Report on the Beyond the Border Action Plan: Horizontal Initiative for 2011-12 and 2012-13

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On February 4, 2011, the Prime Minister of Canada and the President of the United States issued Beyond the Border: A Shared Vision for Perimeter Security and Economic CompetitivenessFootnote 1. The Declaration initiated a new long-term partnership between the two countries that was built upon a perimeter approach to security and economic competitiveness. Through the perimeter approach, Canada and the U.S. committed to working together at, and beyond the border, to enhance our security and accelerate the legitimate flow of people, goods and services. The Beyond the Border (BTB) Action Plan, released in December 2011, embodies this collaboration and engagement between the two countries, and sets out specific initiatives (Appendix A) to secure the Canada-U.S. border and perimeter while facilitating legitimate trade and travel.

The purpose of this report is to provide a whole-of-government perspective on performance in the implementation of the Action Plan and to document the significant progress that has been made on BTB initiatives from the announcement of the Action Plan in December 2011 to the end of the 2012-13 fiscal year (FY). Numerous departments and agencies are involved in ensuring that each Action Plan initiative is successfully implemented. Details regarding progress achieved on specific initiatives can be found in each organization's Departmental Performance Report (DPR). For more information and descriptions of Action Plan initiatives, please consult the Beyond the Border Action PlanFootnote 2. This report collected information from all participating departments and agencies leading and supporting initiatives, with Public Safety Canada (PS) coordinating the exercise. While this report focuses on highlights for Canada, joint Canada-U.S. implementation reports are released annually as per the Action PlanFootnote 3.

The Action Plan sets out joint priorities for achieving a secure and efficient Canada-U.S. border within four areas of cooperation: Addressing Threats Early; Trade Facilitation, Economic Growth and Jobs; Cross-Border Law Enforcement; and, Critical Infrastructure and Cyber Security. In total, 32 initiatives are listed under the four areas, with numerous Canadian departments and agencies working to ensure their successful accomplishment. Two additional initiatives are included to ensure the responsible sharing of information and to oversee the successful implementation of the Action Plan.

Figure 1: Beyond the Border Action Plan ultimate outcomes:

Figure 1: Beyond the Border Action Plan ultimate outcomes:

Image Description

This image illustrates the Beyond the Border Action Plan's desired outcomes. There are five ultimate outcomes and two governance-related outcomes which are all linked to specific Beyond the Border Action Plan initiatives. The outcomes are as follows:

Ultimate Outcomes:

The Canada – United States border and perimeter are secure and legitimate trade and travel are facilitated (all Beyond the Border Action Plan initiatives)

Threats are stopped before they arrive either in Canada or in the United States (Initiatives 1-11)

Legitimate travel and cargo are stimulated and expedited (Initiatives 8, 10, 12-15 and 20-24)

Criminals are prevented from leveraging the Canada-United States border to commit transnational crimes (Initiatives 24-26)

Canada and the United States are prepared for and can respond to threats and emergencies (Initiatives 27-32)

Governance Outcomes:

Governance oversees the successful implementation of the Action Plan to maintain transparency and accountability (Initiative 33)

Privacy principles inform and guide information and intelligence-sharing under the BTB Action plan (Initiative 34)

 

Financial Resources – 2012-13 Beyond the Border Action Plan:

Department/Agency

2012-13 ($ units)
New Funding Internal Reallocation Total Planned Spending Actual Spending
Theme 1 - Addressing Threats Early (Initiatives 1-11) $25,783,250 $47,186,074 $72,969,324 $24,352,547
Theme 2 - Trade Facilitation, Economic Growth and Jobs (Initiatives 12-24) $21,926,069 $8,213,283 $30,139,352 $16,121,863
Theme 3 - Cross-Border Law Enforcement (Initiatives 25 and 26) $9,470,158 $260,857 $9,731,015 $4,416,993
Theme 4 - Critical Infrastructure and Cyber Security (Initiatives 27-32) $1,631,157 $875,544 $2,506,701 $2,897,337
Managing our New Long-Term Partnership (Initiatives 33 and 34) $1,496,183 $501,018 $1,997,201 $1,492,551
TOTAL $60,306,817 $57,036,776 $117,343,593 $49,281,291

Theme 1 - Addressing Threats Early (Initiatives 1-11):

Addressing threats at the earliest possible point is essential to strengthening the shared security of Canada and the U.S. It will enable both countries to improve the free flow of legitimate goods and people across the Canada-United States border. The Beyond the Border Action Plan will support this goal by developing a common understanding of the threat environment; aligning and coordinating our security systems for goods, cargo and baggage; and supporting the effective identification of people who pose a threat, which will enhance safety and facilitate the movement of legitimate travellers.

Outcomes:Footnote 4

Figure 2: Theme 1 Outcomes

Image Description

This image illustrates the outcomes of Theme 1 of the Beyond the Border Action Plan. This theme is called Addressing Threats Early. The figure demonstrates the linkages between the Intermediate Outcomes and the Ultimate Outcomes for Theme 1. The outcomes are also linked to specific Beyond the Border Action Plan initiatives.

The Intermediate Outcomes for Theme 1 are:

Canada and the United States share a common approach to effectively identify threats to either country (Initiatives 1-4 and 7)

Also, in dotted lines is an outcome stating that Ports of entry focus on high-risk goods and individuals by expediting low-risk cargo, passenger baggage and individuals entering either country (Initiatives 5, 6, 8-16 and 20, 22, 24). This is an intermediate outcome which is shared between Theme 1 and Theme 2. Theme 2 is called Trade Facilitation, Economic Growth and Jobs.

The Ultimate Outcomes for Theme 1 are:

Threats are stopped before they arrive either in Canada or in the United States (Initiatives 1-11).

Also, in dotted lines is an outcome stating that Legitimate travel and cargo is stimulated and expedited (Initiatives 8, 10, 12-15 and 20-24). This is an ultimate outcome which is shared between Theme 1 and Theme 2.

Financial Table:

Theme 1 - Addressing Threats Early (Initiatives 1-11)Footnote 5

Theme 1 - Addressing Threats Early (Initiatives 1-11)Footnote 5

Department/Agency

2012-13 ($ units)
New Funding Internal Reallocation Total Planned Spending Actual Spending
Canada Border Services AgencyFootnote i $16,515,645 $8,044,557 $24,560,202 $14,756,559
Canadian Food Inspection Agency $0 $184,000 $184,000 $184,000
Citizenship and Immigration CanadaFootnote ii $8,255,711 $799,068 $9,054,779 $5,976,778
Public Safety Canada $0 $386,473 $386,473 $381,186
Royal Canadian Mounted Police $1,011,894 $289,146 $1,301,040 $801,057
Transport CanadaFootnote iii $0 $37,482,830 $37,482,830 $2,252,967
TOTAL $25,783,250 $47,186,074 $72,969,324 $24,352,547

 

Performance Metrics

Performance Metrics
  2011-12 2012-13
Ultimate Outcome: Threats are stopped before they arrive either in Canada or the United States
Indicator 1: Percentage of annual national security priorities on which action has been taken To be measured in 2013-14
Indicator 2: Percentage of immigration investigations initiated that result in a person being identified as inadmissible to Canada

To be measured in 2013-14

Indicator 3: Number of enforcement actions taken that were facilitated by targeting -Footnote 6 2003

Intermediate Outcome 1: Canada and the United States share a common approach to effectively identify threats to either country

Indicator 1: In consultation with U.S. law enforcement, (a) the number of priority sensor gaps identified and (b) the number of priority sensor gaps for which remedial measures have been developed (RCMP) - -Footnote 7

Indicator 2: Percentage of U.S. strategic-level operations centers connected with the Canadian Government Operations Centre (GOC)Footnote 8 to facilitate information flow and sharing

100%

100%

Intermediate Outcome 2: Ports of entry focus on high-risk goods and individuals by expediting low-risk cargo, passenger baggage and individuals entering either country

Indicator 1: Percentage of people examined at ports of entry who are inadmissible and/or arrested 5% 3.2%

Indicator 2: Average passage processing time (from Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) capture to Border Services Officer (BSO) decision, in land mode) in NEXUS lanes vs. conventional lanes

NEXUS: 17 seconds

Conventional:
45 seconds

NEXUS: 13 seconds

Conventional:
43 seconds

 

Canada and the United States share a common approach to effectively identify threats to either country (Initiatives 1-4 and 7)

Initiatives 1 (Joint Threat Assessments) and 2 (Information/Intelligence Sharing): As committed in the Action Plan, Public Safety Canada, along with the U.S. Office of the Director of National Intelligence and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and in coordination with relevant intelligence agencies in both countries, produced a joint inventory of existing intelligence work and a gap analysis, and enhanced the collaborative process used to produce joint intelligence assessments. These steps resulted in new assessments and have better institutionalized analytic collaboration that will improve both ongoing and future joint intelligence products. PS and DHS also worked to enhance the understanding of each country's legal, policy and operational approaches to information sharing for national security purposes.  

Initiative 3 (Domain Awareness): To improve domain awareness in the air, land and maritime environments, during the review period, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP), in collaboration with Canadian partners and in cooperation with U.S. counterparts, created and completed a full inventory of Canadian and U.S. domain awareness capabilities at the border to identify gaps and vulnerabilities. A Canadian validation exercise was completed in 2012-13 and the national RCMP Border Integrity Technology Working Group held meetings in Cornwall during which the data pertaining to existing RCMP border technology were validated and a preliminary gap analysis was conducted. By using bi-national threat and risk assessments and prioritizing coverage gaps, with a view to jointly deploying new technology to address these identified gaps, Canada and the United States are effectively identifying threats to either country.

Initiative 4 (Countering Violent Extremism): Throughout 2012-13, relevant Canadian departments and agencies collaborated with their U.S. counterparts to implement the joint countering violent extremism work plan by coordinating and sharing research, best practices and tools for law enforcement, and emphasizing community-based and community-driven efforts. This included a May 2012 meeting, coordinated by PS, of the Canada-U.S. Countering Violent Extremism Working Group that focused on the theme of building local-level capacity and empowering communities to prevent and counter violent extremism. PS and DHS presented two progress reports to the Minister of Public Safety and the Secretary of Homeland Security in September 2012 and March 2013, respectively, thereby meeting the ongoing commitment in the Action Plan.

Initiative 7 (Joint Food/Plant/Animal Assessments/Audits): The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) worked with the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to better protect both countries from offshore food safety, animal and plant health risks by conducting joint assessments of plant, animal and food safety systems in third countries for the first time. Highlights from 2012-13 include joint animal health-related assessments with the USDA in Columbia and Mexico and plant health-related joint assessments in Japan and China. Through close collaboration with CFIA’s U.S. counterparts, this initiative has increased the confidence in each regulatory agency’s assessment processes. By sharing the results of assessments, this initiative not only offers potential future resource savings for both countries but also contributes to diminishing potential risks from entering North America.   

Ports of entry focus on high-risk goods and individuals by expediting low-risk cargo, passenger baggage and individuals entering either country (Initiatives 5, 6, 8-11)

Initiative 5 (Integrated Cargo Security): During the review period, Canada and the U.S. developed an Integrated Cargo Security Strategy (ICSS), a perimeter approach to inbound cargo security under the principle of “cleared once, accepted twice”. To inform the implementation of the ICSS, two pilots were launched by the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) and U.S. Customs Border Protection (CBP) which involve the two agencies collaborating to risk assess and examine offshore marine cargo arriving to the ports of Prince Rupert (marine-to-rail) and Montreal (marine-to-truck), destined to the U.S., eliminating the need for redundant inspections at the shared land border.

CBSA, in partnership with Transport Canada (TC), also launched a Pre-Load Air Cargo Targeting pilot under which air cargo destined to Canada arriving from offshore is assessed for aviation and national security purposes prior to departure, similar to a pilot the U.S. already had in place.

To further enhance perimeter security, Canada and U.S. each formally reviewed the other’s national air cargo security program including: program design, regulations, oversight and compliance, as well as audit and site validation visits. As a result of this process, TC and the U.S. Transportation Security Administration (TSA) achieved mutual recognition of their respective programs effective March 31, 2012, thereby eliminating the need for re-screening of individual air cargo shipments, barring receipt of new information. CBSA and CBP also developed common sets of data elements required for in-bond (United States) / in-transit (Canada) shipments arriving from offshore and for domestic shipments which transit through the other country, limiting the data sets required to those necessary for effective, risk-based enforcement.

Initiative 6 (Passenger Baggage Screening): Eliminating unnecessary re-screening of passenger baggage is also an important initiative under the Action Plan. Canada began deployment of new Explosive Detection Systems equipment at preclearance airports in February 2012. In keeping with the Action Plan, as new technology is deployed at pre-clearance airports, the U.S. is progressively lifting the re-screening requirement.

Initiatives 8 (Electronic Travel Authorization) and 9 (Interactive Advance Passenger Information): As part of the Action Plan, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) undertook work to develop the Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) initiative in order to improve screening of all visa-exempt foreign nationals. Progress was made throughout 2012-13. Key highlights included Royal Assent to the eTA enabling legislation contained in amendments to the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. Progress was also made to establish a common approach to screening travellers through the CBSA’s Interactive Advance Passenger Information (IAPI) initiative, which will be implemented to make “board/no-board” decisions on all travellers flying to Canada prior to departure.

Initiative 10 (Immigration Information Sharing): In the reporting period, progress was made towards the implementation of the immigration information sharing initiative that would permit both countries to share relevant information to improve immigration and border determinations, establish and verify the identities of travellers, and provide immigration decision makers with enhanced information that will facilitate screenings at the earliest possible opportunity. The Agreement between the Government of Canada and the Government of the United States of America for the Sharing of Visa and Immigration Information (the “Treaty”) was signed on December 13, 2012, with ratification and entry into force expected in late Fall 2013. The Treaty will govern systematic information sharing between the two countries for third-country nationals who apply to either country for a visa, work or study permit or for inland asylum.

Initiative 11 (Entry/Exit Information System): Finally, Phase I of the Entry/Exit initiative, which establishes and coordinates entry and exit information systems, was carried out successfully in 2012-13. Phase I was comprised of a pilot project where data of third country nationals, permanent residents of Canada and lawful permanent residents of the U.S. were exchanged at four automated common land border ports of entry.

Theme 2 – Trade Facilitation, Economic Growth and Jobs (Initiatives 12-24):

The free flow of goods and services between Canada and the United States creates immense economic benefits for both countries. As the two countries work to strengthen the security of the shared perimeter, initiatives to create more openness at the land border for legitimate travel and trade are being pursued. The Beyond the Border Action Plan enhances the benefits of programs that help trusted businesses and travellers move efficiently across the border, introduces new measures to facilitate movement and trade across the border while reducing the administrative burden for business, and invests in improvements to the shared border infrastructure and technology.

OutcomesFootnote 9:

Figure 3: Theme 2 Outcomes

Image Description

This image illustrates the outcomes of Theme 2 of the Beyond the Border Action Plan. This theme is called Trade Facilitation, Economic Growth and Jobs. This figure demonstrates the linkages between the Intermediate Outcomes and the Ultimate Outcomes for Theme 2. The outcomes are also linked to specific Beyond the Border Action Plan initiatives.

The Intermediate Outcomes for Theme 2 are:

Ports of entry focus on high-risk goods and individuals by expediting low-risk cargo, passenger baggage and individuals entering the country (Initiatives 5, 6, 8-16 and 20, 22, 24).

Processes, incentives and infrastructure facilitate cross-border trade (Initiatives 12 -24).

Also, in dotted lines is an outcome stating that Canada and the United States cooperate on national security and transnational criminal investigations (Initiatives 24-26). This is an intermediate outcome which is shared between Theme 2 and Theme 3.  Theme 3 is called Cross-Border Law Enforcement.

The Ultimate Outcomes for Theme 2 are:

Legitimate travel and cargo is stimulated and expedited (Initiatives 8, 10, 12-15 and 20-24).

Also, in dotted lines is an outcome stating that Criminals are prevented from leveraging the Canada-United States border to commit transnational crimes (Initiatives 24-26). This is an intermediate outcome which is shared between Theme 2 and Theme 3.


Financial Table:

Theme 2 – Trade Facilitation, Economic Growth and Jobs (Initiatives 12-24)Footnote 10:

Theme 2 – Trade Facilitation, Economic Growth and Jobs (Initiatives 12-24)Footnote 10:

Department/Agency

2012-13 ($ units)
New Funding Internal Reallocation Total Planned Spending Actual Spending
Canada Border Services AgencyFootnote iv $19,576,069 $3,341,796 $22,917,865 $9,331,819
Canadian Food Inspection Agency $1,120,000 $45,000 $1,165,000 $1,104,000
Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada $400,000 $3,282,807 $3,682,807 $3,656,956
Public Safety Canada $0 $919,558 $919,558 $804,141
Transport Canada $830,000 $624,122 $1,454,122 $1,224,947
TOTAL $21,926,069 $8,213,283 $30,139,352 $16,121,863

 

Performance Metrics:

Performance Metrics:
  2011-12 2012-13
Ultimate Outcome: Legitimate travel and cargo are stimulated and expedited
Indicator 1: Percentage of border wait-time standards that are achieved - -Footnote 11
Indicator 2: Number and value for duty of imports by Customs Self Assessment (CSA)/Partners in Protection (PIP) members and total for CBSA -Footnote 12 CSA
# of imports: 1,181,176
$ value for duty: $88,826,000

PIP:
# of imports:713,660
$ value for duty:
$35,779,000  

Total for CBSA (by all types of importers):
# of imports: 13,993,256
$ value for duty: $461,157,000
Indicator 3: Percentage of Trusted Traveller passages out of all passages 7.05% 7.82%
Intermediate Outcome: Processes, incentives and infrastructure facilitate cross-border trade
Indicator 1: Number of new applications, change in the number of members and total membership for Trusted Trader programs:
  • Partners in Protection (PIP)
  • Customs Self Assessment (CSA)
PIP:
  • 131 applications received
  • 66 new members
  • 1,485 total members

PIP:
  • 139 applications received
  • 90 new members
  • 1,527 total members
  • 2.83% increase in total membership
CSA:
  • 72 applications received
  • 66 new members
  • 923 total members
CSA:
  • 76 applications received
  • 58 new members
  • 957 total members
  • 3.68% increase in total membership
Indicator 2: Number of new applications and percentage change in the number of members for:
  • Commercial Driver Registration Program (CDRP)
  • Free and Secure Trade (FAST)
CDRP:
  • 566 applications received
  • 22.13% decrease in total membership
CDRP:
  • 824 applications received
  • 21% decrease in total membership
FAST:
  • 6,512 applications received
  • 3.62% decrease in total membership
FAST:
  • 7,111 applications received
  • 0.64% decrease in total membership
Indicator 3: Percentage of Trusted Trader shipments that are examined CSA Importer: 0.23%Footnote 13 CSA Importer: 0.27%
PIP Importer: 0.81%
Intermediate Outcome: Ports of Entry focus on high risk goods and individuals by expediting low-risk cargo, passenger baggage and individuals entering either country
Indicator 1: Average passage processing time (from RFID capture to BSO decision in land mode) in NEXUS lanes vs. conventional lanes NEXUS: 17 seconds

Conventional: 45 seconds
NEXUS: 13 seconds

Conventional: 43 seconds
Indicator 2: Number of new applications and percentage change in the number of members for NEXUS NEXUS:
  • 200,202 applications received
  • 660,632 total members
  • 26.28% increase in total membership
NEXUS:
  • 215,586 applications received
  • 833,295 total members
  • 26.14% increase in total membership



Ports of entry focus on high risk goods and individuals by expediting low-risk cargo, passenger baggage and individuals entering either country (Initiatives 5, 6, 8-16 and 20, 22, 24)

Initiative 12 (Enhancing Benefits for Trusted Trader Programs): The Action Plan commits Canada and the U.S. to align and enhance the benefits of Tier I and Tier II trusted programs to further facilitate the cross-border movement of low risk trade and reduce the costs of compliance with customs requirements.

Tier I Trusted Trader Program: The CBSA and the U.S. CBP conducted detailed comparisons of Canada's Partners in Protection (PIP) program and the U.S. Customs-Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (C-TPAT) program to identify opportunities to harmonize eligibility criteria, program requirements and operational policies and procedures.

Tier II Trusted Trader Program: The CBSA and the U.S. CBP conducted detailed comparisons of Canada's Customs Self Assessment (CSA) program and the U.S. Importer Self Assessment (ISA) program, providing the basis to explore areas to further enhance benefits to participating importers. Additionally, CBSA and CBP held two joint consultation sessions with participants on Tier II trusted trader programs to identify and assess additional ways to expedite border processes.

A number of pilots launched since the beginning of the Action Plan to expedite low-risk cargo crossing at the Canada-U.S. border were completed successfully in 2012-13. The CFIA and the CBSA completed a pilot in July 2012 to assess the feasibility of allowing non-federally registered food products such as cereals, granola bars, and chocolate chips to be eligible for the CSA program.

A pilot under the Free and Secure Trade (FAST) program, known as the FAST Expansion Pilot, was also conducted in 2012-13. The pilot operated at the Sarnia Bluewater Bridge, from October 2012 to April 2013, in order to evaluate the impact of expanding FAST benefits to organizations listed under the PIP program and CSA members, and to collect baseline data through radio frequency identification technology (RFID). For this pilot, 12 carrier companies volunteered as participants and, while there was less than the expected uptake during the pilot, it was successful in providing sufficient baseline data, such as time savings. The information collected, along with a subsequent evaluation, will provide a basis for informed decision-making related to the FAST expansion.

Initiative 13 (Increasing Harmonized Benefits to NEXUS Members): In 2012-13, Trusted Traveller programs continued to achieve success with measures intended to increase participation in the NEXUS program and increase the number of NEXUS entries into Canada. The U.S. now recognizes NEXUS membership for trusted traveller lines at pre-board screening points for flights from Canada to the United States. Canadian NEXUS members are now eligible to participate in the TSA risk-based screening program (TSA Pre✓™). Members can use this program when booking travel reservations for flights on a participating airline from a participating airport within the U.S. and to select international destinations.

In 2012-13, designated Trusted Traveller lines were present at pre-board screening checkpoints in eight major Canadian airports. At six other Canadian airports, NEXUS members accessed a dedicated entrance allowing them to proceed directly to the front of the screening line.

Total NEXUS passages in FY2012-13 were 22.5% higher than in 2011-12 (6,491,586 vs. 5,300,993). The increase in the percentage of trusted travellers has contributed to a more efficient use of CBSA's resources at ports of entry. As a result, CBSA can focus resources on higher risk travellers.

An increase in NEXUS applications (25% in 2011-12 and 7.5% in 2012-13) created a need for CBSA and the U.S. CBP to implement several joint measures, including enrolment blitzes to reduce wait times for applicants. These activities were successful in reducing, but not eliminating, lengthy wait times for applicant interviews, which totaled an average of 145 days in 2012-13.

Processes, incentives and infrastructure facilitate cross-border trade (Initiatives 12-24)

Initiative 14 (Enhancing Facilities to Support Trusted Trader and Traveller Programs): As part of its Action Plan commitments, during the review period the CBSA implemented five total additional NEXUS lanes; three in British Columbia (Pacific Highway, Douglas and Abbotsford); and two in Ontario (Sarnia and Fort Erie).

Initiative 15 (Pre-Inspection and Preclearance): On March 14, 2013, Canada and the United States signed a Memorandum of Understanding for a two-phased truck cargo pre-inspection pilot project on Canadian soil.

Initiative 16 (Facilitating the Conduct of Cross-Border Business): Under the Action Plan, the United States and Canada committed to specific measures to facilitate the conduct of cross-border business and to propose options for regular stakeholder engagement on cross-border business travel. In May 2012, the governments of Canada and the United States held joint stakeholder consultations in Washington and Toronto. Stakeholders were also invited to submit online suggestions and comments and a summary of the consultations was published.

Progress has been made on each of these Action Plan measures including the training of front-line officers to improve the consistency of border determinations, changes to the NEXUS client profile to allow for the incorporation of work permit information, and changes to existing rules authorizing temporary entry of business visitors who provide after-sale service, so they apply equally to those who provide after-lease service as per designated contractual agreements.

Initiative 17 (Single Window): The CBSA, in collaboration with nine other participating government departments and agencies (PGAs) and in consultation with industry, established the foundation – including business and user requirements – needed to, over the next three years, fully automate and expedite border-related decisions on goods subject to PGA regulatory requirements as well as provide PGAs with ex-post facto data without creating a new administrative burden to industry.

Initiative 18 (Harmonizing Low Value Shipment Thresholds): On January 8, 2013, CBSA and CBP concurrently increased their low value shipment thresholds to $2,500, from the existing level of $1,600 in Canada and $2,000 in the U.S., thereby fulfilling an Action Plan commitment. With this initiative, a greater number of commercial shipments can now be processed through the expedited and simplified Postal and Courier Low Value Shipment Programs, thereby improving both processing times and cost savings for the importing community. It is estimated that an average of 125,000 additional shipments per month could be processed through the expedited and simplified Courier Low Value Shipments and Postal Programs. In addition, Canada increased the low-value shipment threshold to $2,500 for exemption from North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Certificate of Origin requirements, aligning it with the current threshold of the U.S. 

Initiative 19 (Accountability for Border Fees/Charges): To bring greater public transparency and accountability to the application of fees and charges at the Canada-U.S. border, Public Safety Canada and U.S. Customs and Border Protection assembled preliminary inventories of fees charged at the border. Preparatory work was completed with U.S. and other Government of Canada departments and agencies, and stakeholders to proceed with an economic impact assessment of border fees on three industry sectors.

Initiative 20 (Expanding and Upgrading Infrastructure at Key Crossings): To further reduce wait times, in 2012-13, major infrastructure investments of up to $47 million were announced for the key border crossing of Lacolle, Quebec. As part of the initiative to upgrade and expand infrastructure at key crossings, TC, CBSA, the U.S. Department of Transportation and CBP developed the first-ever bi-national Border Infrastructure Investment Plan (BIIP).

Initiative 21 (Coordinating Investments at Small and Remote Ports of Entry): The Canada-U.S. Small Ports Working Group (SPWG) was established with members from the CBSA and CBP. The SPWG identified a list of 62 ports of entry for consideration under this initiative. A Canada-U.S. Work Plan for the Development of the Small and Remote Ports Joint Action Plan was included as part of the inaugural Border Infrastructure Investment Plan (BIIP), fulfilling the initial commitment for the joint development of joint action plans for small and remote ports.

Initiative 22 (Deploying Border Wait-Time Technology and Establishing Wait-Time Service Levels): Both CBSA and CBP met the Action Plan commitment to publish service level standards on their websites by June 2012. Transport Canada announced the launch of new border wait-time measurement systems at the Peace and Queenston-Lewiston bridges on July 17, 2012. U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the Peace Bridge Authority, the Niagara Falls Bridge Commission and the Niagara International Transportation Technology Coalition began providing real-time border wait time information on their websites in FY2012-13.

Initiative 23 (Installing RFID Technology): Under the Action Plan, Canada committed to the installation of RFID technology at appropriate crossings to align with existing U.S. investments. The CBSA continues to work towards the implementation of RFID-enabled lanes as committed in the Action Plan in order to facilitate secure passage and expedite border crossing.

Initiative 24 (Organizing Bi-National Port Operations Committees): Eight Bi-National Port Operations Committees (BPOCs) were established in early 2012 at each of the Canadian airports that provide U.S. preclearance, in addition to the 20 BPOCs established in 2011 at land border ports of entry. These individual BPOCs completed their Action Plans by March 31, 2012, and report excellent communication and cooperation in all of their joint engagements. Where partnerships are practical and permissible under current legislation, joint standard operating procedures (SOPs) have been written. As per the Action Plan commitment, the first year-end joint review of the BPOCs was completed by December 2012.

Theme 3 – Cross-Border Law Enforcement (Initiatives 25 and 26):

Canada and the United States have developed successful models for preventing criminals from crossing the border to escape justice. The Shiprider pilot program, for example, employs cross-designated officers to patrol the maritime areas between our two countries, while Integrated Border Enforcement Teams and Border Enforcement Security Task Forces support joint investigations and law enforcement action at and between ports of entry. The Action Plan moves forward with new initiatives that build on these successful law enforcement programs.

Outcomes:

Figure 4: Theme 3 Outcomes

Image Description

This image illustrates the outcomes of Theme 3 of the Beyond the Border Action Plan. This theme is called Cross-Border Law Enforcement. This figure demonstrates the linkages between the Intermediate Outcome and the Ultimate Outcome for Theme 3. The outcomes are also linked to specific Beyond the Border Action Plan initiatives.

The Intermediate Outcome is Canada and the United States cooperate on national security and transnational criminal investigations (Initiatives 24-26).

The Ultimate Outcome is Criminals are prevented from leveraging the Canada - United States border to commit transnational crimes (Initiatives 24-26).

Financial Table:

Theme 3 – Cross-Border Law Enforcement (Initiatives 25 and 26) Footnote 14

Theme 3 – Cross-Border Law Enforcement (Initiatives 25 and 26) Footnote 14

Department/Agency

2012-13 ($ units)
New Funding Internal Reallocation Total Planned Spending Actual Spending
Canada Border Services Agency $0 $41,585 $41,585 $41,585
Public Safety Canada $0 $219,272 $219,272 $222,030
Royal Canadian Mounted PoliceFootnote v $9,470,158 $0 $9,470,158 $4,153,378
TOTAL $9,470,158 $260,857 $9,731,015 $4,416,993

Performance Metrics:

Performance Metrics:
  2011-12 2012-13
Ultimate Outcome: Criminals are prevented from leveraging the Canada-U.S. Border to commit transnational crimes
Indicator 1: Percentage of border covered by radio interoperability systems -Footnote 15 12.5%Footnote 16
Indicator 2: Number of arrests and seizures as a result of Shiprider and Next Generation operations - -Footnote 17
Indicator 3: Percent of partners who strongly agree or agree with the statement "The RCMP is a valuable partner in protecting Canada's border" 84%Footnote 18 79%
Intermediate Outcome: Canada and the U.S. cooperate on national security and transnational criminal investigations
Indicator 1: Number of officers who have completed training for Shiprider and Next Generation operations 21 14
Indicator 2: Number of officers who are cross-designated for Shiprider and Next Generation operations -Footnote 19 66
Indicator 3: Number of regularized Shiprider teams deployed -Footnote 19 2Footnote 20

 

Canada and the United States cooperate on national security and transnational criminal investigations (Initiatives 24-26)

Initiative 25 (Pursuing National Security and Transnational Criminal Investigations): The Action Plan includes measures to facilitate a partnership between Canada and the U.S. with respect to national security and transnational criminal investigations. On June 29, 2012, legislation to implement the Framework Agreement to govern regularized Shiprider operations received Royal Assent. The legislation was ratified in August 2012 and Shiprider operations were regularized in British Columbia/Washington and Windsor/Detroit in June 2013. In 2012-13, fourteen additional RCMP officers completed the training for Shiprider Operations, and a total of 66 Canadian officers were cross-designated for Shiprider and Next Generation Operations. The program architecture and standard operating procedures for Next Generation pilot operations were largely finalized by September 2012. Deployment has been postponed, however, pending bilateral resolution of key outstanding legal and operational issues.

Initiative 26 (Radio Interoperability): A bi-national radio interoperability system between Canadian and U.S. border enforcement personnel was also introduced to permit law enforcement agencies to coordinate effective bi-national investigations, to allow for timely responses to border incidents, and to improve both officer and public safety. There was successful radio communications between U.S. and Canadian field staff via the Canadian National Operations Centre (NOC), the RCMP’s Border Integrity Operations Centre (BIOC) and the U.S. border law enforcement facilities located in Blaine, Washington. In addition, one of the eight interconnect dispatch locations on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border was successfully connected to increase “between the ports” communication in 2012-13 (BIOC to Blaine).

Theme 4 – Critical Infrastructure and Cyber Security (Initiatives 27-32):

Canada and the United States are connected by critical infrastructure — from bridges and roads to energy infrastructure and cyberspace. The Beyond the Border Action Plan includes measures to enhance the resilience of shared critical and cyber infrastructure and to enable the two countries to rapidly respond to and recover from disasters and emergencies on either side of the border.

Outcomes:

Figure 5: Theme 4 Outcomes

Image Description

This image illustrates the outcomes of Theme 4 of the Beyond the Border Action Plan. This theme is called Critical Infrastructure and Cyber Security. This figure demonstrates the linkages between the Intermediate Outcomes and the Ultimate Outcome for Theme 4. The outcomes are also linked to specific Beyond the Border Action Plan initiatives.

The Intermediate Outcomes for Theme 4 are:
Canada and the United States share a common approach to protect Critical Infrastructure and Cyberspace (Initiatives 27-29).

Canada and the United States can rapidly respond to and recover from disasters and emergencies on either side of the border (Initiatives 30-32).

The Ultimate Outcome is Canada and the United States are prepared for and can respond to threats and emergencies (Initiatives 27-32).

Financial Table:

Theme 4 – Critical Infrastructure and Cyber Security (Initiatives 27-32)

Theme 4 – Critical Infrastructure and Cyber Security (Initiatives 27-32)

Department/Agency

2012-13 ($ units)
New Funding Internal Reallocation Total Planned Spending Actual Spending
Canada Border Services Agency $0 $189,360 $189,360 $189,360
Public Safety CanadaFootnote vi $1,631,157 $463,264 $2,094,421 $2,485,057
Transport Canada $0 $222,920 $222,920 $222,920
TOTAL $1,631,157 $875,544 $2,506,701 $2,897,337

 

Performance Metrics:

Performance Metrics:
  2011-12 2012-13
Ultimate Outcome: Canada and the United States are prepared for and can respond to threats and emergencies
Indicator 1: Critical Infrastructure Resilience ScoreFootnote 21 To be measured in 2013-14
Intermediate Outcome: Canada and the United States share a common approach to protect Critical Infrastructure and Cyberspace
Indicator 1: Percentage of stakeholders that have taken risk management action following site assessment To be measured in 2014-15
Indicator 2: Number of training sessions conducted through Initiative 27 - Enhancing Cross-Border Critical Infrastructure and Resilience 4 5
Indicator 3: Percentage of critical infrastructure sectors represented at the National Cross Sector Forum 100% 100%
Indicator 4: Joint (Canada/U.S.) communication products developed (cyber security) -Footnote 22 5
Indicator 5: Number of joint or coordinated engagements with the private sector and external stakeholders, including joint briefings and presentations (cyber security) -Footnote 22 3
Intermediate Outcome: Canada and the United States can rapidly respond to and recover from disasters and emergencies on either side of the border
Indicator 1: Development of planning guides, communications and information-sharing protocols, and delivery of a table-top exercise to validate concepts and mechanisms in the maritime context 1 region in progress 1 of 3 regions
completedFootnote 23
Indicator 2: Percentage of priority land border crossings that are covered by a regional plan and validated through an exercise - 15%


Canada and the United States share a common approach to protect Critical Infrastructure and Cyberspace (Initiatives 27-29)

Initiative 27 (Enhancing Cross-Border Critical Infrastructure and Resilience): The Action Plan puts forth measures to enhance the resilience of shared Canada-United States critical and cyber infrastructure, and aims to establish a common and coordinated approach to protecting these systems of bi-national importance. In 2012-13, PS, in partnership with DHS, launched the cross-border pilot Regional Resilience Assessment Program (RRAP) in Maine/New Brunswick. The RRAP was implemented in an effort to bringtogether regional officials and private sector stakeholders to assess infrastructure of bi-national importance, analyze interdependencies and risks, and address identified gaps. PS and DHS also established the Virtual Risk Analysis Cell (VRAC) interagency organization to conduct joint risk analyses, develop collaborative cross-border analytical products and share methodologies and best practices to enhance critical infrastructure resilience.

Initiative 28 (Government and Digital Infrastructure): In the area of cybersecurity, PS and DHS co-authored and signed the Cybersecurity Action PlanFootnote 24, which aims to strengthen cyber security cooperation through enhanced integration and collaboration for joint cyber security activities. This Action Plan represents just one of many important efforts between the U.S. and Canada to deepen strong bilateral cyber security cooperation and advance the objectives articulated in the Action Plan. PS and DHS have also been delivering joint briefings and Industrial Control System workshops to the private sector as many entities have assets and interests in both the U.S. and Canada. Furthermore, joint engagement with the private sector leverages, where possible, established Critical Infrastructure Sector Networks, thus streamlining public-private partnerships and collaboration for the shared responsibility of cyber security.

At the operational level, the Computer Emergency Response Teams (CERT) of both nations: U.S.-CERT, Industrial Control Systems or ICS-CERT (U.S.), and the Canadian Cyber Incidence Response Centre (CCIRC), now regularly communicate to share threat information and strategies aimed at improving cyber resilience of critical infrastructure. Protocols have also been aligned to be effective when responding to a reported cyber-attack and, joint products have been disseminated to stakeholders in both countries to identify best practices and increase awareness of cyber security issues.

Initiative 29 (Expanding Joint Leadership on International Cybersecurity Efforts): An open, safe, and trusted cyberspace is essential to Canada's competitive advantage in the global marketplace, and our international outreach reflects these objectives. Canada participated in several international activities over the last year to advance joint leadership on international cyber security efforts. Of note was Canada's participation in a study committee comprised of 15 nations that drafted recommendations to the Secretary General of the United Nations regarding threats to international cyberspace. While this is the third study on cyber security that has been convened by the United Nations over the past decade, the 2013 study is noteworthy as it was the first time a consensus was reached with respect to international law as it applies in cyberspace. Achieving this milestone had been a key objective of both the Canadian and American delegations.

 

Canada and the United States can rapidly respond to and recover from disasters and emergencies on either side of the border (Initiatives 30-32)

Initiative 30 (Mitigating the Impacts of Disruptions on Communities and the Economy): On May 14, 2012, PS and DHS published the Considerations for United States-Canada Border Traffic Disruption Management guideFootnote 25, which provides guidance and outlines important issues to consider when developing or updating existing regional and local border traffic management plans for traffic moving to and away from the border. Regional workshops were held across Canada to initiate dialogue on the development of regional border traffic management plans and, in March 2013, PS, in partnership with CBP and CBSA, hosted a joint table-top exercise to strengthen emergency traffic management plans and procedures in the Buffalo-Niagara cross-border region. This exercise represents an important part of

Canada's ongoing efforts to advance an integrated and multi-jurisdictional approach to managing border traffic during emergencies. Through the BTB Action Plan, measures are also being put in place to develop a joint cross-border approach to expedite maritime commerce recovery after a major disruption. In 2012-13, TC and the U.S. Coast Guard, in consultation with other government departments and industry stakeholders in both countries, developed planning guides, communications and information sharing protocols to support the recovery of maritime trade following an emergency in the Canadian-U.S. Pacific Region. In the Pacific Region, the Pacific Northwest Economic Region (PNWER), through its Center for Regional Disaster Resilience (CRDR), was identified as the appropriate forum for this work. These efforts were validated in October 2012 through a bi-national table-top exercise.

Initiative 31 (Enhancing Preparedness for Health Security Threats): The Action Plan established the Health Security Working Group (HSWG) to enhance collective preparedness for health-security threats. The HSWG has been working to develop and implement joint measures to reduce potential impacts of shared health-security risks and has established a two-year work plan outlining specific deliverables in areas such as risk assessment, information exchange, cross-border health-security partnerships and health emergency interoperability.

Initiative 32 (Emergency Management CBRNE and Interoperability): Two additional working groups were created to jointly improve the ability of Canada and the U.S. to prepare for and respond to bi-national disasters. The CBRNE Working Group and the Canada-United States Communications Interoperability Working Group (CIWG) were put in place to explore ways to bolster cross-border situational awareness and sharing of alerts and warnings, as well as facilitating the movement of emergency responders across the border. In 2012, these respective working groups developed five-year work plans that establish a number of deliverables, including: creating joint training and exercise opportunities, exchanging information, and sharing lessons learned and best practices. In March 2013, the CIWG conducted a technology demonstration, called the Canada-U.S. Enhanced Resiliency Experiment (CAUSE) which successfully tested the interoperability of the Canadian Multi-Agency Situational Awareness System (MASAS)Footnote 26, the American Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS)Footnote 27 and the Virtual USA PlatformFootnote 28. Specifically, this exercise tested the state of emergency communications interoperability between Maine and New Brunswick. Moreover, the CIWG implemented a SharePoint site for its members to improve interoperability and both countries have begun engaging stakeholders at all levels of government to better map cross-border interoperability initiatives.

Managing our New Long-Term Partnership (Initiatives 33 and 34):

Financial Table:

Managing our New Long-Term Partnership (Initiatives 33 and 34)


Department/Agency

2012-13 ($ units)
New Funding Internal Reallocation Total Planned Spending Actual Spending
Privy Council OfficeFootnote vii $1,496,183 $181,630 $1,677,813 $1,096,505
Public Safety Canada $0 $319,388 $319,388 $396,046
TOTAL $1,496,183 $501,018 $1,997,201 $1,492,551

 

Governance to oversee the successful implementation and to maintain transparency and accountability

Initiative 33 (BTB Governance and Oversight): As committed to in the Action Plan, in 2012-13, a joint Canada-U.S. Executive Steering Committee was created to oversee and monitor progress on the implementation of the Action Plan initiatives and to identify areas of further work. To ensure efforts within the Government of Canada – and between the Government of Canada and the United States Government – are well coordinated, and to identify, and respond to, potential issues with Action Plan initiatives, the Border Implementation Team was established, reporting to the Prime Minister through the Clerk of the Privy Council. This Team works through the Deputy Ministers' and the Assistant Deputy Ministers' Core Border Committees. The committees met on a biweekly basis in 2012, and on a monthly basis in 2013. This focused senior management attention has permitted timely response and feedback on issues as they arise, the development and oversight of a coherent approach to assessing progress, and monitoring of the application of privacy principles.

Privacy principles to inform and guide information- and intelligence-sharing under the BTB Action Plan

Initiative 34 (Developing a Statement of Privacy Principles and Practices): Responsible sharing of personal information between Canada and the U.S., in accordance with the domestic laws of both countries, is a cornerstone of the Action Plan. An early deliverable under the Plan was the CanadaU.S. Joint Statement of Privacy PrinciplesFootnote 29, released in June 2012. The 12 principles cover the provision, receipt, and use of personal information exchanged by Canada and the United States pursuant to any information-sharing arrangements and initiatives under the Action Plan, are consistent with domestic privacy laws in both countries, and were inspired in part by international standards and guidelines on privacy (OECD, EU-U.S.)Footnote 30. To date, the principles have been concretely applied to a number of arrangements, including Phase I of Entry/ExitFootnote 31 and the Agreement between the Government of Canada and the Government of the United States of America for the Sharing of Visa and Immigration InformationFootnote 32.

Conclusion:

The purpose of this report is to provide a horizontal perspective of departmental performance against Action Plan deliverables. Significant progress has been achieved on all themes of the Action Plan, and as more initiatives are implemented, plans and progress will be tracked in upcoming Reports on Plans and Priorities (RPP) and Departmental Performance Reports (DPR). Public Safety Canada will continue to work with participating departments and agencies to collect the performance and financial information and to report on overall plans and progress.

Many of the performance measures listed in this report will serve as a baseline to gauge the progress achieved against outcomes of the Action Plan. Accordingly, indicators will be tracked until DPR FY2015-16. Where new data are created and captured to track progress directly, some of the indicators will be replaced by others that are more reflective of the outcome being tracked in order to continually improve performance monitoring and reporting.

Departments and agencies involved in the implementation of Action Plan initiatives have been working closely with their U.S. counterparts in ensuring the success of each initiative. While this report for 2012-13 focuses on Canadian efforts to ensure the success of the Action Plan, the first annual joint Canada-U.S. implementation report was published in December 2012. The Action Plan commits the two governments to report annually on implementation.

Appendix A – Beyond the Border Action Plan Initiatives:

Appendix A – Beyond the Border Action Plan Initiatives:
Initiative # Initiative Lead and Contributing Department(s)/Agency(ies)
1 Joint Threat Assessments Public Safety Canada
2 Information/Intelligence Sharing Public Safety Canada
  • Department of Justice
3 Domain Awareness Royal Canadian Mounted Police
  • Transport Canada
  • Public Safety Canada
4 Countering Violent Extremism Public Safety Canada
5 Integrated Cargo Security Canada Border Services Agency
  • Transport Canada
6 Passenger Baggage Screening Transport Canada
7 Joint FPA Assessments/Audits Canadian Food Inspection Agency
8 Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) Citizenship and Immigration Canada
9 Interactive Advanced Passenger Information (IAPI) - Board/No Board Canada Border Services Agency
10 Immigration Information Sharing Citizenship and Immigration Canada
11 Entry/Exit Information Systems Canada Border Services Agency
  • Citizenship and Immigration Canada
12 Enhancing Benefits for Trusted Trader Programs Canada Border Services Agency
13 Increasing Harmonized Benefits to NEXUS Members Canada Border Services Agency
  • Transport Canada
14 Enhancing Facilities to Support Trusted Trader and Traveller Programs Canada Border Services Agency
15 Pre-Inspection and Pre-Clearance Initiatives Public Safety Canada
  • Transport Canada
  • Canada Border Services  Agency
  • Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada
  • Canadian Food Inspection Agency
16 Facilitating the Conduct of Cross-Border Business Citizenship and Immigration Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
17 Single Window Canada Border Services Agency
18 Harmonizing Low Value Shipment Thresholds Canada Border Services Agency
  • Finance
19 Accountability for Border Fees/Charges Public Safety Canada
20 Upgrading and Expanding Infrastructure at Key Crossings Transport Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
21 Coordinating Investments at Small and Remote Ports of Entry Canada Border Services Agency
22 Deploying Border Wait-Time Technology and Establishing Wait-Time Service Levels Transport Canada
  • Canada Border Services Agency
23 Installing RFID Technology Canada Border Services Agency
24 Organizing Bi-National Port Operations Committees Canada Border Services Agency
25 Shiprider/Next Generation - Pursuing National Security and Transnational Criminal Investigations
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police
26 Providing Radio Interoperability for Law Enforcement
  • Public Safety Canada
  • Royal Canadian Mounted Police
27 Enhancing Cross-Border Critical Infrastructure and Resilience Public Safety Canada
28 Government and Digital Infrastructure - Strengthening Cyber Security Public Safety Canada
29 Expanding Joint Leadership on International Cyber Security Efforts Public Safety Canada
30 Mitigating the Impacts of Disruptions on Communities and the Economy Transport Canada (Marine)
Public Safety Canada (Land)
31 Enhancing Preparedness for Health Security Threats Public Safety Canada
32 Emergency Management CBRNE and Interoperability Public Safety Canada
33 BTB Governance and Oversight - Executive Steering Committee Privy Council Office
34 Developing a Statement of Privacy Principles and Practices Public Safety Canada
  • Department of Justice

Note: Shared Services Canada is a key partner to both lead and contributing departments/agencies in supporting Beyond the Border information technology infrastructure requirements.

Footnotes

  1. 1

    http://pm.gc.ca/eng/media.asp?id=3938

  2. 2

    http://actionplan.gc.ca/en/content/beyond-border

  3. 3

    The 2012 Beyond the Border Implementation Report can be found at - http://actionplan.gc.ca/en/page/bbg-tpf/2012-beyond-border-implementation-report

  4. 4

    Action Plan initiatives, other than those listed under this theme, also contribute to the outcomes enclosed within the dotted line box.

  5. 5

    Amounts presented in this table do not include BTB funds (nor expenditures) provided to Shared Services Canada or to the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada. These funds will be tracked in future reports.

  6. 6

    Performance metric implemented in 2012-13. Results for 2012-13 will be considered as baseline data.

  7. 7

    Data for 2012-13 will be available in 2013-14.

  8. 8

    The GOC provides an all-hazards integrated federal emergency response to events (potential or actual hazards, natural or human-induced, either accidental or intentional) of national interest. It provides 24/7 monitoring and reporting, national-level situational awareness, warning products and integrated risk assessments, as well as national-level planning and whole-of-government response management.

  9. 9

    Action Plan initiatives, other than those listed under this theme, also contribute to the outcomes enclosed within the dotted line box.

  10. 10

    Amounts presented in this table do not include BTB funds (nor expenditures) provided to Health Canada, Public Health Agency of Canada, Environment Canada, Natural Resources Canada, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission or to Fisheries and Oceans Canada under Initiative 17 – Single Window. These funds will be tracked in future reports.

  11. 11

    Performance information is not available at this time as this data is dependent on RFID technology that has yet to be implemented.

  12. 12

    Performance information is not available for 2011-12 due to system constraints.

  13. 13

    Measurement of shipment examination rates was limited to CSA in 2011-12.

  14. 14

    Amounts presented in this table do not include BTB funds (nor expenditures) provided to the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions. These funds will be tracked in future reports.

  15. 15

    Data not available as the implementation of interoperable infrastructure under Initiative 26 – Providing Radio Interoperability for Law Enforcement started in 2012-13.

  16. 16

    RCMP's Border Integrity Operations Centre (BIOC) and the U.S. border law enforcement facilities located in Blaine, Washington (1 ÷ 8 = 12.5%).

  17. 17

    Full-time Shiprider operations will begin in 2013-14 and the Next Generation initiative is currently in abeyance. Accordingly, there were no arrests or seizures in 2012-13 under these initiatives.

  18. 18

    The survey is conducted every 2 years; figure for 2010-11 presented.

  19. 19

    Initiative 25 – Shiprider/Next Generation was not operational in 2011-12 or 2012-13. However, training and deployment began in 2012-13.

  20. 20

    Target of deploying at least two Shiprider teams by summer 2012, as identified in the BTB Action Plan, has been reached. Two additional teams are to be deployed in 2015-16.

  21. 21

    The Critical Infrastructure Resilience Score will measure the ability of critical infrastructure sectors to withstand disruptions and recover quickly in the event of a disaster. The overall score will represent a weighted average across critical infrastructure sectors and allow for monitoring progress towards improving critical infrastructure resilience over time.

  22. 22

    Initiative 28 – Government and Digital Infrastructure – Strengthening Cyber Security was implemented in 2012-13. Accordingly, joint or coordinated engagements with the private sector and external stakeholders, as well as the development of joint briefings, presentations and communications products under Initiative 28 began in 2012-13.

  23. 23

    Canadian-U.S. Pacific Region was completed in 2012-13. Joint Canada-U.S. committees have been identified and established for the development of similar guides and protocols to support the recovery of maritime trade following an emergency in the Atlantic and Great Lakes regions.

  24. 24

    http://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/cnt/rsrcs/pblctns/cybrscrt-ctn-plan/cybrscrt-ctn-plan-eng.pdf

  25. 25

    http://www.publicsafety.gc.ca/cnt/rsrcs/pblctns/cnsdrtns-ntdstts-cnd/cnsdrtns-ntdstts-cnd-eng.pdf  

  26. 26

    The Canadian Multi-Agency Situational Awareness System project makes it possible to share location-based situational awareness information and alerts, between first response and emergency management agencies, using open standards and an open architecture.

  27. 27

    The American IPAWS provides public safety officials with an effective way to alert and warn the public about serious emergencies using the Emergency Alert System (EAS), Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather Radio, and other public alerting systems from a single interface.

  28. 28

    VirtualUSA is a more user-driven interface which is a separate service from IPAWS.

  29. 29

    http://actionplan.gc.ca/en/backgrounder/bap-paf/statement-privacy-principles-united-states-and-canada

  30. 30

    http://www.oecd.org/sti/ieconomy/oecdguidelinesontheprotectionofprivacyandtransborderflowsofpersonaldata.htm

  31. 31

    http://www.cbsa.gc.ca/btb-pdf/es-se-eng.html

  32. 32

    http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/department/atip/pia/ist.asp

  33. i

    CBSA variance between Total Planned Spending and Actual Spending in Theme 1 is primarily due to the following:

  • Initiative 5 – Integrated Cargo Security

The Agency secured funding in the final quarter of 2012-13, later than anticipated. The full cost of the project will remain the same as these funds will be carried forward to next year to meet the commitments made under the Action Plan.  

As well, delays in staffing processes resulted in a lapse of salary and associated operating and maintenance funding. A delay in the start date of Pilot Projects reduced operational spending amounts and postponed key meetings, travel and workshops with key partners and stakeholders.

In addition, delays occurred in spending on information technology as requirements needed to be consolidated to address program requirements and streamline solutions. This necessitated a review across the information technology solutions, which in turn delayed the start of certain projects. The proposed amalgamated solutions will, however, still achieve the targets outlined in the Beyond the Border Action Plan objectives.

  • Initiative 10 – Immigration Information Sharing

Funding was risk managed early in the previous fiscal year as the majority of the funding was not released until late 2012. This caused a delay in the substantive project initiation and staffing exercises. Due to delays to the substantive project initiation phase, some planned 2012-13 work items were moved to 2013-14, including certain expected capital expenditures. Further, some of the capital expenditures rely on Shared Services Canada infrastructure work for which timelines have recently been confirmed. As a result projected expenditures will rise for the final quarter in 2013-14.

  1. ii

    CIC variance between Total Planned Spending and Actual Spending in Theme 1 is primarily due to the following:

  • Initiative 10 - Immigration Information Sharing
    • IT related expenditures varied for the following reasons:
      • CIC forecasted the purchase of software. This forecast did not materialize and was pushed into 2013-14. 
      • For 2012-13, consultants did not use 100% of the days available in the contract as requirements were lower than anticipated. Also, the service contracts provide for overtime. For 2012-13, the consultants did not use all of the overtime in the contracts.
      • Professional services and training related to software purchased was rescheduled to the next fiscal year due to a shift in priorities.
  1. iii

    TC variance between Total Planned Spending and Actual Spending in Theme 1 is primarily due to the following:

  • Initiative 6 - Passenger Baggage Screening
    The implementation of the Mutual Recognition of Outbound Checked Baggage was initiated in 2011-12. The initial plan as of July 29, 2011 represented CATSA's estimated annual costs to support the deployment plan developed at that time. However, due to the complexity of Hold Baggage Screening (HBS) integration projects and requirements from airport authorities, the timelines surrounding CATSA's HBS integration projects are often subject to fluctuations outside of CATSA's control, and projects may be pushed from one year to the next.
    • The variance between planned spending and actual expenditures for the fiscal year 2012-13 is due to changes in airport project plans for four Class I airports, beyond CATSA's control which have resulted in delays in the deployment of the new HBS system. The HBS deployment for these airports has been rescheduled to be completed in fiscal years 2013-14 and 2014-15.
  1. iv

    CBSA variance between Total Planned Spending and Actual Spending in Theme 2 is primarily due to the following:

  • Initiative 12 - Enhancing Benefits for Trusted Trader Programs

The Agency secured funding in the final quarter of 2012-13, later than anticipated. The full cost of the project will remain the same as these funds will be carried forward to next year to meet the commitments made under the Action Plan.   

In addition, delays occurred in spending on information technology as requirements needed to be consolidated to address program requirements and streamline solutions. This necessitated a review across the solutions, which in turn delayed the start of certain projects. The proposed amalgamated solutions will achieve the targets outlined in the Beyond the Border Action Plan objectives.

  • Initiative 13 - Increasing Harmonized Benefits to NEXUS Members

The Agency was secured funding in the final quarter of 2012-13, later than anticipated. The full cost of the project will remain the same as these funds will be carried forward to next year to meet the commitments made under the Action Plan. 

The Agency was able to fulfill the following key projects in 2012-13: enrolment blitzes; and NEXUS marketing materials (educational and promotional products; member guides). 

Due to the delayed implementation of various projects such as production of NEXUS videos, funds were not fully spent in 2012-13. The postponement of key meetings, travel and workshops with key partners and stakeholders also resulted in fewer funds being spent in 2012-13.

In addition, delays occurred in spending on information technology as requirements needed to be consolidated to address program requirements and streamline solutions. This necessitated a review across the solutions, which in turn delayed the start of certain projects. The proposed amalgamated solutions will, however, still achieve the targets outlined in the Beyond the Border Action Plan objectives.

  • Initiative 14 - Enhancing Facilities to Support Trusted Trader and Traveller Programs

The variance between planned spending and actual spending was, in part, the result of the Agency only being able to secure funding in the final quarter of 2012-2013, later than anticipated. The full cost of the project will remain the same as these funds will be carried forward to next year to meet the commitments made under the Action Plan. 

In FAST - CBSA did not enhance the facilities because the funds are in a frozen allotment and have not been released.

The 2012-13 spending is related to the addition of NEXUS lanes at the following land ports of entry: Abbotsford, Douglas, Sarnia, Pacific Highway and Fort Erie.

The NEXUS lanes at Queenston will be implemented in May 2013 and additional lanes are to be implemented in Lacolle and Windsor Tunnel prior to the end of 2013. The remaining port of Aldergrove will be delayed due to construction at the port. It will be necessary to reprofile funds to 2015-16 to allow for the remaining lane expansion. 

The postponement of key meetings, travel and workshops with key partners and stakeholders resulted in funds not being spent.

In addition, delays occurred in spending on information technology as requirements needed to be consolidated to address program requirements and streamlining solutions. This necessitated a review across the solutions, which in turn delayed the start of certain projects. Even though this has caused a slight delay, the proposed amalgamated solutions will achieve the targets outlined in the Beyond the Border Action Plan objectives.

  • Initiative 17 - Single Window (SWI)

The variance between planned spending and actual spending was, in part, the result of the Agency only being able to secure funding in the final quarter of 2012-13, later than anticipated. The full cost of the project will remain the same as these funds will be carried forward to next year to meet the commitments made under the Action Plan.

As the schedule for the Beyond the Border Action Plan is aggressive with the first major SWI commitment being planned for December 2013, CBSA and in particular ISTB moved the major development of this commitment from 2012-2013 to 2013-2014. The CBSA IT Branch completed an impact assessment for SWI but further refinement was required, as well as the development of a mitigation plan going forward. SWI Project Plan was delayed due to waiting for IT sign off.

As well, there is added complexity in relating to coordination and integration of the 9 participating government agencies and the top 4 priority departments (Health Canada, Canadian Food Inspection Agency, Transport Canada, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade Development) all ramping up for the December 2013 date and re-allocating funds within their reference levels.

It must also be noted the aforementioned constraints had human resource impacts (staffing, recruitment) on the launch of the initiative in 2012-2013.

  1. v

    RCMP variance between Total Planned Spending and Actual Spending in Theme 3 is primarily due to the following:

  • Initiative 25 - Shiprider/Next Generation

The RCMP and the U.S. Coast Guard have signed both National and Regional Standard Operating Procedures and the Information Sharing MOU. Shiprider Teams have been deployed within the two locations and operations are being conducted. The variance between planned and actual spending in Theme 3 is due to not being able to fully ramp up Shiprider resources as quickly as initially estimated. However, moving forward, both locations have been successful in staffing their resources for 2013-14. As well, expenditures for certain technology components of the Radio Interoperability project were less than originally projected, and some equipment and software expenditures were delayed beyond the fiscal year-end to permit sufficient timing for testing and quality assurance.

  1. vi

    PS variance between Total Planned Spending and Actual Spending in Theme 4 is primarily due to the following:

  • Initiative 27 - Enhancing Cross-Border Critical Infrastructure and Resilience

To meet commitments under the Beyond the Border Action Plan, internal resources were reallocated to conduct site assessments in New Brunswick, including border crossings, nuclear generating stations, and liquefied natural gas terminals.  Expenditures included salary for staff to conduct site assessments, and O&M expenditures for travel, equipment and protective gear. Additional expenditures relate to engagement with provinces/territories and private sector stakeholders in Ontario, Saskatchewan, British Columbia and Quebec in order to facilitate expansion of the RRAP. Expenditures relating to the Virtual Risk Analysis Cell focused on purchasing data (e.g. data to support geospatial analysis) and additional salary dollars to help prioritize site assessments and conduct dependency analysis.

  1. vii

    PCO PS variance between Total Planned Spending and Actual Spending in Theme 4 is primarily due to the following:

  • Initiative 33 - BTB Governance and Oversight

The less-than-expected spending is mainly due to less travel than anticipated, greater use of videoconferencing, smaller delegations for travel to Canada and the US; an office that was partly staffed by secondments funded by other departments; and anticipated costs related to accommodation that did not materialize.