of the SNAP® program?

Some of the critical elements for implementing the SNAP® program include:

What are some of the risk factors targeted by the SNAP® program?

Some of the risk factors targeted by the SNAP® program are:

What are some of the protective factors targeted by the SNAP® program?

Some of the protective factors targeted by the SNAP® program are:

What are the results from evaluation studies of the SNAP® program?

Evaluation studies of the SNAP® program have shown the following:

What are the materials needed for the implementation of the SNAP® program?

SNAP® resources and assessment materials are intended for clinicians and professionals experienced in and knowledgeable about working with young girls and boys who have severe behavioural difficulties and their families. SNAP® resource materials are designed to support the delivery of the SNAP® Model, ongoing research activities, and clinical assessments related to childhood delinquency, aggression, bullying and possible gang involvement. These resources have become valuable in education systems, mental health facilities, child care establishments and outreach programs.

Some of these resources are available solely for licensed SNAP® Affiliate Sites (that have undergone training), while other resources are available for parents and professionals wishing to learn more about helping children with disruptive behaviour problems.

Manuals

Assessment Tools

Training DVD

Booklets

What staff is needed to implement the SNAP® program?

The following staffing requirements must be met to implement the SNAP® program. Depending on the number of children to be served and community needs, there can be variations in staffing numbers. Suggested staffing for a pilot SNAP® Boys or SNAP® Girls program includes:

What training is needed for staff in implementing the SNAP® program?

Training modules are available for professionals and organizations interested in delivering services for children with disruptive behaviour problems. Training can be customized by SNAP® trainers to meet the unique needs of organizations. Training modules are available for all needs (English and French): SNAP® replications, SNAP® For Schools, or the EARL risk assessment tools. All training is didactic and interactive. Participants engage in role-plays, group practice exercises, discussions and pen and paper tasks designed to maximize the learning experience. Training can be offered at either CDI or at home sites (typically at the organization requesting the training).

Current training modules available include:

The maximum number of training participants varies from group to group. Given that group practice exercises are a key training component, a minimum number of attendees are required and maximum numbers may be established for optimal learning.

When training is requested by a new SNAP® Affiliate Site, it is advised that key staff of the broader organization attend the day of training in order to gain a solid understanding of the SNAP® Model and the context in which this model came to be. Full participation is mandatory for any staff member who will be delivering the SNAP® model and/or using the risk assessment tools.

Consultation is negotiated with each SNAP® Affiliate Site on an annual and as-needed basis and is customized to meet the individual organization's needs. This can be done through face-to-face meetings, via telephone or video conferencing methods. Clinical teams and supervisors are all invited to be involved in this process which can include reviews of live or videotaped SNAP® sessions. Part of this process involves treatment fidelity and integrity and implementation audits.

What are the estimated costs for the SNAP® program?

Materials

Training

Overall Costs for Implementation

What is the cost-benefit of the SNAP® program?

At this time, a number of SNAP® cost‐benefit analyses are being conducted on the SNAP® Boys and SNAP® Girls (mental health models) by several external researchers.Note 4

One study examining the social return on investment of the SNAP® program found the following ratios: Year 1= 7.55:1; Year 2= 13.08: 1; Year 3= 16.66:1; for a total 3 year average of 12.58:1.Note 5

What other programs have been developed based on the SNAP® program?

SNAP® for Schools

SNAP® for Schools is a whole school approach to keep children in school and out of trouble The current manualized SNAP® for Schools program targets elementary school aged children. It seeks to decrease aggressive, anti-social and bullying behaviour and increase pro-social behaviour in designated elementary and middle schools. As an example, the implementation of SNAP® in high schools has been one component of a broader set of services within the pilot project in Jane/Finch Project (see SNAP® for Youth aged 12 to 17 years below).

A whole school approach to SNAP® means:

In addition to the above, members of designated school personal and/or other (e.g., partnering children's mental health workers) conducting individual SNAP® coaching to designated children.

As part of the whole school approach, designated school personnel (Certified SNAP® Users), in conjunction with the classroom teacher conduct 12 weekly 40 minute SNAP® groups in classrooms of targeted children identified by their teachers as having disruptive behaviour problems. As a follow-up to these sessions the classroom teacher continues to use the SNAP® principles learned along with the newly implemented principles of behaviour change. In addition, the classroom teacher will conduct weekly classroom based SNAP® review sessions (approximately 20 minutes) using the SNAP® manualized instruction process.

Consultation sessions with SNAP® schools will be coordinated between clusters of approximately 5 schools with the designated Certified SNAP® Practitioners and other school personnel as deemed necessary. This will occur twice a year and will include ongoing support, training updates and fidelity checks. Further enhancements of this training process are available from CDI on a fee for service basis include: ongoing coaching, consultation and support on-site and by telephone; assistance with SNAP® special days at school and assemblies; and SNAP® parenting workshops.

SNAP® for Youth Outreach Program (aged 12 to 17 years old)

The Child Development Institute is currently piloting the SNAP® for Youth Outreach Program. This program is currently located in the prioritized neighbourhood of Jane/Finch (Ontario). The program serves youth (12-17) in schools and community agencies who require preventative skills in order to avoid more clinical interventions and/or future police contact. The overall objective of the program is to improve the quality of life chances of at-risk youth, to regularly attend school and stay out of trouble. These outcomes are facilitated through collaborative provision of multifaceted, accessible and effective services for youth exhibiting mild to serious levels of behavioural and anti-social challenges. The main components of the program include the SNAP® for Youth manualized program (currently in final draft), community outreach, individual mentoring, consultation and training.

In 1996, SNAP® became a continued care model and was then able to deliver long-term services. There is a Boy's Youth Club for high-risk boys, over the age of 12, who have completed the SNAP® Boys Group but still require support, which also includes a Leaders-in-Training component that focuses on skill development and employment readiness training. For girls, there are two Leaders-In-Training (I & II) groups that meet weekly throughout the year that also focus on skill development and employment readiness training. (Please note: these services are only available for those children who have been admitted into SNAP® Boys/Girls before the age of 12).

SNAP® for Youth in Custody

SNAP® for Youth in Custody is currently funded by the Department of Justice Canada under the Guns, Gangs and Drugs Initiative. The SNAP® for Youth in Custody project will work in tandem with Ontario's Ministry of Children and Youth Services' Youth Justice Services Division (YJSD) to develop, train, implement and evaluate a dual intervention approach designed to reduce the risk of further conflict with the law and/or gang membership amongst at-risk youth in custody. This is a 3-year project in which this first year is designed for program development with implementation and testing occurring in years 2 and 3.

Additional information on the SNAP® program

Detailed Overview of Estimated SNAP® Implementation Costs (in CDN):
Description Start-Up One-Time Cost Base Ongoing Year 1 Base Ongoing Year 2 Base Ongoing Year 3 Base Ongoing Year 4+
Consultants and Professional Fees
Pre-Implementation Consult $1,200        
SNAP® 2‐day Lead Staff Training (Rate: $2,400/day) $4,800        
Initial SNAP® 5-day, core training @ $2,400/day (onsite) $12,000        
Consultation Fee Structure   $4,800 $4,200 $3,000 $1,000
Annual SNAP® Licensing Fee/Site   $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000
Professional Development / Travel
Fidelity and Integrity checks (on-site one or two times/year, dependent on need) [Cost Breakdown: $1,200/visit + travel/accommodations]   TBD TBD TBD TBD
Operations
Supplies: SNAP® resource materials   $1,000 $1,000 $1,000 $1,000
Capital Cost – (Not included in total): Program Equipment Needs (e.g., video camera, 2 TVs, 2 DVD players, 2 video & audio wall mounted observation equipment, tables/chairs, white/blackboard) TBD        
TOTAL * $18,000 $6,800 $6,200 $5,000 $3,000

*Total (excluding capital cost: equipment estimated at one-time cost of $6,000-$8,000), travel and accommodations (estimated between $2,000-$4,000/year); dependent on location and number of on-site visits required. All of these costs are subject to change by the Institute (CDI).

Who is the contact for the SNAP® program?

For more information on this program, please contact:

Dr. Leena K. Augimeri
Director, Scientific and Program Development & Centre for Children Committing Offences
Child Development Institute
46 St. Clair Gardens,
Toronto, Ontario M6E 3V4
Telephone: (416) 603-1827, extension 3112
Fax: (416) 654-8996
E-mail: laugimeri@childdevelop.ca
Website: www.stopnowandplan.com

For information about how to become an affiliate site, licensing and training, please contact:

Nicola Slater
Manager, Centre for Children Committing Offences
Child Development Institute
46 St. Clair Gardens, Toronto, Ontario M6E 3V4
Telephone: (416) 603-1827, extension 3148
Fax: (416) 654-8996
E-mail: nslater@childdevelop.ca
Website: www.stopnowandplan.com

Strengthening Families Program (SFP)

The SFP in a nutshell

The Strengthening Families Program (SFP) is an internationally recognized evidence-based parenting and family strengthening program for families of all risk levels. SFP has been found to significantly reduce problem behaviours, delinquency, and alcohol and drug abuse in children and youth and to improve social competencies and school performance. Child maltreatment also decreases as parents strengthen bonds with their children and learn more effective parenting skills.

SFP has many versions, including programs for parents and children ages 3-5, 6-11 and 12-16 in higher risk families. SFP consists of parenting skills, children's life skills, and family skills training courses taught together in 2-hour group sessions preceded by a meal that includes informal family practice time and group leader coaching. SFP was designed in 14 sessions to assure sufficient dosage to promote behaviour change in high-risk families. The shorter 7-session SFP 10-14 version for general/universal population families has achieved excellent results for that population with a lower dosage.

As the National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC) prioritizes targeted interventions for at risk youth, only SFP 6-11 and SFP 12-16 are eligible for funding. The present factsheet will focus on these two versions of the program.

What are the goals of the SFP?

The goal of the SFP is to increase family strengths and resilience and reduce risk factors for problem behaviours in high risk children, including behavioural problems, and emotional, academic and social problems. The other main objectives of the SFP are to:

Who is the target population for the SFP?

The target population for the SFP 6-11 and SFP 12-16 programs are high-risk children and youth aged 6 to 16 years old as well as their parents or caregivers; parents/caregivers include biological parents, step- and adoptive parents, foster parents, and grandparents. The SFP 6-11 targets children and youth aged 6 to 11 years old and SPF 12-16 targets youth aged 12 to 16 years old.

What types of settings are appropriate to implement the SFP?

The SFP has been implemented in many different community-based settings, such as schools, drug treatment centers, family or youth services agencies, community mental health centers, housing projects, homeless shelters, churches, recreation centers and drug courts.

What are the key components for the implementation of the SFP?

The SFP consists of child/youth sessions, parent sessions and parent and child practice time in the family sessions to develop positive interactions, communication, and effective discipline:

What are critical elements for the implementation of the SFP?

Some of the critical elements for the implementation of the SFP include:

What are some of the risk factors targeted by the SFP?

Some of the risk factors targeted by the SFP are:

What are some of the protective factors targeted by the SFP?

Some of the protective factors targeted by the SFP are:

What are the results from evaluation studies of the SFP?

Evaluation studies of the SFP have shown the following:

What are the materials needed for the implementation of the SFP?

The typical resources needed for implementing the SFP include 6 books:

The manuals contain full lesson plans, worksheets, activity sheets, experimental activities, and homework for the group leaders to implement during the sessions.

What staff is needed to implement the SFP?

The following staffing requirements must be met to implement the SFP:

What training is needed for staff in implementing the SFP?

Training of SFP group leaders by SFP-certified trainers and technical assistance for implementation, including quality/fidelity assurance and evaluation, are provided by Lutra Group, Inc. SFP group leader trainings comprise both instruction and participation by trainees and include:

What are the estimated costs for the SFP?

Materials

Training

Overall Costs for Implementation

What is the cost-benefit of the SFP?

The National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC) is currently not aware of any study that has been conducted on the cost-benefit of the SFP.

What other programs have been developed based on the SFP?

In the United States, approximately 50 SFP trainings are conducted each year for more than 450 agencies and 1,000 new group leaders, as such it is difficult to know about all the new populations to which SFP is being applied. The following represents only a sample of new SFP target populations:

Beyond this, the National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC) is currently not aware of any other program that has been developed based on the SFP program.

Additional information on the SFP

Evaluation of SFP implementations can be conducted through Lutra Group, Inc. Their services are comprehensive, normed against a national data base, and extremely cost-competitive. All evaluations are supervised by the program developer and data is entered, analyzed and evaluated by staff at the Strengthening Families Program national office. A follow-up on-site visit once implementation has begun is often helpful in assuring fidelity and program effectiveness.

Dr. Henry Whiteside
Managing Partner
Lutra Group
5215 Pioneer Fork Road
Salt Lake City, Utah 84108-1678
Telephone: (801) 583-4601
Fax: (801) 583-7979
Email: hwhiteside@lutragroup.com

Who is the contact for the SFP?

For more information on this program, please contact:

Karol Kumpfer, PhD
Psychologist, Program Developer and Professor
Department of Health Promotion and Education, University of Utah
1901 East South Campus Drive, room 2142
Salt Lake City, Utah 84112
Telephone: (801) 582-1562
Fax: (801) 581-5872
E-mail: karol.kumpfer@health.utah.edu
Website: http://www.strengtheningfamiliesprogram.org/

The Ally Intervention Program

The Ally Intervention Program in a nutshell

The Ally Intervention Program is a multimodal intervention program intended for youths who exhibit behavioural problems at school and at home and are considered to be at risk of school and social maladjustment. It was designed to enrich the repertoire of social and interpersonal problem-solving skills for these individuals. To be beneficial in the long term, this type of program requires the direct involvement of the people who have the most impact in the lives of youths, and so proposes a combination of interventions among 3 main socialization agents: family, school, and peers. The Ally Intervention Program makes it possible to intervene in a consistent way that is better suited to life circumstances, and to foster a sense of security in youths while creating a new form of solidarity between parents and the school.

What are the goals of the Ally Intervention Program?

The main goal of the Ally Intervention Program is to prevent the appearance and the aggravation of behavioural problems in school-age children. Its other main objectives are to enhance:

Who is the target population for the Ally Intervention Program?

The Ally Intervention Program is intended for elementary school students aged 8 to 12 years old who exhibit behavioural problems at school and at home and are considered to be at risk of school and social maladjustment.

Participants are selected for participation in the program based on indicators such as aggressiveness, opposition, provocation, difficulties in social relations, the attribution of hostile and negative intentions to others, social rejection by peers, and affiliation with deviant peers. Participants must demonstrate a minimum of functional skills which enable them to benefit from group intervention.

What types of settings are appropriate to implement the Ally Intervention Program?

The implementation of the Ally Intervention Program is best suited for the school setting. Because of its educational mission and the opportunities it offers to work daily with children, the school is a privileged milieu within which to design and implement preventive actions. A team of educators (teachers and professionals) are dedicated to supporting children in their learning and encourage the development of their intellectual, behavioural and social skills.

What are the key components for the implementation of the Ally Intervention Program?

The Ally Intervention Program features 2 intervention components facilitated by professionals in the field:

The time required to facilitate the program is divided as follows:

What are critical elements for the implementation of the Ally Intervention Program?

Some of the critical elements for the implementation of the Ally Intervention Program include:

What are some of the risk factors targeted by the Ally Intervention Program?

Some of the risk factors targeted by the Ally Intervention Program are:

What are some of the protective factors targeted by the Ally Intervention Program?

Some of the protective factors targeted by the Ally Intervention Program are:

What are the results from evaluation studies of the Ally Intervention Program?

Evaluation studies of the Ally Intervention Program have shown the following:

What are the materials needed for the implementation of the Ally Intervention Program?

The typical resources needed for implementing the Ally Intervention Program include the educational package (available in both French and in English) which comprises the following:

What staff is needed to implement the Ally Intervention Program?

The following staffing requirements must be met to implement the Ally Intervention Program:

What training is needed for staff in implementing the Ally Intervention Program?

Training is offered with the purchase of the Ally Intervention Program to ensure its optimal and successful use. The program designers offer various training packages and personalized services to support the structure and educators involved in teaching the program. It is possible to receive program training in both French and English.

The cost of the program includes training for a period of 3 hours and telephone support for up to 5 conference calls. Also, there are additional optional services that can be discussed with the developers to see if these services can be offered:

What are the estimated costs for the Ally Intervention Program?

Materials and Training

Mandatory:

Optional:

Overall Costs for Implementation

What is the cost-benefit of the Ally Intervention Program?

The National Crime Prevention Centre (NCPC) is currently not aware of any study that has been conducted on the cost-benefit of the Ally Intervention Program.

What other programs have been developed based on the Ally Intervention Program?

Based on discussions with the program developers, there are no other programs that have been developed based on the Ally Intervention Program.

Who is the contact for the Ally Intervention Program?

For more information on this program, please contact:

Nadia Desbiens
Professor
Projet l'Allié, Faculté des sciences de l'éducation, Université de Montréal
Pavillon Marie-Victorin C.P. 6128, succ. Centre-ville
Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7
Telephone: (514) 343-7436
E-mail: nadia.desbiens@umontreal.ca
Website: www.projet-allie.ca

Endnotes

  1. 1

    Note: Revisions are currently being made to the existing Supervision Manual. The original manual is available upon request.

  2. 2

    The original LRP has developed benchmark expectations for first year participants that include a 0.5 increase in GPA, a 50% increase in school attendance, a 50% reduction in school disciplinary reports, and an increase in the three resiliency competency areas. If these figures are not achieved, implementation should be examined and, as appropriate, adjusted to improve its effectiveness. To date, the original LRP has consistently exceeded its benchmarked outcomes, further increasing levels of local support for LRP programming. Reports from replication sites indicate similar outcomes.

  3. 3

    This version of the guidelines is for the standard MDFT program, adjustment have been made in the criteria for prevention MDFT or residential MDFT.

  4. 4

    Drs. David Farrington & Christopher Koegl (Cambridge University, UK): criminological cost‐benefit analyses reviewing effect sizes from external random control 3rd party SNAP® evaluation studies; Astwood Strategy Corporation, Dr. Depeng Jiang (University of Manitoba) & Donna Smith‐Moncreiffe (Senior Analyst National Crime Prevention Centre, NCPC): Multi‐site cost effective analyses on NCPC funded replications.

  5. 5

    Society for Safe and Caring Schools and Communities (SSCSC): Alberta 2011, conducted a Social Return on Investment (SROI) on its SNAP® pilot implementation as part of its funding requirements (Justice Alberta); SiMPACT assisted SSCSC with this process.

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